Connect with us

Re: Phonetic Alphabet Tables

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Peter Aberrant, Apr 19, 2004.

  1. Phonetic Alphabet Tables

    Useful for spelling words and names over the phone. cut out the table containing phonetic alphabet (below), and tape it to the side of your phone when you are on the telephone it could be some help. and post it to your electronic email groups

    I was inspired to post this page and post it online when I overheard a co-worker say "L, as in Log" over the phone.

    normally one would not say V as in victor P as in

    Papa, G as in Golf but

    Victor Papa, Golf for VPG


    NATO Phonetic Alphabet Letter phonetic letter
    A Alpha
    B Bravo
    C Charlie
    D Delta
    E Echo
    F Foxtrot
    G Golf
    H Hotel
    I India
    J Juliet
    K Kilo
    L Lima
    M Mike
    N November
    O Oscar
    P Papa
    Q Quebec
    R Romeo
    S Sierra
    T Tango
    U Uniform
    V Victor
    W Whiskey
    X X-ray
    Y Yankee
    Z Zulu
     
  2. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    Dont need to, its permanently embedded in my head.
    No thanks.
    The phonetic table was designed to work when the comms
    channel is awful. That isnt true with modern phone calls.

    The non official approach works fine.
    The official table does work suprisingly well even
    with recipients who have never even heard of it.
     
  3. WEBPA

    WEBPA Guest

    As it should. It is about the 5th iteration of the "Marconi" (IIRC) table from
    the early 1920s. A NATO committee put quite a bit of effort into the current
    table in the (? mid-1950s) to produce a set usable in all major alliance
    languagues (even French).
    It is specifically designed to avoid ambiguous start-mid-end sounds in words
    like "log"....dog? hog? bog? lag? gag? ... USW.

    If you've never needed to "spell it out" on a cellphone, then you don't use a
    cellphone much (on any continent).
    webpa
     
  4. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    Phonetic Alphabet Tables

    Useful for spelling words and names over the phone. cut out the table
    containing phonetic alphabet (below), and tape it to the side of your phone
    when you are on the telephone it could be some help. and post it to your
    electronic email groups

    I was inspired to post this page and post it online when I overheard a
    co-worker say "L, as in Log" over the phone.

    normally one would not say V as in victor P as in

    Papa, G as in Golf but

    Victor Papa, Golf for VPG


    NATO Phonetic Alphabet Letter phonetic letter
    A Alpha
    B Bravo
    C Charlie
    D Delta
    E Echo
    F Foxtrot
    G Golf
    H Hotel
    I India
    J Juliet
    K Kilo
    L Lima
    M Mike
    N November
    O Oscar
    P Papa
    Q Quebec
    R Romeo
    S Sierra
    T Tango
    U Uniform
    V Victor
    W Whiskey
    X X-ray
    Y Yankee
    Z Zulu

    All very good for clarity.
    The version you post, i believe is that used internationally by air traffic
    control but unfortunately I think there are different flavours, sorry
    flavors.
    Don't Americans use Radio instead of Romeo and something other than
    F-Foxtrot

    electronic hints and repair briefs , schematics/manuals list on
    http://homepages.tcp.co.uk/~diverse
     
  5. A is fer 'orses
    B fer cattle
    C fer yourself...

    ;-)

    big (P as in pneumonia, K as in knife, M as in mnemonic, G as in gnome)
     
  6. Binary Era

    Binary Era Guest

    Has anyone got a list of the British Able Baker Charlie
    Dog.....alphabet?
     
  7. Brian Reay

    Brian Reay Guest

    Should be able to piece it together with a bit of research. Any RNARS or
    Royal Signals members on the group?

    I recall when I was first licensed working G3WDR "Woolly Dog Roger", must be
    25 years back and it still gives me a laugh.

    There is this:
    http://www.486th.org/Photos/Letters/phonetic.htm




    --
    73
    Brian
    G8OSN
    www.g8osn.org.uk
    www.amateurradiotraining.org.uk for FREE training material for all UK
    amateur radio licences
    www.phoenixradioclub.org.uk - a RADIO club specifically for those wishing
    to learn more about amateur radio
     
  8. At the risk of being pedantic (won't be too noticeable here, then!) I
    shoudl point out that it's the ICAO phonetic alphabet - International
    Civil Aviation Organization. http://www.icao.int/

    145, Pete/Igor PH1PH - G7ECN
     
  9. Rubbish.
    They don't have ownership of a phonetic alphabet.
    And anyway you should know yourself that radio organisations refer to it as
    the ITU recommended phonetics. (International Telecommunication Union)

    Marty Wallace VK6ABC
     
  10. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    Used for a hell of a lot more than just that, and its
    used much more for national air traffic control too.
    That is likely the most commonly used situation today.
    Nope, its been standardised for a long time now.
    Nope.

    A little something to really blow your 'mind'
    http://www.bckelk.uklinux.net/phon.full.html
     
  11. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

  12. Marty

    Marty Guest

    The version the OP listed is the accepted international version that should
    be used by all radio comms, it's just that some people (yanks and other
    cultures as well) adopt their own variations for some reason, probably
    because their are too damn lazy to remember the correct version - for
    example, though in Australia you need to learn and know the above version to
    pass you amateur radio exam, once you have the licence apparently you forget
    everything you've learnt and start using your own personal interpretation of
    the phonetics.......

    At the end of the day, as long as the message gets through OK, who cares if
    its Alpha or Apple?????
     
  13. Geoff

    Geoff Guest

    The real point is, that if the correct phoenetics are used, there is a good
    chance that somebody who does not speak English, even as a secondary
    language, will understand. Using Able, Apple or Archemedies rather than
    Alpha will only serve to confuse. That is one of the (few) advantages when
    using the Q codes with CW.

    YG
     
  14. Incognito

    Incognito Guest

    Able Baker Charlie Dog.....alphabet was also used by the US Navy prior to
    1954 see URL:
    http://www.bckelk.uklinux.net/phon.full.html

    The above URL has more Phonetic Alphabets than you ever want to know about.

    Currently, In the USA, the FCC sez: -- §97.119 Station identification. (2)
    By a phone emission in the English language. Use of a standard phonetic
    alphabet as an aid for correct station identification is encouraged.
    The ARRL sez the recognized standard is the ITU Phonetic Alphabet -- Word
    list adopted by the International Telecommunications Union, approved by
    NATO, the International Civil Aviation Organization, the FAA, and many
    National Amateur Leagues/Societies/Orgs. Adapted about 1955 -- URL:

    http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/forms/fsd220.html#alphabet

    However many DXers use a DXing phonetic alphabet based mostly on country
    names but includes "radio"-- Unofficial -- see URL:

    http://ac6v.com/dxphonetics.htm
     
  15. Marty

    Marty Guest

    Granted, but I presume that as I only speak english I will most likely not
    be speaking to someone that doesn't speak english at all...... and if I do,
    it will probably be a rather one sided conversation and phonetics will most
    likely be the least of our translation problems!! ;-)

    Still, I am always amazed at the amateur operators that go to the trouble of
    learning the phonetic alphabet to pass the test, only to toss it all away
    afterward and use their own version. Just hearing the different versions on
    air can get rather annoying!!!
     
  16. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    That's not the point. Non-native English speakers might intepret alternate
    english words as the wrong letter. Even though they may 'speak' English,
    they still 'think' German, or Russian or whatever. Any student of any
    foreign language can tell you that the letters of the alphabet are
    pronounced differently than they are in English. For instance, "E" is
    pronounced as "ay" in German. Using the standard phonetic alphabet with no
    subsitutions ensures that someone using 'alpha' instead of 'able' to a
    native German speaker is understood to mean "A" instead of "E".

    OT: I once won a game of Trivial Pursuit in German. One of the q's which
    put me over the top, translated loosely, was "When would a German use the
    words alpha, bravo, charlie, delta etc?" The answer of course was, when
    speaking on the radio.
    Maybe that's why they're called 'amateurs.' ;-)

    jak
     
  17. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    I am not a radio amateur but I did learn the phonetic alphabet
    because I was forever relaying model numbers etc via phone.
    I did at one time regularly listen to GB2RS ,IIRC ,sunday mornings
    and every week I would find it annoying ,
    or at least dstracting, hearing S- for Sugar etc

    electronic hints and repair briefs , schematics/manuals list on
    http://homepages.tcp.co.uk/~diverse
     
  18. Binary Era

    Binary Era Guest

    I grew up with Able Baker Charlie Dog when it was a live phonetic
    alphabet.

    Why should I change just because /you/ want all your toys in line?
     
  19. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Just remember that a lot of these phonetics that annoy you *were the
    standard ones* when the operator got their licence!!!

    2 Emma Toc

    This doesn't apply to M3's of course (;-)

    Jeff
     
  20. Brian Reay

    Brian Reay Guest

    I have to agree with you, I quite like to hear some of the variations in
    Phonetic alphabet- they are analogous to the individual 'fist' of the CW
    operator. Provided they are not abusive and when required (eg to assist a
    foreign amateur) the OP reverts to the ITU standard, I can see no harm.


    --
    73
    Brian
    G8OSN
    www.g8osn.org.uk
    www.amateurradiotraining.org.uk for FREE training material for all UK
    amateur radio licences
    www.phoenixradioclub.org.uk - a RADIO club specifically for those wishing
    to learn more about amateur radio
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-