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UK international phonetic alphabet

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Lem, May 6, 2006.

  1. Lem

    Lem Guest

    Here in the UK, when I am on the phone I sometimes have to spell out
    words such as my address.

    I like to use the Nato phonetic alphabet ("M for Mike") but other people
    on the phone call often use something different ("M for mother").

    I have to admit that "Mike" does have a rather Anglo-Saxon feel to it.
    It may not be all that easily understood by a basic english speaker from
    Latin America or Asia Pacific.

    There are many phonetic alphabets www.tkos.co.il/phonetic.alphabet.html
    but which one(s) can I use today in a wide range of situations?

    For example, which can I use in

    (a) purely UK domestic situations ("M as in cream")
    (b) international situations


    Thank you.
    Lem
     
  2. (a) .
    A for 'Orses .................. ('ay for 'orses)
    B for Mutton .................. (Beef or Mutton)
    C for Miles ................... (See for Miles)
    D for Ential .................. (Differential)
    E for Brick ................... ('eave a Brick)
    F for Vescence ................ (Effervescence)
    G for Get It .................. (Gee, forget it!)
    H for Bless You ............... (Aitsshfa! A Sneeze)
    I for The Engine .............. (Ivor the Engine)
    J for Oranges ................. (Jaffa Oranges)
    K for Restaurant .............. (Cafe or Restaurant)
    L for Leather ................. ('ell for Leather)
    M for Sis' .................... (Emphasis)
    N for Lope .................... (Envelope)
    O for The Wings Of A Dove ..... (O! for the Wings of a Dove!)
    P for Relief .................. (?!?!)
    Q for A Bus ................... (Queue for a Bus)
    R for Mo' ..................... ('alf a Mo')
    S for Rantzen ................. (Esther Rantzen)
    T for Two ..................... (Tea for Two)
    U for Me ...................... (You for Me)
    V for La France ............... (Vive la France)
    W for The Winnings ............ (Double you for the Winnings)
    X for Breakfast ............... (Eggs for Breakfast)
    Y for Husband ................. (Wife or Husband)
    Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)

    (b) .0NAT
     
  3. Hexenmeister

    Hexenmeister Guest

    | Here in the UK, when I am on the phone I sometimes have to spell out
    | words such as my address.
    |
    | I like to use the Nato phonetic alphabet ("M for Mike") but other people
    | on the phone call often use something different ("M for mother").


    Many make it up as the go along. So what, if you know what they mean?
    http://www.bckelk.uklinux.net/able.html

    Androcles


    |
    | I have to admit that "Mike" does have a rather Anglo-Saxon feel to it.
    | It may not be all that easily understood by a basic english speaker from
    | Latin America or Asia Pacific.
    |
    | There are many phonetic alphabets www.tkos.co.il/phonetic.alphabet.html
    | but which one(s) can I use today in a wide range of situations?


    |
    | For example, which can I use in
    |
    | (a) purely UK domestic situations ("M as in cream")
    | (b) international situations
    |
    |
    | Thank you.
    | Lem
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    | Posted to groups likely to use phonetic alphabets
    |
    | http://sundials.org/about/humpty.htm
    | http://www.netfunny.com/rhf/jokes/95q4/phonetic.html
    |
     
  4. Guest

    "P" as on "phonetic"?
     
  5. The Nato/ international one has the widest use and acceptance
    in the UK.

    Martin Hogbin
     
  6. also
    G for Police.....................(Chief of Police)
    and
    H for It..................................(hate you for it)
    In the UK this last one is, Z for his hat .............(his head for his hat)

    Martin Hogbin
     
  7. TimPerry

    TimPerry Guest

    dont worry about phonics, just learn all the "Q" signals
     
  8. Hexenmeister

    Hexenmeister Guest

    |
    | >
    | > | > > For example, which can I use in
    | > >
    | > > (a) purely UK domestic situations ("M as in cream")
    | > > (b) international situations
    | >
    | > (a) .
    | > A for 'Orses .................. ('ay for 'orses)
    | > B for Mutton .................. (Beef or Mutton)
    | > C for Miles ................... (See for Miles)
    | > D for Ential .................. (Differential)
    | > E for Brick ................... ('eave a Brick)
    | > F for Vescence ................ (Effervescence)
    | > G for Get It .................. (Gee, forget it!)
    |
    | also
    | G for Police.....................(Chief of Police)
    |
    | > H for Bless You ............... (Aitsshfa! A Sneeze)
    |
    | and
    | H for It..................................(hate you for it)
    |
    | > I for The Engine .............. (Ivor the Engine)
    | > J for Oranges ................. (Jaffa Oranges)
    | > K for Restaurant .............. (Cafe or Restaurant)
    | > L for Leather ................. ('ell for Leather)
    | > M for Sis' .................... (Emphasis)
    | > N for Lope .................... (Envelope)
    | > O for The Wings Of A Dove ..... (O! for the Wings of a Dove!)
    | > P for Relief .................. (?!?!)
    | > Q for A Bus ................... (Queue for a Bus)
    | > R for Mo' ..................... ('alf a Mo')
    | > S for Rantzen ................. (Esther Rantzen)
    | > T for Two ..................... (Tea for Two)
    | > U for Me ...................... (You for Me)
    | > V for La France ............... (Vive la France)
    | > W for The Winnings ............ (Double you for the Winnings)
    | > X for Breakfast ............... (Eggs for Breakfast)
    | > Y for Husband ................. (Wife or Husband)
    | > Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)
    |
    | In the UK this last one is, Z for his hat .............(his head for his
    hat)
    |
    | Martin Hogbin

    You can't have zed for titfer. A hat is a titfer in the UK - tit for tat.

    http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/

    'Owzat?
    Androcles
     
  9. Mike Clayton

    Mike Clayton Guest

    With the exception of Gold, the above is what I was taught in the RAF.
    We used Golf.
     
  10. Bob Eager

    Bob Eager Guest

    I have always used Golf (amateur radio only, no RAF!)
     
  11. until.0 you .0have.0 to .0spell .0them.0 out.0 LOL
     
  12. Peter

    Peter Guest

    It's Golf - Gold may be confused with Cold
    I still use Zulu - or do you think Yankee should be changed for the
    sake of PC?
     
  13. Prometheus

    Prometheus Guest

    Why no PC objection to this?
    Why should a reference to the Zulu nation be unacceptable but not to
    India? Or even Quebec?
     
  14. Not out.

    Having had a look round the net it would seem that
    Z for Wind was used in the UK.

    Martin Hogbin
     
  15. Lem

    Lem Guest




    I am the OP. The trouble is that phonetic alphabet is that it sounds
    and feels like something from the wartime RAF or army complete stiff
    upper lip and clipped handlebar moustaches.

    U for uniform? This is 2006 and "U for uncle" is what I sometimes hear
    and which I think is far better for use between two UK natives because
    of its universaility and it retains clarity.

    As I posted, "M for mother" is often heard and probably better
    understood than "M for Mike" (mic ? Michael?).

    Quebec and Lima (you have some missing) are probably not even on the
    mental map for a lot of the recently educated UK population. It's not
    for me to educate these people (not to denigrate them) but I sometimes
    need to communicate clearly with them. Queen? London?

    T for Tommy has got to beat Tango which is now widely seen as a trade
    name.

    F for Freddy is surely nicer than foxtrot. This isn't the 1930's.

    Heh!
     
  16. What industry? I have never heard 'Gold' or 'Zebra' used.
     
  17. Prometheus

    Prometheus Guest

    They are supposed to be recognisable sounds for use in poor conditions
    which people who need to use them are familiar with and know start with
    the specific letter, there is no requirement to know where Quebec is for
    example. It also does not matter if you say Mic (microphone) or Mike
    (Michael), they sound the same and both begin with 'M' whereas 'mother'
    could be misheard as 'other' and being non-standard the listener would
    not know they had misheard; was it 'Tommy' or 'pome', is it Fready or
    Ready? Oh, and isn't Tommy a brand of children's toys?

    Oh, and just what is the connexion with sci.physics?
     
  18. Quite!
     
  19. Lem

    Lem Guest

    I would suggest that hearing is connected with meaning.

    If I say "W for wardle", you might hear wardle correctly but need to
    stop and ask me if I meant "wardle" as it is not a word you have
    heard of before.

    --
    sci.physics is read by people who have to be very precise in their
    spoken technical communications with colleagues on the phone and are
    likely to involve formulas. If the formula is a new one in which you
    have selected the variables yourself then it's essential to
    communicate exactly the right variable as its context may not be a
    guide to which variable is intended.

    (By contrast sci.chem's communications often involve coumpounds whose
    chemical formulas are often already known or the communcations are
    partly self-correcting in that certain combinations of elements may
    not be possible and there are a relatively small and limited number
    of compounds which satisfy the remaining valence of a parent
    compound.)

    HTH.

    sigged.
     
  20. Hexenmeister

    Hexenmeister Guest

    |
    | >
    | > | > |
    | > | > | >
    | > | > | > | > > For example, which can I use in
    | > | > >
    | > | > > (a) purely UK domestic situations ("M as in cream")
    | > | > > (b) international situations
    | > | >
    | > | > (a) .
    | > | > A for 'Orses .................. ('ay for 'orses)
    | > | > B for Mutton .................. (Beef or Mutton)
    | > | > C for Miles ................... (See for Miles)
    | > | > D for Ential .................. (Differential)
    | > | > E for Brick ................... ('eave a Brick)
    | > | > F for Vescence ................ (Effervescence)
    | > | > G for Get It .................. (Gee, forget it!)
    | > |
    | > | also
    | > | G for Police.....................(Chief of Police)
    | > |
    | > | > H for Bless You ............... (Aitsshfa! A Sneeze)
    | > |
    | > | and
    | > | H for It..................................(hate you for it)
    | > |
    | > | > I for The Engine .............. (Ivor the Engine)
    | > | > J for Oranges ................. (Jaffa Oranges)
    | > | > K for Restaurant .............. (Cafe or Restaurant)
    | > | > L for Leather ................. ('ell for Leather)
    | > | > M for Sis' .................... (Emphasis)
    | > | > N for Lope .................... (Envelope)
    | > | > O for The Wings Of A Dove ..... (O! for the Wings of a Dove!)
    | > | > P for Relief .................. (?!?!)
    | > | > Q for A Bus ................... (Queue for a Bus)
    | > | > R for Mo' ..................... ('alf a Mo')
    | > | > S for Rantzen ................. (Esther Rantzen)
    | > | > T for Two ..................... (Tea for Two)
    | > | > U for Me ...................... (You for Me)
    | > | > V for La France ............... (Vive la France)
    | > | > W for The Winnings ............ (Double you for the Winnings)
    | > | > X for Breakfast ............... (Eggs for Breakfast)
    | > | > Y for Husband ................. (Wife or Husband)
    | > | > Z for Wind .................... (Zephyr Wind)
    | > |
    | > | In the UK this last one is, Z for his hat .............(his head for
    his
    | > hat)
    | > |
    | > | Martin Hogbin
    | >
    | > You can't have zed for titfer. A hat is a titfer in the UK - tit for
    tat.
    | >
    | > http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/
    | >
    | > 'Owzat?
    |
    | Not out.
    |
    | Having had a look round the net it would seem that
    | Z for Wind was used in the UK.

    Yikes!

    Figured out how to calibrate doppler radar yet so that you can measure
    the speed of a train, or are you still troubled?
    You'll find most train drivers rely on speedometers, they seem adequate
    for the task, but of course they are measuring the speed of the track.
    It does seem to be the same thing, though.

    When asked if New York stops at this train, Galileo replied "Yes".

    Einstein said "As has already been shown to the first order
    of small quantities (by Galileo, but the secret to creativity
    is knowing how to hide your sources so we won't mention him)
    the same laws of mechanics will be valid for all frames of
    reference for which the equations of electrodynamics and optics
    hold good. We will raise this conjecture (the purport of which
    will hereafter be called the "Principle of Relativity" so that
    it looks as if I discovered it) to the status of a postulate,
    because everything should be as simple as possible but not simpler
    and imagination is more important than knowledge and if we knew
    what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would
    it? and as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they
    are not certain; as far as they are certain, they do not refer to
    reality and God doesn't play craps, poker or roulette and he may
    be subtle, but he isn't plain mean and God does not care about our
    mathematical difficulties; he integrates empirically and and what
    really interests me is whether God had any choice in the creation
    of the world and I never think of the future, it comes soon enough
    and if you are out to describe the truth, leave elegance to the
    tailor and a table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what
    else does a man need to be happy? and it would be possible to
    describe everything scientifically, but it would make no sense
    and common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age
    eighteen and the whole of science is nothing more than a
    refinement of everyday thinking and do not worry about your
    difficulties in Mathematics, I can assure you mine are still
    greater and two things are infinite: the universe and human
    stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    Which is all very well, but does New York stop at this fucking
    train or not?
    It had better, or the Hudson River will stop at this train.


    Androcles.



    | Martin Hogbin
    |
    |
     
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