Connect with us

photoelectric lithography

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Jamie M, Mar 3, 2012.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Jamie M

    Jamie M Guest

    Hi,

    I had an idea for a new type of lithography, that uses a photocathode
    to convert a 2D light image into a 2D electron beam image which is then
    accelerated and focused down smaller with electromagnetic lenses and
    projected onto the silicon wafer down to smaller feature sizes than the
    light image can make since the electron wavelength is smaller than the
    lights wavelength.

    cheers,
    Jamie
     
  2. Jamie M

    Jamie M Guest

    Hi,

    I guess its like a transmission electron microscope in reverse, I think
    there are some modern aberration corrected electron optics that seem
    pretty amazing, not sure how they work exactly, but can do spatial
    resolution down to 0.05nm apparently.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_Electron_Aberration-corrected_Microscope

    cheers,
    Jamie
     
  3. Jamie M

    Jamie M Guest

    I saw a strange lens recently too, for terahertz light, it is the same
    shape as a glass convex lens, but it is made out of teflon, I guess it
    works by changing the permeability and permittivity of free space?

    cheers,
    Jamie
     
  4. Guest

    IBM was going to do direct-write E-beam lithography. They even spent $1B on
    their own synchrotron (the only privately owned synchrotron) for the source.
    ....then some wise-ass invented the phase-shift mask.
     
  5. Guest

    Of course not. You can't change free space. You can make it not so free,
    though. ;-)
     
  6. Guest

    You're right. <slap!>

    They were doing direct-write E-Beam before that (for a while, anyway).
     
  7. Jamie M

    Jamie M Guest

    Hi,

    The throughput for e-beam is limited because it is scanning instead of
    projecting a 2D image, but if you project a 2D electron beam image
    the throughput could be the same as photo lithography and the beam
    current density equal (or less) than scanning e-beam.

    cheers,
    Jamie
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-