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What to use to clean old, dirty pots?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Norm Dresner, Oct 23, 2004.

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  1. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    Okay, SOS pads in the kitchen but what in the electronics lab?

    TIA
    Norm
     
  2. Craig Hart

    Craig Hart Guest

    WD40 is the universal cure.
     
  3. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | WD40 is the universal cure.

    Replaced by or followed by tuner cleaner. WD40 is rather nasty. There is/was
    a version of tuner cleaner that screwed on the thread of the pot to force
    the stuff inside.

    N
     
  4. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    Oh no! Not this old chestnut again...........

    There was a thread on this subject back in August so just search for
    WD40 in this group.
     
  5. Art

    Art Guest

    I have previously used a product called Lubra Clean with very good results.
    Requires access to the physical opening on the side of the control
    assemblies to allow one to put the cleaning materials inside. I normally
    used a small screwdriver or a snapped off wooden "Q-Tip" to apply the Lubra
    Clean to the slider or wiper assemblies.
     
  6. Dan Whelan

    Dan Whelan Guest

    Hi Norm,

    Please don't use WD40. It has it's place but not here. WD40 it leaves
    behind an oily resudue....and it smells bad. Not the nicest thing to
    smell in a house.

    I would use a fiberglass brush (looks like a retractable pen) and some
    contact cleaner (MG Chemicals). No residue it left behind.

    Most of the cleaning can be done with the fiberglass brush alone. I
    recommend using this because a metal brush will leave scratches and
    gouges on whatever you're cleaning. The fiberglass brush doesn't.

    Of you'd rather not open up the pots and use the brush, then just
    spray the contact cleaner inside.

    Dan
     
  7. Dave Walsh

    Dave Walsh Guest


    All you need is here,
    www.caig.com

    Used in the pro audio world where clean pots are essential.

    Dave W.
     
  8. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    I'll look for it when I get to the local "electronics" store but I'll
    never visit the website again -- I have a "thing" about people who feel that
    they have to play their music on my computer.

    BTW, back in the '70s IIRC there was a product called (something like)
    Cramolin. What ever happened to it? The EPA?

    Thanks for the suggestion anyway

    Norm
     
  9. Cramolin is now DeOxit. Caig is the US source. Still the best that I have
    found.

    Leonard
     
  10. WEBPA

    WEBPA Guest

    WD40 is the universal cure.WD40 is a wax disssolved in a mixture of solvents. It will eventually
    dissolved the resistive material inside many pots...thus permanently destroying
    the part.

    Hint: WD40 IS NOT A LUBRICANT. IT IS A WATER-DISPLACER ("WD"...GET IT)
    designed for corosion protection of ferous metals. WD40 IS USELESS AND
    COUNTERPRODUCTIVE FOR ANY OTHER APPLICATION.

    Go to an electronics store and purchase a can of spray-on contact cleaner (with
    or without lubricant for pots). There are at least dozens of different brand
    names.


    webpa
     
  11. RonKZ650

    RonKZ650 Guest

    WD40 is a wax disssolved in a mixture of solvents. It will eventually
    This has always been a unsubstantiated rumor in my opinion, others can
    disagree, mostly people that have never even used WD40, just read about the
    problems and relaying the rumors that have little fact.
    I'll tell my experience. Way back in 1978 when I started in the business we
    used WD40, never ever hurt a thing, then used commercial tunerwash, never hurt
    a thing, then when CFCs were taken out of tunerwash it was suddenly very risky
    to use because it would desolve certain plastics ruining parts. We went back to
    WD40 which I still use today although rarely do pots come into the picture with
    newer equipment.
    So in summary, I've cleaned many thousand pots and tuners with WD40 and I'd
    recommend it.
     
  12. WEBPA

    WEBPA Guest

    WD40 is a wax disssolved in a mixture of solvents. It will eventually
    I've cleaned dozens of pots, switches, and tuners (consumer parts and aerospace
    parts) with WD40 (20 years ago). Stopped instantly when some of the parts
    began disintegrating, and others failed due to the goo (wax) left behind after
    the solvents evaporated.

    I also used to use WD40 to lubricate automotive parts...such as door hinges and
    latch/lock (not cylinders) mechanisms. Again, after a period of time, the goo
    build-up became horrendous, and the goo seems to be the world's most perfect
    dust/dirt attractor. After my truck's door latch mechanisms became virtually
    immobile, I removed them, soaked in kerosene, washed in soap and water, and
    then air-dried. This was almost 10 years ago. The doors feel and sound like
    new. I've done this with several vehicles mistakenly "lubricated" with WD40
    since, with the same results.

    If you haven't had similar results with WD40, then you have been very lucky.
    webpa
     
  13. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | I've cleaned dozens of pots, switches, and tuners (consumer parts and
    aerospace
    | parts) with WD40 (20 years ago). Stopped instantly when some of the parts
    | began disintegrating, and others failed due to the goo (wax) left behind
    after
    | the solvents evaporated.
    |
    | I also used to use WD40 to lubricate automotive parts...such as door
    hinges and
    | latch/lock (not cylinders) mechanisms. Again, after a period of time, the
    goo
    | build-up became horrendous, and the goo seems to be the world's most
    perfect
    | dust/dirt attractor. After my truck's door latch mechanisms became
    virtually
    | immobile, I removed them, soaked in kerosene, washed in soap and water,
    and
    | then air-dried. This was almost 10 years ago. The doors feel and sound
    like
    | new. I've done this with several vehicles mistakenly "lubricated" with
    WD40
    | since, with the same results.
    |
    | If you haven't had similar results with WD40, then you have been very
    lucky.

    If you can find 2-22 you'll find it works well. Otherwise I would use tuner
    cleaner, even the Radio Shack stuff. WD-40 is OK on rusty tractors and gate
    hinges.

    N
     
  14. joejoe

    joejoe Guest

    my mother was going around the house every six months with wd40
    spraying anything that turned. luv that gummy residue.

    I sprayed with LPS and that was that.
     
  15. Kirk S.

    Kirk S. Guest

    WD-40 is suitable for use as a glaze breaker oil in lawn mower engines. Do
    not use it on anything that you don't want dirty, dusty and gummy.

    Oh yeah, it doesn't free frozen bolts either...

    Kirk S.
     
  16. Guest

    Old time TV repair guy here.Worked in a TV shop in the 60's and now
    repair vintage electronics of all kinds(*except* TV's....don't like
    high voltages anymore!) in my home based shop.

    Many contact cleaners work well.Some are ridiculously overpriced
    because the field lends itself to what is called "perceived value
    marketing" and so few people understand chemical terms.

    Many TV shops used WD-40 on a regular basis.I tested it
    ***extensively*** and was unable to force it (even in purposely large
    quantities)to cause any significant residue build up.
    In conversations with the WD-40 people they agree that excessive use
    is not desirable in electronics but unless you use it every few weeks
    or so ,you won't get a waxy build up problem.Many old timer ham
    operators use WD-40 also.No problems even at high frequencies.

    CRC contact cleaner and even CRC brake drum cleaner will work and
    leave no residue.
    Deantured (not isopropyl medical) alcohol works fairly well.

    No cause for alarm with WD-40 though in any normal amount of usage.

    Some very high priced contact cleaners consist of refined olive oil
    with a fancy sounding name(Oleac acid)and traces of surfacants and
    lighter(naptha) fluid and can cost you $20.00 a can.I cannot break a
    trust by giving the product name in that case as a friend plans to
    market it under a different name.
    Malcolm Leonard
     
  17. Caig De-Oxit for potentiometers and controls. It's believed by many techs
    that WD-40 will degrade the carbon elements of potentiometers.

    Mark Z.
     
  18. Wild Bill

    Wild Bill Guest

    You can find lots of praise for Caig products in the SER archives. I've
    never been fond of flooding a pot or switch with an aerosol can.. I use a
    small plastic bottle with a needle tip for the DeOxit liquid.
    I started using the Caig products several decades ago, and they're so
    effective that I haven't felt the need to try other products to see if
    they're as good or better.

    Flooding will generally wash away the original lubricant in the bushing of a
    panel pot, and cause the adjustment to feel loose.

    I've never been a fan of the WD40 product for any application, and
    particularly not for any electro-mechanical application. I know that to a
    lot of folks, it's a miracle in a can.

    Cheers
    WB
    ...............
     
  19. NSM

    NSM Guest

    Older than you? We used to use carbon tet, then later trichloroethane. It's
    a wonder my liver still works!

    N
     
  20. quietguy

    quietguy Guest

    Me too - CRC contact cleaner always did the trick on pots and tuner
    contacts

    David
     
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