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PC pay Capacitor I believe to be bad. Looking for a replacement but need guidance.

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by LL406, May 4, 2021.

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  1. LL406

    LL406

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    May 4, 2021
    I have a computer power supply that suddenly stopped working after quite a while. Found what I believe to be the culprit as the capacitor has a bulging top. I understand it to be a 2200uF 10v capacitor but not sure what other markings mean. Does anybody know what any of the other markings on the capacitor mean? It says GF(M) , B 7 C , 105°CH . It is a Samxon capacitor from a Corsair psu. Couldn’t find any information about it so not sure what would be a proper replacement. Sorry to bother and appreciate any help. Thanks.
     

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    Last edited: May 4, 2021
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    2,593
    Nov 17, 2011
    2200 µF, 10 V, 10 5 ° is the information you need to buy a replacement. And, of course, size and pinout need to match.
    But:
    If the new capacitor is smaller -> no problem. Technology has advanced, modern capacitors are often smaller.
    If the new capacitor has a higher voltage rating (e.g. 16 V) -> no problem. Only do not use one rated under 10 V.

    Here's an example from Amazon.
     
  3. LL406

    LL406

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    May 4, 2021
    an old dell power supply I have does have 2200uf 16v 105 capacitors I could use. Just have to ask why higher voltage would be okay? Being cautious is all. Also, thank you very much!
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,313
    2,593
    Nov 17, 2011
    Its what the capacitor can sustain. If it can sustain more than it is loaded with, that is no problem.

    You can load a loaf of bread onto a truck, but not a ton of stone into a limousine, although truck and limousine are both cars.
     
  5. LL406

    LL406

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    May 4, 2021
    Gotcha! Appreciate you taking your time to help Harald Kapp. Thanks.
     
  6. dave9

    dave9

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    288
    Mar 5, 2017
    That is already a fairly tall height to diameter ratio capacitor, so the 16V cap is probably larger diameter, and may also have a wider lead spacing, 3.5mm vs 5.0mm. Since it is an older (aged) PSU, if it is not larger diameter, it's probably not a high quality capacitor. One trademark of poor quality caps that historically proved to be failure prone, was too high a capacitance value for the can size relative to higher quality major (Japanese, etc instead of Chinese) brands.

    Regardless, you really don't want to use a capacitor out of an old power supply. Output filter caps in switching PSU like these have a hard life which is why it failed, so you should get a very low ESR, new capacitor, and consider replacing all the output filter caps while you're at it, so it doesn't just have a similar failure next time on the 12V rail rather than 5V or 3V.

    BTW, you don't even need a 10V cap. As mentioned above this is 5V or 3V rail so a 6.3V cap would work, then get 16V replacements for those on the 12V rail.

    If located in the US, I'd pick out of these suggestions on the following link based on diameter, lead spacing, and next highest voltage over the power rail it filters (of course there are many major brands of very low ESR caps that would be suitable). Digikey has no minimum order limit and reasonable USPS shipping rates, but any major discrete electronics supply house would carry something suitable in a top tier brand.

    https://www.digikey.com/en/products...4tL1EABaCiqoWULjevJOAVVJ2Yak9AUConSkKztJEDWgA

    On a side note, I never realized I could paste a picture from my windows clipboard into a post! I accidentally did that intending to post the above link, and of course them removed it because not appropriate to the topic.
     
  7. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,313
    2,593
    Nov 17, 2011
    Yes, it would work, but at a rather small margin (what with overvoltage etc.). 10 V or more is a reliable rating for a 5 V rail. The capacitor will also last longer not being stressed near its limit.
     
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