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Help with Load center

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Kissi Asiedu, Mar 14, 2005.

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  1. Kissi Asiedu

    Kissi Asiedu Guest

    I would like to know what the maximum voltage rating of each bus in a single
    or three phase load center. Can anyone help?
     
  2. SQLit

    SQLit Guest

    The OEM I used to work for, rated load centers at 300 volts. Panelboards
    could go up to 600 volts. I do not remember seeing a load center rated for
    480 volts. Mostly because the breakers are a lot larger.

    Your question is a little vague. I do hope your definition and mine of a
    load center are the same.
     
  3. Kissi Asiedu

    Kissi Asiedu Guest

    I wanted to know if I could use a load center rated at 120/240V in a foreign
    country where each leg of hot entering the load center is 220V.
     
  4. Brian

    Brian Guest

    300v or 600v depending your application and specs. on the print.


    I would like to know what the maximum voltage rating of each bus in a single
    or three phase load center. Can anyone help?
     
  5. Basically NO.

    The circuit breakers you would buy in the USA for a load center
    rated at 120/240V would be rated only to break 120 volts per pole.
    For 240-volt loads, a 2-pole circuit breaker is used.

    Most European circuit breakers I have seen are rated for
    300 volts per pole and are larger as a result.
    Bill Kaszeta
    Photovoltaic Resources Int'l
    Tempe Arizona USA
     
  6. Beachcomber

    Beachcomber Guest

    If by "foreign" you mean Europe or the countries that follow the
    European 220-230 V. 50 Hz standard, be aware that the systems are very
    different as is the equipment that is designed for them.

    The North American "Edison" system is typically 120/240 V. 60 Hz
    single phase with a center tapped neutral at the secondary of the
    service transformer. This transformer is typically pole or pad
    mounted.

    The advantages of this system are as follows:

    1. Safety - No voltage over the nominal 120 V. to ground appears on
    any conductor entering the house.

    2. Versatility - Dual voltages 120/240 are available. 120 for
    lighting and small appliance loads. 240 V. for the heaver appliances,
    water heaters, dryers, range, air handler, etc.

    3. Efficiency - The neutral carries only the difference current
    between the two hot legs, thus giving less voltage drop (that of a 240
    V. circuit) on the 120 volt circuits.

    4. Economical (for the power company) - Only one hot primary and one
    neutral are needed to serve distant house and remote farms. It is not
    necessary to run 3 phase conductors as is the common practice in
    Europe and other lands although in North America, 3-phase power is
    readily available for farms and businesses that need it.

    In England, for example, you have the "other" system where you have
    one hot wire running at 230 Volts or so, one neutral, and one ground
    wire. The panel boxes are designed differently to accommodate this
    type of configuration with one large hot buss instead of two.

    If a typical 120/240 USA cb panel were used on the European system,
    for example, it would have to be fed by two (in phase hot wires). The
    neutral buss would carry double the current (instead of just the
    difference current) All the breakers would have to be rated for 240
    and would have to be single pole- non ganged and operable safely on 50
    Hz. Not sure that all these parts exist and if it would pass local
    codes. I don't think so.

    Beachcomber
     
  7. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Bill how do you confuse "bus" with "circuit breakers"?!?


    Basically NO.

    The circuit breakers you would buy in the USA for a load center
    rated at 120/240V would be rated only to break 120 volts per pole.
    For 240-volt loads, a 2-pole circuit breaker is used.

    Most European circuit breakers I have seen are rated for
    300 volts per pole and are larger as a result.
    Bill Kaszeta
    Photovoltaic Resources Int'l
    Tempe Arizona USA
     
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