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recomendations on TVs

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Dave Walsh, Dec 12, 2004.

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  1. Dave Walsh

    Dave Walsh Guest

    What would you guys recomend as a good TV. From a servicing point of view
    and from a longevity angle. What are your thoughts on Ferguson?, Just
    spotted them in a shop, didnt know they were still on the go.
    Im looking for a large screen TV, something like a 32" that is 4:3. or
    failing that a widescreen recomendation would be great.
    Im an audio tech, and my only delving into TV land has been using them
    onstage as a prop.

    I apologise if Im posting in the wrong place.

    Thanks in advance for any replies

    Dave
     
  2. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    I would stick with names such as Sony, Panasonic, Hitachi, JVC, and some
    models of Toshiba. These would be the best in the industry from our
    experience. You pay for what you get! For the higher end models, there
    are many years of parts support and service in case there is a failure.
    These sets generaly last a very long time, in relation to the others at
    the lower cost.

    Take care that with the lower cost sets, they are considered disposable.
    Their expected life span is about 2 to 3 years. There is generaly no
    after warranty service, and no parts support for the lower end sets. The
    higher cost sets should last about 5 to 8 years. The higher end sets
    will also give better performance, including more accurate picture
    reproduction.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ======


    What would you guys recomend as a good TV. From a servicing point of
    view
    and from a longevity angle. What are your thoughts on Ferguson?, Just
    spotted them in a shop, didnt know they were still on the go.
    Im looking for a large screen TV, something like a 32" that is 4:3. or
    failing that a widescreen recomendation would be great.
    Im an audio tech, and my only delving into TV land has been using them
    onstage as a prop.

    I apologise if Im posting in the wrong place.

    Thanks in advance for any replies

    Dave
     
  3. Only 5-8? My last set, an old Philips, lasted for 12 years before
    I finally retired it.

    I fully expect our two-year old JVC set to do the same, if not
    better. Once it goes, I'm going to give serious thought to buying a
    video projector, and mounting a nice reflective screen for it on the
    appropriate wall.

    Keep the peace(es).


    --
    Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
    (Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
    kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
    "If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
    with surreal ports?"
     
  4. Eric

    Eric Guest

    stay away from Panasonic if you not a service agent of them you can not get
    circuit diagrams..


    What would you guys recomend as a good TV. From a servicing point of view
    and from a longevity angle. What are your thoughts on Ferguson?, Just
    spotted them in a shop, didnt know they were still on the go.
    Im looking for a large screen TV, something like a 32" that is 4:3. or
    failing that a widescreen recomendation would be great.
    Im an audio tech, and my only delving into TV land has been using them
    onstage as a prop.

    I apologise if Im posting in the wrong place.

    Thanks in advance for any replies

    Dave
     
  5. Kevin Ross

    Kevin Ross Guest

    I am only scanning this newsgroup because of another issue but I have a
    2-year and 2-month old JVC (26 month) that I have had to put in the shop
    because (apparently) the vertical IC went out. I have been waiting more than
    2 months for the repair because the shop cannot get the part. They tried
    generic parts but those parts fail after a few minutes (Or so I am told by
    the shop). So I second the advice on paying for a better TV. ( I have a JVC
    AV-27D302). If anyone thinks that I am being steered wrongly please let me
    know.

    Thanks,
    Kevin Ross


     
  6. Wimpy TV's - the lot of'em. :)
    Our first color TV from 32 years ago still plugs along at the foot
    of our bed. It's a Midland International (K.C., KS) Model 15-213.
    Still good color, good reception, and good sound with OTA usage.

    I know... The name _and_ the model number would lead one to belive it
    is/was a Radio Shack (Tandy way back then) TV. But, not so. I
    remember buying it at Monkey Wards on South Broadway in Denver in 1972.
    The TV is a 15" (as measured diagonally to the edge of the crt under
    the _white_ plastic case) and I think that is the "15" seen in the
    model number.

    I repaired it once about 15 years ago -- a cold solder joint.
    Wow! A cold solder joint problem after 15 years in use!

    Regards,
    Jonesy
     
  7. Of course you can. Like most other companies you just buy it. A number of
    distributors can supply them if you can't buy direct from Panasonic.

    Leonard
     
  8. Sounds strange for a vertical chip. Most are very easily available. What
    is the part number?

    Leonard

     
  9. Guest

    In Europe, all recent JVC TV sets seem to be made by Vestel (a budget
    brand). Smaller Panasonic and JVC sets were sometimes made by Onwa or
    Daewoo...
    I am afraid more and more brands are considering every picture tube
    TV (as opposed to plasma or LCD) being low cost nowadays...
     
  10. Guest

    Ferguson is a Thomson brand. That means you can either get lucky, or you
    will be throwing the set out in a few years.
     
  11. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Depends on the usage, personally every TV I own is more than 10 years old
    now and still working fine, but they go days at a time without being turned
    on.
     
  12. Kim

    Kim Guest

    Why don't you take a look at Consumers Reports Magazine. Every year they
    rate TVs, and show repair histories of brands.
     
  13. Why don't you take a look at Consumers Reports Magazine. Every year they
    I don't consider Consumer Reports a very reliable source for electronics
    information.

    Sometimes, they get lucky. But most of the time, they don't know what they're
    talking about.

    For instance, they consider Sanyo sets the most reliable. Those things are
    built cheaply and don't live up to the Consumer Reports statistics.

    They did get one thing right, though. Apex players are the most unreliable in
    general when compared to other players. But, their reviews of various models
    are rather rudimentary and don't discuss specifics, some very important which
    can help to explain how various players can have picture quality differences or
    internal construction quality. - Reinhart
     
  14. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    The nice thing about Apex players though is that when they do fail it's
    usually a simple matter to repair them. I replaced a cap in mine and it's
    been going strong ever since, works much better than the older Sony I have
    downstairs and it plays just about everything I throw at it.
     
  15. The nice thing about Apex players though is that when they do fail it's
    Not always.

    I've dealt with repairs on these cheapie DVD players.

    One was a simple repair: replace a shorted bridge diode and the fuse in the
    power supply.

    Another wasn't so simple: worn optical pickup in the DVS branded IDE drive.
    Replaced the whole drive with a LiteOn computer IDE DVD-ROM drive, but had to
    figure out a way to mount it in place.

    Of course, I'm seeing more of these cheap DVD players and TV/DVD combo units
    use these DVS drives. From what I've seen so far, they typically last about 1
    year, 2 years if you're lucky.

    And quite a few have problems that are simply not worth the trouble to repair.
    A Norcent that went brain dead for no reason at all. All it does is glow the
    green power LED on the front, but does nothing else. A write-off as "not
    recommended for repair" as these things can be bought cheaper than paying for a
    repair (if you can even find non-standard parts to do the repair to begin
    with.)

    And the biggest problem is with picture quality. Now, on first glance, they
    look okay. But, the warts show up when you start to measure them. Most have a
    horrid high frequency roll-off on the video, usually in several decibels which
    progress further downward the higher you go in the curve, which results in a
    softer looking video, especially with a lot of fine details. Sometimes, the
    IRE is either too hot or too cold and usually never dead on, resulting in
    rather poor contrast. Finally, progressive scan cheapies don't do the job of
    deinterlacing very well, especially with 3:2 pulled video from telecine
    transfers of 24 FPS film. Some cheapie models even have a bigger tendency to
    introduce macroblocking noise in the video than most brand name DVD players.

    Sorry, but I prefer a good balance on reliability and performance, which means
    you have to spend a little more on a name brand that will likely have a decent
    drive, a decent power supply, a decent decoder, a decent deinterlacer, a decent
    analogue section, and decent parts which make the whole works tick. - Reinhart
     
  16. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Reinhart

    Depends what you're looking for, personally I like the Apex players because
    of the ease of modifying them to play imports, as well as vcd's and dvd's of
    my own creation. A while back I copied some old home movies from VHS to DVD,
    MUCH easier to store and deal with, the Sony refuses to play them but they
    work just fine in the cheap Apex.
     
  17. A while back I copied some old home movies from VHS to DVD,
    That's funny. My 3rd generation Sony DVP-S360 plays home-made DVDs just fine.
    - Reinhart
     
  18. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Certainly some Sony's are very good, mine is quite old, but still I've been
    quite happy with cheaper ones.
     
  19. Certainly some Sony's are very good, mine is quite old, but still I've been
    Eh. Your cup of tea.

    All I'm doing is giving my experienced opinion for anyone's evaluation.

    What others do with that info is up to them. - Reinhart
     
  20. Guest

    CR just reports info from their survey. They're just reporting
    what maybe 100,000 survey respondants said -- whether true or
    not. Asking on this newsgroup gives the opinion of maybe three
    people (instead of 100,000). FWIW.

    Mike

    P.S. - I agree they often don't know what they're talking about.
    Biggest problem is that they don't have the "tastes" of
    an enthusiast of whatever the subject is. They have
    the mentality that a Big Mac (tm) is a gourmet meal (which
    unfortunately is probably a good fit for most subscribers
    who are looking for low-end cheapie stuff that isn't
    outright bad).
     
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