Connect with us

IR transmitter/reciever viewing angles question.

Discussion in 'Electronic Components' started by Rusty Magic, May 12, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Rusty Magic

    Rusty Magic Guest

    Hi all,

    I need to find out what kind of viewing angles are common in IR
    emmitters/recievers. I check the Radio Shack ones, and it seems to be
    45 degrees. 12.5 degrees on either side of centreline. Is this the
    biggest possible? Or are ones that transmit 90 degrees manufactured?

    Thanks.
     
  2. The IRDA standard is 30 degrees. This would be for most
    transceivers designed for laptops, PDAs, cell phones, etc. The
    viewing angle is deliberately limited in order to avoid interference
    between multiple users.
     
  3. Methinks you meant 22.5 degrees on either side. The wider the beam, the
    lower the 'brightness' so it's self-defeating if you want the beam to
    function at a distance. The best thing to do to siden the beam is to
    reflect it off a curved first surface mirror to spread it out. The
    curve will be convex.
     
  4. Methinks you meant 22.5 degrees on either side. The wider the beam, the
    lower the 'brightness' so it's self-defeating if you want the beam to
    function at a distance. The best thing to do to widen the beam is to
    reflect it off a curved first surface mirror to spread it out. The
    curve will be convex.
     
  5. "Watson A.Name \"Watt Sun - the Dark Remover\""
    Indeed. We got some amazing distances when modulating one of those
    (visible red) laser diode modules with an IR remote, but the beam
    width was pretty small... 8*)
     
  6. Rusty Magic

    Rusty Magic Guest

    Thanks for the info.
    I got my numbers mixed up, I meant 22.5 degrees on either side of
    centre. Anyway..

    Darn, I was hoping to have 6 emitters on 6 sides of a small cube (say,
    a die), and if each covered 90 degrees (without a cone restricting the
    angle, as in remote control units for tv's and vcr's), the room could
    be covered. With the same setup with recievers, with a circuit board
    and chip determining which emitter recieves the emission.
    30 degrees just won't cut it.

    Thanks again.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-