Connect with us

Compare 22 watt CFL to 20 watt florescent bulb

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by DLC, Oct 30, 2010.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. DLC

    DLC Guest

    I am just starting to wire my new weekend cabin and I am wondering about
    using 22 watt CFL or 20 watt florescent bulbs for area lighting.

    My inverter produces modified sine ware, if this is relevant.

    I have used CFL in my other weekend cabin with no problems, but the new
    one is larger.

    If the power usage is similar, I would prefer the florescent bulbs for
    area and CFL for spot lighting.

    Any one done a comparison?
     
  2. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    I have installed most;y CFL bulbs in my newly built home.

    I believe you will find most will tell you that CFL bulbs do not last long,
    despite all the BS about them. I would go with what you said, hands down. I
    have had about 40% of my Phi;;i[s CFLs burn out within one year.

    The long tube bulbs seem to give proper light immediately and the CFL ones
    take minutes to "warm-up" to temperature. If they weren't so cheap to run I
    would remove most of them, where I could. Get the tubes with electronic
    ballasts. It became public a few years ago that the ballasts were a huge
    concern on energy consumption, too.


    I am just starting to wire my new weekend cabin and I am wondering about
    using 22 watt CFL or 20 watt florescent bulbs for area lighting.

    My inverter produces modified sine ware, if this is relevant.

    I have used CFL in my other weekend cabin with no problems, but the new
    one is larger.

    If the power usage is similar, I would prefer the florescent bulbs for
    area and CFL for spot lighting.

    Any one done a comparison?
     
  3. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    I have purchased some ones that have a quick warm-up time and work well.
    Apparently Phillips CFL units are not them...well the later ones purchased.
    There isn't much GE bulbs around here but I intend to look next time.

    I purchased mostly 6500K bulbs for my home at first but eventually foundthem
    too "cold" for general usage.
    The 5000K are a little warmer but appear to have a red glow to them.
    The 3000K seem to be passible but hard to get the second time around.
    The 2700K appear to warm and yellowish for me, depending on the fixture.

    I find most CFLs very crappy light in overhead pot fixtures.

    I have a 14W LED over my sink now but it appears to be overheating and cuts
    out the thermal O/L in the fixture and then retriggers the motion detector
    **SIGH**. The single LED source has the old halogen problem with a pinpoint
    lightsource. Lots of bright by appearance but hard to actually see due to
    glitter on everything. (unless buying a diamond ring...LOL)

    Time for an eighth motion detector. I have run into some crap with that
    too.



    I recently purchased some 40/9 watt 450 lumen small globe(spiral
    inside) GE energy smart 2700k soft white blubs for the bathroom @$5ea
    at Target,

    They turn on instantly, with 60-70% brightness the moment the switch
    is turned on!!!!

    (After trying out one, I went back and purchased 3 more)..

    They have a limited five year warrantee.. (@4hours day).

    These are the fastest turn on CFL bulbs I've ever seen on the market.
    Perfect for bathroom usage,.

    Moral to the story.. keep on looking..
     
  4. vaughn

    vaughn Guest

    Actually, I prefer slow-on lamps for my bathroom. Reason? It's for when I go
    in there in the middle of the night. With instant-on bulbs, I find it blinding.

    Vaughn
     
  5. We have a multi-lamp fixture in the bathroom, so we've mixed
    and matched the incandescents with the CFLs. We get about
    one half brightness immediately, with the rest ramping up
    over the next minute.

    Best of both worlds....
     
  6. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    That is a good solution to dimmers and two lead motion detectors, also. A
    smaller incandescent can be used with the majority of the lumens CFL.



    We have a multi-lamp fixture in the bathroom, so we've mixed
    and matched the incandescents with the CFLs. We get about
    one half brightness immediately, with the rest ramping up
    over the next minute.

    Best of both worlds....


    In <iaqfe5$34t$-september.org> "vaughn"
    Actually, I prefer slow-on lamps for my bathroom. Reason? It's for when I
    go
    in there in the middle of the night. With instant-on bulbs, I find it
    blinding.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-