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Schematics for My TV

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Jeff Stephens, Sep 23, 2003.

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  1. I am trying to find a schematic for my Sanyo DS25530 TV. I found
    Sam's fotofacts online, but they want $20-30 depending on whether
    you download or order hardcopy. An email to Sanyo generated a reply
    that gave me an 1-800 number to call for parts.

    It seems to me that it would be a simple matter to make these schematics
    available online for free. In Sanyo's case they already do this for owner's
    manuals. In this day and age, I would expect these to be available at
    the manufacturer's website in .pdf format. Is this an example of price
    goudging?

    Regards,
    Jeff Stephens

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---------------
    Many media people have been journalism and/or communication majors. Most of
    these programs have little analytical rigor. They are a dumping ground for
    the most ill-prepared students.

    Walter E. Williams, PhD
    Professor of Economics
    George Mason University
     
  2. Your large public library may subscribe toe Sams' in which case it
    will only cost you for copying. Or, is that too expensive? :)

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: The email address in this message header may no longer work. To
    contact me, please use the Feedback Form at repairfaq.org. Thanks.
     
  3. Gary Tait

    Gary Tait Guest

    Whereas On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 12:49:35 GMT, "Jeff Stephens"
    And it would be a simple matter to put MP3s on line, and elimeinate
    the trouble of record stores and such.

    The fact is, that it costs money to produce those manuals, above the
    finite cost of printing/shipping them.

    -- Gary J. Tait . Email is at yahoo.com ; ID:classicsat
     
  4. Hey guys, lighten up. I don't think it is unreasonable to expect to get
    these
    for free. If necessary, the mfrs. could up the price of the TV a couple of
    bucks and the cost would be included in the price. Then, a simple matter
    to post the file to their website. I don't need a hardcopy of the owner's
    manual which came with my TV as long as I can download it from the
    internet. For those who don't have a computer or internet access you can
    go to your local library and use theirs.

    Regards,
    Jeff S
     
  5. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    I agree that service manuals should be freely available in digital
    format from the manufacturer's website. The cost of paper manuals
    often prohibits the economical repair of consumer goods, which results
    in these goods being prematurely discarded. Pester your local Greenie
    for a change to the legislation.


    - Franc Zabkar
     
  6. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    Phoo-ey! It wasn't that long ago that schematics were included with *every*
    TV...at least the ones I had occasion to deal with as a
    consumer/experimenter.

    It's not like just 'anyone' can take advantage of one, anyway, or that it
    really costs anything to include it in the price of the set.

    jak
     
  7. What's to lighten up about with that comment? It captures the entire
    idea behind this.
    The reason why stuff is so cheaply made nowadays is because consumers
    voted, with their buying choices. If you add cost, even with added
    value, you'll alienate the majority of customers. How many people do
    you really think will ever want a schematic for their consumer
    electronics. It doesn't make sense, common, or marketing, for the
    manufacturers to do this...so, they don't.

    Tom
     
  8. Nigel

    Nigel Guest

    No, it's a public liability issue.

    In these litigious times, inclusion of a circuit diagram with the set, or
    making it freely available on the manufacturer's website could be seen as an
    invitation and endorsement of 'have a go' repairers, who would undoubtedly
    sue the manufacturer in the event of a death or serious injury involving
    themselves or their family. It would also provide even less incentive for
    authorised repair shops to invest in staff, training and equipment in what
    is already a tough trade, not to mention the increased numbers of bodged
    repairs caused and hassle that goes with them.



    I am trying to find a schematic for my Sanyo DS25530 TV. I found
    Sam's fotofacts online, but they want $20-30 depending on whether
    you download or order hardcopy. An email to Sanyo generated a reply
    that gave me an 1-800 number to call for parts.

    It seems to me that it would be a simple matter to make these schematics
    available online for free. In Sanyo's case they already do this for owner's
    manuals. In this day and age, I would expect these to be available at
    the manufacturer's website in .pdf format. Is this an example of price
    goudging?

    Regards,
    Jeff Stephens

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ---------------
    Many media people have been journalism and/or communication majors. Most of
    these programs have little analytical rigor. They are a dumping ground for
    the most ill-prepared students.

    Walter E. Williams, PhD
    Professor of Economics
    George Mason University
     
  9. Gary Tait

    Gary Tait Guest

    Whereas On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 17:34:41 -0500, "jakdedert"
    I don't know when that was, but the most I've ever seen in televisions
    was a parts layout diagram, and that was before the all-in-one main
    boards. True, I have seen them glued inside import radios from the
    1970s, and some CB gear, and Tandy was at one time good for including
    a schematic with some of their gear. I have also seen them reithr
    glued to the back of large appliances, or tucked into the control
    panel.
    It does, printing and gluing, not to mention liability.
    -- Gary J. Tait . Email is at yahoo.com ; ID:classicsat
     
  10. Gary Tait

    Gary Tait Guest

    Whereas On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 07:43:41 +1000, Franc Zabkar
    Sure, if they ban paper manuals, there is still the issue of free or
    not, which is a separate issue.
    -- Gary J. Tait . Email is at yahoo.com ; ID:classicsat
     
  11. Last I saw was in a Mitsubishi from around 1985. A wonderful, high quality,
    foldout schematic. Not sure if it was taped inside or included with the
    customer information. Too bad that TV hasn't needed service. :)

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: The email address in this message header may no longer work. To
    contact me, please use the Feedback Form at repairfaq.org. Thanks.
     
  12. TV Fixer1

    TV Fixer1 Guest

    I would like to see other mfr's follow Hitachi's lead on this; after
    registering with Hitachi as a repair site (free), you can access all of their
    service manuals online, and download them in PDF format, suitable for burning
    to CD ROM. The companies have to produce the manuals anyways, and they all have
    web sites, so this seems like a good way to go. It will also encourage more
    independant repair shops to repair their products. Here in Chattanooga, Sony's
    lack of cooperation with us has resulted in NO service on out of warranty
    Sony's within 100 miles.
     
  13. Ian Molton

    Ian Molton Guest

    Damn the US and its litigous culture :(

    people over here just dont think like that yet we still dont get
    diagrams because the manufacturers are scared.
     
  14. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    Seems like the a few GE sets I worked on in the 80's had the schematic in a
    little box that snapped into the back of the set. I don't remember the
    model #, but these were famous for bad solder joints where coils and
    transformers were soldered directly to the board. I fixed at least two of
    them with the same problem in the same location.

    As far as printing cost is concerned....really?!! Come on.

    And liability issues would be?

    jak
     
  15. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    I just don't 'buy' it. A simple schematic is going to be useless to anyone
    other than a person with at least 'some' technical knowledge; while on the
    other hand, it would be invaluable to a person who could read it. Providing
    it is going to cost--what?--maybe $0.002...the cost of the paper? After
    all, it's not like they didn't have the original to copy. A schematic most
    certainly *must* be drawn in order to manufacture the device in the first
    place...and it's not like the manufacturers are going to provide any support
    to a product which has gone defective anyway...especially after it's past
    it's 'service life.'

    Where's the liability? There are already placarded warnings on the back of
    every electrical device against opening up the unit unless one has the
    requisite technical know-how.

    I'm convinced it's the companies *not wanting* things to be fixed; in favor
    of replacing them with brand-new devices. After all, they don't make any
    money if someone fixes their TV as opposed to buying a new one.

    jak
     
  16. gonzo

    gonzo Guest

    When you consider that even burglars sue if they are injured when
    breaking into your property, and idiots sue (and win) because they
    spill hot coffee on themselves, you cannot blame the makers if they
    discourage people from attempting repairs themselves. That said, I
    regard these warning notices as a challenge, and open the bloody
    thing anyway ."No user servicable parts inside" Never know until
    you look, lol.
     
  17. Gary Tait

    Gary Tait Guest

    Whereas On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 14:02:44 -0500, "jakdedert"
    The liability is in that someone who thinks they know what they are
    doinf futzing it up, and either burning something down, or injuring
    someone, or themselves.
     
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