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Just making sure

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Bluestribute, Dec 5, 2011.

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  1. Bluestribute

    Bluestribute

    8
    0
    Nov 15, 2011
    http://www.tonepad.com/getFileInfo.asp?id=119

    First off, I have to use an IC with 14 legs not 16 as it has. Anyways, I just want to make sure I'm reading this schematic correctly (making the Tube Fuzz)

    Connect .1µf capacitor to leg 14 of the IC
    Connect 10pf capacitor also to the IC (?)
    Connect 100k resistor to 10pf capacitor
    Connect the 10pf and 100k to the 1M resistor
    Connect 10pf to leg 13 of the IC

    That's how I've been interpreting this (I won't list all connections I "see", that's just the first part) and wanna make sure I'm doing it correctly . . . I know the dots are where you connect the wires but what if there is no dot, and what if there isn't something on the other side of it (ie look at the 10pf capacitor and also the 100k/.1µf connection)? That's the main problem I'm having
     
  2. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010
    Pins 14-15 and 9-10. But you could just as well use 5-4 7-6 11-12. The chip has multiple inverters in one package, the design implements two of these inverters and leaves the other four unused. Which two he chose to use was probably dependent upon his PCB, where it was easiest based on chip placement or not. The point is, one inverter is just as good as the next.

    where do you see pin 13?

    the 10pf and 1M variable resistor are hooked in parallel to pins 14-15, with a 100k resistor hooked in series between the 10pf and 1M on pin 14 (the input of the inverter)

    The dots are where more then 2 component leads are connected. this is to clarify that all the components connected to that dot are indeed connected(together). Where you see two components that are hooked together, but no dot doesn't mean they aren't connected, just that this is implied. You could just as well draw a dot where ever you see two components connected, Would still mean the exact same thing.

    Read the diagram as literal as you can. If one side of a component is hooked to another side of a component then you need to repeat that on your prototype board. Make the connections and then double check your work. They must be exact if you wish to make what is in that schematic
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2011
  3. Bluestribute

    Bluestribute

    8
    0
    Nov 15, 2011
    Oh, ok. So lemme just run it like this to see if I fully understand:

    Where the "shape changes" (ie resistor symbol changes to capacitor symbol), I would connect directly. Where there are dots, that is like an "intersection" where everything meets, and I would connect the appropriate component to the wire. So the first one I looked at would be:

    Leg of IC connected to .1µf capacitor. I also connect that "intersection" to the 10pf capacitor and 100k resistor at their own "intersection". So there's a place where the 100k and 10pf are connected, and that common area is then connected to the leg/.1µf common area.

    And if the legs touch, I still need wire to connect them, right? 'Cause I forgot to get some at Radioshack so I took out an old amp that doesn't work and started cutting it up to get some wire . . .

    And the 13 was a typo lol. But now it doesn't matter since I know where I'm beginning to read wrong.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2011
  4. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010
    No, as long as the two components are touching in some physical sense they you don't need a wire. This is why breadboards are so nice for prototyping. Pretty much just plug in your components and viola, no soldering or clipping stuff together. Radioshack sells breadboards!!! You put your chip dead center of the board(half pins on one side the other half on the other side) then start wiring in your other components.

    Most breadboards connect 5 holes in a row. So any component you connect to that row is in physical connection to anything else you plug into that row. http://msc-ks4technology.wikispaces.com/file/view/breadboardopen.jpg/39400002/breadboardopen.jpg
    Remember your end layout doesn't need to look anything like the schematic, just so long as every connection is exactly like the schematic. Hope that doesn't confuse you! :)

    Remember to think LITERAL. Go ahead and start putting it together, then take a picture and post it here. We will double check your work.
     
  5. Bluestribute

    Bluestribute

    8
    0
    Nov 15, 2011
    Ok sweet! I started soldering yesterday and was like "wait . . . ". Now I just have to check my current connections and add some wiring to some so this should be done . . . maybe this week? Or next (finals next week), And then I'll post it up since I can't test it yet =( (only one instrument cable, not two)

    And I was gonna get a breadboard but the components were a bit more than I was expecting, and since I HAVE done stuff like this before (albeit a while ago), I just kinda went straight for the perfboard instead =\
     
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