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jeopardy game design request

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], May 14, 2007.

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  1. Guest

    Hi All,

    I hope I am not way out of line posting in this forum, but it was the
    only one I found where I thought I could get some help.

    My 12-year-old son needs to build an electronics project. He has
    decided he would like to build a buzzer/light/switch like game of
    jeopardy; where the first person pressing a button will be allowed to
    answer the question. The wiring should not be advanced; as it is a
    grade-6 project.

    I am not an electrical engineer by any means, so determining the right
    combination/architecture of switches/lights/buzzers/relays/? - I
    cannot do. Can anyone provide some basic guidance to get us going?

    He wants to design it using a piece of wood as the board.

    Thanks, in advance,

    Richard
     
  2. On 14 May 2007 07:32:19 -0700, in sci.electronics.design
    a quick goog found this
    http://www.desmith.net/NMdS/Electronics/Jeopardy.html
    which may be a bit advanced, but it is just one circuit repeated many
    times.
    maybe a more thorough google would find something simpler


    martin
     
  3. MooseFET

    MooseFET Guest

    You are going to need something to prevent the second button from
    having any effect. How many buttons do you want to do? The usual
    number is 3.

    Can you solder electronic stuff?

    You can use relays to do the work but the cost will be kind of high.
    You can use logic but you will have to work on small stuff.

    See:
    www.digikey.com and search for: Solderless Breadboard

    I think that will get you the right stuff to let you avoid any need to
    solder onto small parts.

    I'm going to suggest that you use a couple of CD4013B ICs and a
    CD4078B.

    The nice thing about the CD40XX logic is that it can be powered by
    just a 9V battery. There will also be some transistors needed to make
    enough power to switch the buzzers.


    Take a look and see if it looks like something you can handle.
     
  4. Guest

    Hi there.

    Firstly, thanks for the replies!

    I am not that advanced in electronics, so you have to know who you are
    dealing with :)

    I found a SOLDERLESS BREADBOARD at the local source store (old
    radioshack here in Canada) -
    http://www.thesourcecc.com/estore/P...ine&category=PC+board/Sockets&product=2760169

    Can I use this? If so, care to tell me a little more?

    We have started to buy some parts and have the following:

    - some 20 guage Hook Up wire
    - momentary push-button switches
    - threaded base lamp holders and bulbs
    - double-AA battery holder with color-coded wire leads
    - some clips
    - mini buzzers

    I would appreciate any direction...and don't mind if we have to spend
    a little more $$$.

    Thanks,

    Richard

    P.s. we need to do this over the next 2 days :)
     
  5. A simple non-registered PAL could handle the logic, subject to the
    cautions listed below.

    Inputs: AButton, BButton, CButton, ClearButton (all pulled up and
    active low when pressed)
    Oututs: AFirst, BFirst, CFirst.

    Players A, B, C have their buttons, controller has Clear Button.
    Three indicators are connected to AFirst, BFirst, CFirst outputs.

    AFirst = /AButton * BButton * CButton * /BFirst * /CFirst *
    ClearButton
    + AFirst * ClearButton;

    BFirst = AButton * /BButton * CButton * /AFirst * /CFirst *
    ClearButton
    + BFirst * ClearButton;

    CFirst = AButton * BButton * /CButton * /AFirst * /BFirst *
    ClearButton
    + CFirst * ClearButton;

    This method is subject to race conditions between the player inputs,
    which might result in multiple "First" indications, or none at all.
    This is because there is unavoidable finite setup time for the logic
    and propagation delays in the signals being routed back into the
    decision matrix.
     
  6. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    As you are already at Google Groups
    ("The Usenet Archive")--this is Usenet; NOT Google Groups--
    a search would have turned up numerous times this has been asked:
    http://groups.google.com/groups/search?q=jeopardy+ingroup:sci.electronics&scoring=d

    http://groups.google.com/groups/sea...Walz+style.buzzer+OR+decision.maker&scoring=d
    To see the diagrams in a monospaced font,
    **More options** then **Show original**
    (or copy & paste into Notepad).
     
  7. Guest

    I did this...but all the ones I saw are are too complex for a Grade 6
    Science project...I am looking for the most basic version possible.

    Thanks,

    Richard
     
  8. Unfortunately this is not as simple as you might think.

    A google for (simple game show buzzer circuit) got a number of hits, home
    built like http://www.techlib.com/electronics/games.html

    or commercial kits like
    http://www.circuithut.com/index.php?/circuit/content/view/full/180 (which
    needs a power supply kit also).
     
  9. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Good grief, When did the kid get the assignment?

    And I don't think any of the popular Jeopardy button circuits are
    beyond a 6th grader, if the 6th grader bothers to read a book or
    two.

    You need to learn to get an earlier start on your homework.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  10. Guest

    I believe there are other newsgroups for people who look to just
    spreading noise.
     
  11. On 14 May 2007 14:26:44 -0700, in sci.electronics.design
    I think you are unjust about our Mad Rich.

    I took 10 mins to work out a simple system, but it would not be bug
    free, there can often be "backdoor" or unintended circuit paths, which
    are somewhat undesirable, and to create on a block of wood, by
    tomorrow, som3what difficult

    It can be done with simple relays (costly) and a few transistors, and
    many many diodes, which would be suitable for a kid, but boring.

    Mucking around with a few logic gates would be much more satisfying,
    educational as well

    A bit more notice would have been nice




    martin
     
  12. J.A. Legris

    J.A. Legris Guest

    Here's a nice simple design that can be extended if necessary. If you
    also want buzzers, place them instead of (or in parallel with) the
    lamps.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/498510014/
     
  13. Guest

    Mad Rich? May be appropriate.

    I only have 2 days with my son to do this; I am not with him after
    that...not that it should matter to anyone in this group!?

    Thanks for the replies that help/guide.

    Richard
     
  14. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Well, in all fairness, it's not our responsibility to make sure that
    he gets his assignment done on time. And when the request for help
    was posted with so little time left, well...

    So far, Joe Legris's suggestion to use the circuit at:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/498510014/

    is the best one. The wiring is simple and you can probably get the
    relays at your "local source". Print out the schematic and take it
    over there and they can probably help you select the components you
    need that you haven't already bought.

    Good luck.
     
  15. Guest

    What does why there are only 2 days have to do with anything? It's
    just a deadline. Are you incapable of providing a solution, with a
    time constraint, without trying to criticize the deadline?

    On the solution side, thanks for the recommendations.

    Richard
     
  16. MooseFET

    MooseFET Guest

    The circuit with 3 relays is likely to be the quickest to build, if
    you can get the relays.

    BTW: The "clear" button needs to open the connection when pressed not
    close it. A single pole, single throw switch will work for it since
    nobody needs to do it quickly.
     
  17. Haude Daniel

    Haude Daniel Guest

    Who do you think we are? A help desk? This is a discussion forum, so
    whatever you bring here will get discussed. If you want "no questions
    asked", go find a local professional who will build this thing for
    you and pay him accordingly.

    Two days of deadline is ridiculously short for someone without any
    background in electronics. Any of us here could lash up that relay
    circuit within an hour, but there's always a chance of having made
    a mistake, and without any experience you're going to find it hard
    to troubleshoot it. And then you probably want it to look nice, too...

    Good luck.

    --Daniel
     
  18. Guest

    Thanks to all those who provided helpful responses! We went with the
    3-player Jeopardy game, that was graciously provided here, and just
    finished it this am. We're just painting the board.

    Thanks again for all the help!

    Richard
     
  19. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest


    John just did.

    How long did you procrastinate before getting started on the assignment?

    Have you tried http://www.google.com/search?jeopardy+buttons+circuit ?

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  20. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    Something even more specific was offered
    with the response **That's too hard**:
    http://groups.google.com/group/sci....q=*-groups.google.com/groups/search-*-*-*-*-*

    In retrospect, I think a better life lesson for the procrastinator
    (trying to do something beyond his skill level--even when copying
    verbatim)
    would have been to have given no assistance
    and allow the kid to get a failing grade.
     
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