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Is there a name for this type of motor ?

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by Externet, Mar 15, 2018.

  1. Externet

    Externet

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    Aug 24, 2009
    A kitchen mixer in the sixties had a variable mechanical speed control that changed the angle of the stator brushes by sliding a lever.
    Tried to fix it as a kid when failed but did not understand how it worked. And still not. So, decided to ask now, just for curiosity.
    Found a picture, here it goes :

    [​IMG]
    Sliding the chrome knob down in its slit, showed 'beat' 'whip' 'slow' ... labels behind a window. No triacs inside.
     
  2. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Most likely a Universal motor, it will run on AC or DC, some had a electromechanical switch mechanism that would open and close to regulate the rpm.
    Another similar AC motor is a variable reluctance motor, which it is possible for it to be.
    Modern ones have a Triac type controller.
    I think you mean armature brushes?
    M.
     
  3. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
  4. Minder

    Minder

    2,876
    596
    Apr 24, 2015
    The kitchen aid is the reference I made to the electro mechanical type, but the OP mentions changing angle of brushes?
    M.
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Is it anything like this antique Hamilton Beach?
    http://www.maltmixerman.com/how-to-s-diagrams
    M.
     
  6. Externet

    Externet

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Thanks.
    I believe am saying it right, stator brushes. Of course they contact the rotor.

    But not very static/fixed either. The brushes assembly mounted on a movable plate able to be rotated by the speed lever. Continuously variable; no steps, no winding taps. Zero electronics inside, no potentiometers, rheostats... At the top end of the lever linear travel, a cam opens points to turn off.

    Yes, should be an universal motor, but the position of the brushes was adjustable in angle to vary the speed. The image in post 1 is for an identical mixer (Hamilton Beach)

    upload_2018-3-15_17-48-9.png
    See the brushes at "12:00 and 6:00" ? The brushes were mounted on a plate capable of rotating 90 degrees, to the point of imagine them turned up to "3:00 and 9:00" The speed control lever mechanically and directly attached to the brushes mount plate.

    The speed indicator window is shown at
    ----> https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Vintage-Ham...257097?hash=item3ae0c73e09:g:eZEAAOSw53NY91PB

    Found referenced as being since the 1930's !
    This similar model has no window; instead, labels on the body, perhaps with detents:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2018
  7. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    Older windscreen wiper two speed motors have brushes at different angles, A universal or DC motor runs at slow speed when the stator is at high voltage and will run at higher speed when the field is weakened. The field is presumably taken from the brushes which will have different voltages at different angles.
     
  8. Externet

    Externet

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Thanks. Does that type of controllable universal motor have a 'name' or description ?

    Here is one running ---->

    An a guy butchering one between time stamp 7:00 and 9:00
    ---->
     
  9. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Post #2 should have read Repulsion-Induction motor, not Reluctance. :(
    M.
     
  10. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015

    Eyyyyyyyy Hombre . . . . . . ¿ Que Paaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasa ?



    Considering that yo MaMa's Hamilton Meach Bixer . . .ooops Lys-dexia kickin' 'n again . . . . Beach Mixer was the G series, and I see NO reason from deviation from a PROVEN workhouse model for decades . . . .until they started toying with solid state innovations and their incorporations .

    Ignoring of the smoke and mirrors, variable phase angle shift with a rotating brush holder, instead, fully expect to find that the speed shift tab ties into a rotary bakelite disc that moves its pressure contact to meet with the two contact tabs shown on the top photo.Then, there is the direct connection for full speed operation.
    A common series AC/DC motor is run at full voltage for high speed or thru two series asbestos insulated nichrome wire resistors for the two slower speeds, as are engaged by the two contacts shown.

    The given reference to the HAMILTON BEACH SODA MIXER model finds it using an inductor with two taps instead of the RESISTORS used in yours. The line AC passing thru the inductor's reactance at 60~ equates to series inductive reactance to drop the voltage just as your resistors did.

    I still have and can use the hand version of this HB unit (Turqoise color) and it is made the same. I tore it down once for brush replacement . . . they had worn down so far that it stuttered on running speed.
    Those units 24 segment rotors are certainly due a cleaning and repolishing to show all pristine fresh rosy copper surfacing again.

    And if the end cap solder blob of the paper capacitor / to / foil surfacing by compression / touch proximity has loosened, and is open circuit now, a new generation of like value cap really is in order.
    It supresses the back EMF sparking at each rotor segments end contact transition by absorption and the resultant decrease of metal erosion by sparking.

    ILLUSTRATIONS . . . . . . . . . . .
    • Speed contacts
    • One nichrome wire resistor element
    • Mate . . . . nichrome wire resistor element
    Thaaaaaasit . . . . .. . .

    .
    [​IMG]

    73's de Edd
    .....
     
    Externet likes this.
  11. Externet

    Externet

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Another elaborated response from Edd... thank you, muchacho, for your permanent dedication.

    From what I remember... It was only about 50 years ago... :rolleyes: the yellow arrows point to a sliding contact that supply the connection for the movable brushes assembly.
    Its solid design with no solid state components has been abandoned by this century by cheap, finite-lived disposable, unserviceable designs -pissed off-:(

    Perhaps the nichrome resistor which I did not notice then, keys understanding to its workings. Whenever I can relate that to infinitely variable speed control.

    If you see a tutorial for that speed controlling method somewhere, please link.

    73 !

    ----> Did you ever receive a direct message titled "Your contacts" ?
     
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