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GE Halogen 120v 100bt/sw/cd--Safe?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by W. Watson, Jan 6, 2006.

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  1. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    I just bought a long liFe 100W GE halogen bulb. It has a base like a
    conventional bulb for household use. I plan to use it in an overhead fixture
    that has a fairly large globe and one socket. My wife (typically in these
    situations) complains that it is not safe. Apparently, she bought something
    like it years ago, and has some memory that it burned very hot. I have my
    doubts. I'll call GE tomorrow, but I thought I'd get an opinion here. My gut
    feeling is that in the intervening years that they are now safer than say
    5-10 years ago.

    It's a white frosted bult about 4-5" round, 2" in dia., and looks sort of
    like a pudgy doll.

    Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
    (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
    Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet
     
  2. Lacy

    Lacy Guest

    I can't comment on the bulbs since I have zero experience concerning them.

    I do have a question:

    Isn't that going to be uncomfortably bright? Halogens are usually way
    brighter than normal incadescents. ( I am using as a reference the Halogens
    used in car headlight as a basis for my assumption. Correct me if I am
    wrong).

    Let us know what GE says about this 'cause I am curious now.
     
  3. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    Interestingly, in the case of an e-mail I sent them, they actually got into
    a little physics. Temperature, heat, BTUs, and their measurement. They
    concluded that ultimately the safety depended upon the fixture. I would need
    to contact them. They pointed me to www.iesna.org, but would welcome any
    further questions. While waiting for an e-mail response, I contacted them
    by phone in Ohio. The technician was only able to quote some written
    material she had, which to my way of thinking did not show any unusual
    safety concern. I would have hoped that she might have said something like
    these are the new halogen fixtures which are designed to work in the place
    of common incadescents. She didn't though, nor did the e-mail.

    I put the light in after the phone conversation and it's been happily
    providing light to the den quite regularly since then. I felt the globe and
    it shows no abonormal amount of heat build up or high temperatures. The
    globe is about the size of 1/2 a human head and has one socket. I think the
    enclosure provides enough space not to be worried about safety--in my instance.

    I'll cruise around and see what else I might find out about these new (in my
    view) halogens used for normal home light sockets.
     
  4. Pooh Bear

    Pooh Bear Guest

    It's wise to use ceramic bases for halogen bulbs.

    Graham
     
  5. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    If it's in an overhead fixture, I wouldn't go past the rated wattage of
    the fixture, but other than that, there should be no problem. Halogens
    burn hot, yes, but a globe that big - it sounds like a little halogen
    bulb inside a big frosted globe; do you know anything about their
    construction?

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  6. Screw-in halogen bulbs produce only slightly more light than "standard"
    incandescents (750-1,000 hours life expectancy).

    They also reach similar temperatures. One difference is that they could
    cool more slowly due to thicker glass outer bulb - example Sylvania's
    "Capsylite" which I am more familiar with.

    These things are interchangeable with regular lightbulbs of same
    wattage, except they may have malfunction of the halogen cycle if dimmed
    more than slightly and have only minor life extension from dimming even
    when the halogen cycle works.

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  7. Sure sounds like something like Philips "Halogena" and Sylvania
    "Capsylite". Those have a halogen "capsule" surrounded by an outer bulb.

    Heat output should be about the same as non-halogen incandescent of the
    same wattage.

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
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