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comparing picture tube presentation

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Charlie Bress, May 24, 2004.

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  1. I haven't bought a TV in about 6 years. Now while passing the television
    displays in a local chain store, my DW set her eye on a set with the new
    wider screen. This is in what I seem to recall is a 9x16 aspect ratio as
    compared to the old 3x4.
    All the sets were running a demo that was probably coming from a DVD. There
    is no cable or broadcast programming available.

    This set (if my arm is sufficiently twisted) has to fit into a 32" space in
    an entertainment center. For a set with side mounted, front firing speakers
    this limits the pic tube to a 27" diagonal. And BTW, we are only looking at
    analog sets. I can't find enough programming of interest that would justify
    going digital.

    If Euclid and his geometry have not failed me, then it seems that to get the
    9x16 ratio in a 27" tube, then the height of the picture is smaller than a
    27" tube in the 3x4.

    If a program is broadcast in the old format, is it not true that the display
    on the 9x16 tube is, in fact, smaller than the display on the old 3x4 tube?
    My attempt at a rough approximation is that a 27" 3x4 tube will have a
    picture that is 16"x22" while the 27" 9x16 version will show a picture that
    is around 13"x18".

    Is there a decent tutorial on line that explains the choices and options in
    the new sets? I really don't want to be at the mercy of a salesman for
    explanations.

    Charlie
     
  2. Art

    Art Guest

    May want to do a "yahoo or google" search for HDTV Specifications. Or one of
    the tech forums available which discuss these particular items to infinitum.
    Sometimes the actual manufacturers web sites will post at least the specs
    for their particular products so you can at least attempt to compare
    features, etc.
     
  3. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    The way things are going, the TV standard will be 16:9. In Europe, and many
    other parts of the world 4:3 is no longer the standard. The new 4:3 sets
    will reproduce a 16:9 picture by bringing down the vertical scan to fit. The
    picture is infact smaller, because the size is measured by the diagonal from
    one end to the other (lower left to upper right for example). Therefore the
    total height of the display is not as large on a 16:9 as a 4:3. Also, I
    would consider at least an HDTV ready type of set, if I were to make any
    investment in a TV set. An HDTV set with a digital tuner would be an added
    plus considering the way things are going.

    I myself have been looking at HDTV sets, and I am considering either a
    Plasma or an LCD panel type. I have not reached any conclusion yet, since I
    am not desperate for a set at this time. I am not impressed with any of the
    rear screen or projection sets that I have seen sofar.

    As for anyone considering a rear screen set, I would stay away from the tube
    type technology. HDTV CRT type sets are a good consideration if a very large
    screen is not desired. In a rear screen set, the DLP or the LCD type
    projection set would be a consideration if a large screen was desired. As I
    said, I personally am not impressed with any of the rear screen sets that I
    have seen sofar.

    --

    Jerry G.
    =====


    I haven't bought a TV in about 6 years. Now while passing the television
    displays in a local chain store, my DW set her eye on a set with the new
    wider screen. This is in what I seem to recall is a 9x16 aspect ratio as
    compared to the old 3x4.
    All the sets were running a demo that was probably coming from a DVD. There
    is no cable or broadcast programming available.

    This set (if my arm is sufficiently twisted) has to fit into a 32" space in
    an entertainment center. For a set with side mounted, front firing speakers
    this limits the pic tube to a 27" diagonal. And BTW, we are only looking at
    analog sets. I can't find enough programming of interest that would justify
    going digital.

    If Euclid and his geometry have not failed me, then it seems that to get the
    9x16 ratio in a 27" tube, then the height of the picture is smaller than a
    27" tube in the 3x4.

    If a program is broadcast in the old format, is it not true that the display
    on the 9x16 tube is, in fact, smaller than the display on the old 3x4 tube?
    My attempt at a rough approximation is that a 27" 3x4 tube will have a
    picture that is 16"x22" while the 27" 9x16 version will show a picture that
    is around 13"x18".

    Is there a decent tutorial on line that explains the choices and options in
    the new sets? I really don't want to be at the mercy of a salesman for
    explanations.

    Charlie
     
  4. Jason D.

    Jason D. Guest

    As for anyone considering a rear screen set, I would stay away from the tube
    That's odd, Jerry, care to lay out the details that CRT based rear
    screen failed to meet your expections?

    I find decent 16:9 CRT direct view with working active compension &
    dynamic focus pretty good especially in the corners but bastardly
    HEAVY especially if CRT is flat. This takes bit of digging to find
    this features. Too many DV 16:9 CRT sets didn't have circuits so you
    may notice size variations, fuzzy and preannouced misconvergences at
    corners.

    So far the well adjusted 16:9 HDTV rear screen projectors do well like
    RCA D52Wxxx series (to the extremes; IE: adjusting in service mode for
    every spot looks outstanding in HDTV mode. I done several.

    DLP is good one to go (life) and quality but it's not so sharp
    compared to true CRT based rear screen 16:9 sets plus problem is the
    lamp almost costs 1/4 to 1/3 of a 3 year old set value. Same problem
    with LCD as well but LCD panel(s) doesn't do well on life surviving
    and instense light does produce heat shining through LCD.

    Plamsa is almost unrepairable and cost is so high.

    For any reason to get 16:9 set buying extra warranty (3 to 5 years) is
    a MUST.

    Cheers,

    Wizard
     
  5. Art

    Art Guest

    Having serviced all these formats I personally like the DLP or LCD because
    only of the weight. Picture quality is acceptable, repair cost equable with
    CRT units when you consider the cost of the LAMP and BALLAST. Both becoming
    common failures in these items. Also, much of the "Light Box Assembly" is
    available only as a complete physical item available only from the
    manufacturer, at obvious cost. Yes, many of these are still under original
    manufacturer's warranty but if you have one you bought, without the extended
    service contract, beware, start adding to that piggy bank now. IMHO the crt
    technology indeed is dated, but highly refined by almost all the
    manufacturers. Sorry to say, some have "cheapened" their design to the
    chagrin of both the servicing community and the consumer councils. To the
    consumer I'd say go out and compare, but do a bit of 'learnin' before doing
    the 'chaching' with your $$$$!! Cheers
     
  6. http://www.nab.org/newsroom/issues/digitaltv/dtvstations.asp

    This is the current list of DTV staions currently operating in the US.
    These are the free over the air stations. There are probably more than
    you think in your area. Here in LA, KCET (PBS) runs continuous HD
    programming that sometimes is the same as the analog feed (which is
    always on the DTV signal). KABC reruns newscasts on their DTV in
    addition to the HD network and local feeds. KOCE runs 3 std def
    programs on their DTV channel. KLCS runs 4 std def sometimes (always
    at least 1). CBS is mostly HD (the fake news shows like 48 hrs are not
    HD), NBC is close behind and ABC has a good amount of HD. Then you can
    get digital cable or satellite if there isn't enough. I agree the
    programming leaves much to be desired, but then, when DIDN'T it? So
    far I'm pretty happy with it.
    GG
     
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