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Capacitor Glue

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Tesla, Jun 6, 2010.

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  1. Tesla

    Tesla

    165
    2
    May 10, 2010
    I had the break lose some radial hole-through electrolytic caps. to read their values and/or to replace. They were bent over and glued to the board horizontaly.

    It was pretty tough but slightly rubbery. I'm thinking it was a tinted epoxy.

    Do I need to mix up some epoxy, or do you guys just use standard household 100% silicone? ... or maybe something else?
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,812
    1,945
    Sep 5, 2009
    Hey Tesla,

    if the area that the capacitor is in is relatively warm I will use silicon sealer but thats rare
    most of the time I use hot melt glue :) one of those wonderful fix everything materials ;)

    cheers
    Dave
     
  3. KMoffett

    KMoffett

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    75
    Jan 21, 2009
    Be aware that not all silicone sealants are compatible with electronics. If I remember correctly, the ones with a strong acetic acid smell are a no-no, because it will cause corrosion.

    ken
     
  4. Tesla

    Tesla

    165
    2
    May 10, 2010
    Ya, I tried hot glue before I posted. As soon as the caps (or the board in general) warms up the least little bit, the hot glue releases.
     
  5. Tesla

    Tesla

    165
    2
    May 10, 2010
    Any silicone sealant that is 100% silicone (bathroom or red RTV sealant for gaskets) that I have ... has the strong smell. These are the ones that clean-up with alcohol.

    I also have some door/window sealant, but if you read closely you see it's only "siliconized" acrylic caulking. It doesn't smell as bad, and cleans-up with water. Is this the one you think would be better?

    Yes, I didn't want to "glue" them back down with the wrong adhesive and cause another problem ... quite counter-productive.
     
  6. KMoffett

    KMoffett

    723
    75
    Jan 21, 2009
    I don't know. In the past I've always used silicon RTV made to be compatible with electronics. The acrylic might work OK. You might email the manufacturer and ask them.

    Ken
     
  7. NickS

    NickS

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    Apr 6, 2010
    We use RTV and it works great.
     
  8. KMoffett

    KMoffett

    723
    75
    Jan 21, 2009
    There are many different formulations of "RTV". Some are compatible with electronics (non-corrosive), some are not. What manufacturer/product are you using.

    ken
     
  9. Tesla

    Tesla

    165
    2
    May 10, 2010
    Yes, some links would be great. I don't mind buying the right product.

    Reminds me of using "the right tool for the right job".
     
  10. NickS

    NickS

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    0
    Apr 6, 2010
    Sorry to have been vague.

    The exact stuff we use is made by DOW CORNING
    it is 3145 RTV (MIL-A-46146)

    See clip of specs.
     

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  11. Tesla

    Tesla

    165
    2
    May 10, 2010
    Thanks Nick. And thanks KMoffett for bring it to my attention that not all silicone is safe for use on electronics.

    Here is the DC 3145
    http://www.ellsworth.com/display/productdetail.html?productid=229

    I have used other GC Electronics chemicals before with good results
    http://www.altex.com/GC-Electronic-Grade-Silicone-Sealant-Adhesive-3oz-19-155-P141838.aspx

    An example of what NOT to use. At first it appears to be suitable, but notice it specifically says NOT to use on electronics.
    http://www.altex.com/MG-Chemicals-RTV-Silicone-Clear-28-oz-RTV-108-P143191.aspx
     
  12. NickS

    NickS

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    0
    Apr 6, 2010
    I loved reading the description for the third one.
    Can anyone think of an adhesive application in which corrosion of sensitive metals is desirable?
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,812
    1,945
    Sep 5, 2009

    hahhaaha ummmmm only if I was wanting to etch said metal ;)

    cheers
    Dave

    PS...
    I realised later, I should have qualified my earlier statement about the use of appropriate silicon sealers .... spur of the moment writing of a reply I neglected to do so :(
     
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