Why don't they make this: CFL insertion socket?

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by TimR, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. TimR

    TimR Guest

    Trying to get a CFL to work in a pole lamp triggered an unrelated idea.

    (the lamp is European; apparently there is a difference between E26 and E27fixtures that is just enough to make some brands of CFL work and others not. Wish I could figure out the right brand)

    Anyway, there is no other way to screw in a CFL than by holding the tube itself. I just don't like doing that. It leaves finger dirt and oil on the glass, and while I've never broken one off this way it seems possible, especially unscrewing one that's been in the socket a while.

    But, these are spiral shaped. It would be dead easy to have a screwdriver slot in the base that you could reach through the inside of the spiral tube.. That would make insertion easier, and solve the problem of getting a broken one out of a socket.
     
    TimR, Oct 29, 2012
    #1
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  2. TimR

    Tomsic Guest

    Trying to get a CFL to work in a pole lamp triggered an unrelated idea.

    (the lamp is European; apparently there is a difference between E26 and E27
    fixtures that is just enough to make some brands of CFL work and others not.
    Wish I could figure out the right brand)

    Anyway, there is no other way to screw in a CFL than by holding the tube
    itself. I just don't like doing that. It leaves finger dirt and oil on the
    glass, and while I've never broken one off this way it seems possible,
    especially unscrewing one that's been in the socket a while.

    But, these are spiral shaped. It would be dead easy to have a screwdriver
    slot in the base that you could reach through the inside of the spiral tube.
    That would make insertion easier, and solve the problem of getting a broken
    one out of a socket.



    Nice idea. Why don't you submit it to one or more of the major lamp
    companies. They all have a "submitted ideas" desk for such things. They'll
    warn you about patents, non-disclosures, etc. but some ideas do get
    implemented. Also, you likely won't get any recognition or money; but you
    might get some free lamps.

    E26 and E27 bases are indeed very close in dimensions, but size tolerences
    get to working and so certain lamps and bases are hard to get in or out. If
    I have a tight base, a little silicone spray helps and it's best that you
    use it before inserting the lamp.

    Tomsic
     
    Tomsic, Oct 29, 2012
    #2
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  3. TimR

    Guest

    I have read, maybe in this newsgroup, that it sometimes works backwards
    to what you would expect. I think this is the post I am remembering:

    https://groups.google.com/group/sci...b761fc0?dmode=source&output=gplain&noredirect
    Or, find a local hardware store that also repairs portable fixtures.
    The ones that do enough of it are used to putting US sockets in European
    fixtures, including having (or making!) the right mechanical pieces to
    get the US socket attached to the fixture.
    In some fixtures you can hold on to the plastic base of the CFL, but
    for a lot of them, holding the glass is indeed easiest.
    Wear gloves or use a cloth?
    FWIW, I've never had the glass of a CFL break while installing or
    removing it. All of the glass failures have been due to some external
    trauma: either it was an exposed ceiling fixture and somebody smacked
    the glass with something, or it was a portable fixture that fell over
    and damaged the glass.
    A lot of the CFLs I've used (60 W to 100 W equivalent) seem to have air
    vent holes (for the ballast) in the place where a slot like this would
    need to go. They could probably be moved away from the center and still
    work.

    A possibly more interesting question is: what happens if somebody is
    really enthusiastic with the screwdriver and pokes it through the
    plastic? I think they are at least likely to damage the ballast, and
    if they are really going for it, might manage to get the screwdriver in
    contact with the center terminal of the socket, which is probably
    sub-optimal.

    Matt Roberds
     
    , Oct 30, 2012
    #3
  4. TimR

    TimR Guest

    Yeah, but.

    The quality of the sockets in these two pole lamps is an order of magnitudebetter than that of US lamps.

    I do wonder about one thing. European voltages are twice the US, so the current is only half. That suggests the wire size is pretty small, one of the reasons I only use CFLs in them. There might be a safety issue here.
     
    TimR, Oct 30, 2012
    #4
  5. TimR

    Guest

    Better-quality US sockets are probably obtainable.
    The line cord is probably OK. It has to be thick enough (both copper
    and insulation) to handle normal household use, which is about the same
    in both places. I have seen European lamp cord labeled as 0.75 mm^2,
    which is between 18 and 19 AWG, and another popular "small" wire size
    there seems to be 0.8 mm^2, which is just under 18 AWG.

    If there are any short wires inside the fixture (like between a switch
    and a socket), they might be made out of something thinner, especially
    if they are protected by the body of the fixture.

    If you have the adapter that turns a lamp socket into two 2-prong
    receptacles and a lamp socket, screw that into the fixture socket, and
    then screw a 100 W incandescent into the adapter. You can then
    (carefully) measure the voltage drop between the wall receptacle and the
    receptacle on the adapter with a multimeter. (Tape all but the last
    1/8" or 3 mm of the multimeter probes with electrical tape if they
    aren't already like that.)

    Matt Roberds
     
    , Nov 8, 2012
    #5
  6. TimR

    TimR Guest

    On Wednesday, November 7, 2012 9:05:26 PM UTC-5, wrote:
    If you have the adapter that turns a lamp socket into two 2-prong receptacles and a lamp socket, screw that into the fixture socket, and then screw a 100 W incandescent into the adapter. You can then (carefully) measure the voltage drop between the wall receptacle and the receptacle on the adapter with a multimeter. (Tape all but the last 1/8" or 3 mm of the multimeter probes with electrical tape if they aren't already like that.) Matt Roberds

    That's.............genius! I never thought of that, great testing idea.
     
    TimR, Dec 7, 2012
    #6
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