Soldering Tiny Wires Query

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by edvogel56@gmail.com, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. Guest

    Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this.

    I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.


    Questions:

    1. Anyone else tried this or similar?
    2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering.

    Thanks in advance.

    EdV
     
    , Jan 9, 2014
    #1
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  2. Guest

    On Thursday, January 9, 2014 8:55:05 AM UTC-5, wrote:
    > Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire intight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this. I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire. Questions: 1. Anyone else tried this or similar? 2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering. Thanks in advance. EdV


    I would think this would damage the plating of the tip and once it corrodesit will no longer "wett" well at that spot.

    Mark
     
    , Jan 9, 2014
    #2
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  3. Don Y Guest

    Hi Ed,

    On 1/9/2014 6:55 AM, wrote:
    > Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG
    > wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried
    > this.


    <frown> I only use kynar and teflon in that wire gauge and they
    wouldn't fare well with heat!

    > I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point
    > end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids
    > in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.
    >
    > Questions:
    >
    > 1. Anyone else tried this or similar? 2. Anyone know of commercially
    > available "V tips" for soldering.


    I've seen tips that look like a "forked tongue" (not sure if this is
    where you imagined making the notch vs. along the "length" of the
    tip)
     
    Don Y, Jan 9, 2014
    #3
  4. Nico Coesel Guest

    wrote:

    >Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this.
    >
    >I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.


    Better use a good iron with a relatively big tip at the proper
    temperature (330 deg C). The secret to soldering is to use a bigger
    tip than seemingly possible. Small tips lack the thermal mass and
    conductivity to heat up a joint fast enough so the flux burns up
    without doing anything.

    Every now and then I solder wires as thin as a hair. The thinner the
    better because surface tension pulls the wire right into the soldering
    joint. Things can't get easier.

    --
    Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
    indicates you are not using the right tools...
    nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
    --------------------------------------------------------------
     
    Nico Coesel, Jan 9, 2014
    #4
  5. Guest

    On Thursday, January 9, 2014 10:06:45 AM UTC-6, John Larkin wrote:
    > On Thu, 9 Jan 2014 05:55:05 -0800 (PST), wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >Questions:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >1. Anyone else tried this or similar?

    >
    > >2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >Thanks in advance.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >EdV

    >
    >
    >
    > I did this with a Dremel:
    >
    >
    >
    > https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Fork_Tip.JPG
    >
    >
    >
    > It's for desoldering surface-mount resistors and caps.
    >
    >
    >
    > My low-end Metcal doesn't have fork tips available.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    >
    > John Larkin Highland Technology Inc
    >
    > www.highlandtechnology.com jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com
    >
    >
    >
    > Precision electronic instrumentation
    >
    > Picosecond-resolution Digital Delay and Pulse generators
    >
    > Custom timing and laser controllers
    >
    > Photonics and fiberoptic TTL data links
    >
    > VME analog, thermocouple, LVDT, synchro, tachometer
    >
    > Multichannel arbitrary waveform generators


    Nice! Mine worked but the metal is more bent out of the way than actually removed.
     
    , Jan 9, 2014
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Thursday, January 9, 2014 10:53:44 AM UTC-6, Nico Coesel wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.

    >
    >
    >
    > Better use a good iron with a relatively big tip at the proper
    >
    > temperature (330 deg C). The secret to soldering is to use a bigger
    >
    > tip than seemingly possible. Small tips lack the thermal mass and
    >
    > conductivity to heat up a joint fast enough so the flux burns up
    >
    > without doing anything.
    >
    >
    >
    > Every now and then I solder wires as thin as a hair. The thinner the
    >
    > better because surface tension pulls the wire right into the soldering
    >
    > joint. Things can't get easier.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
    >
    > indicates you are not using the right tools...
    >
    > nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------


    It's the space constraints of the already crowded PWB in this instance that led to the modified tip. I often solder a 40 AWG wire strand then add insulation and strain relieve it and solder to another strain relieved wire bit there wasn't room this time.
     
    , Jan 9, 2014
    #6
  7. Den torsdag den 9. januar 2014 21.00.08 UTC+1 skrev Jon Elson:
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in

    >
    > > tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end

    >
    > > and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in

    >
    > > making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Questions:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > 1. Anyone else tried this or similar?

    >
    > > 2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering.

    >
    > I make lots of patches and prototype test boards with wire wrap wire, and
    >
    > solder them with standard soldering tips with no trouble.
    >
    >
    >
    > Jon


    I use enamel wire, no messing around getting the insulation off,
    just dip the cut end in a blob of solder on a hot iron

    -Lasse
     
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen, Jan 9, 2014
    #7
  8. On Thu, 09 Jan 2014 08:06:45 -0800, John Larkin
    <> wrote:

    >
    >I did this with a Dremel:
    >
    >https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Gear/Fork_Tip.JPG
    >
    >It's for desoldering surface-mount resistors and caps.
    >
    >My low-end Metcal doesn't have fork tips available.
    >


    Do you have a tweezer type? Really fast and little possibility of
    damaging the board.

    The German Weller type is nice, but I've also noticed some knock-off
    designs for a fraction of the price.

    --sp
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Jan 9, 2014
    #8
  9. On Thu, 9 Jan 2014 05:55:05 -0800 (PST), Gave us:


    >Questions:
    >
    >1. Anyone else tried this or similar?
    >2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >EdV


    Usenet Line length is 72 characters.

    Your contact does NOT need to be that intimate. That is why you do
    NOT see it anywhere else in the industry.

    I'll bet you plowed up a lot of pads and tracks in the thru-hole days.

    At 30Ga., all you need is a tiny drop of solder on the end of the tip.
    The flux is already at the solder joint location (or should be). A mere
    touch of the tip to the entire connection node, and a reflow occurs, no
    need to dig, plow, or gain weldement level conduction of the elements
    involved.

    The old Heathkit training is no longer valid.

    Sheesh. Oh, and 30Ga wire is for point to point, and SURFACE attach.
    Putting on into a through hole or via is asking for it to get broken.
    For that, you want strands.
     
    DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno, Jan 10, 2014
    #9
  10. Chris Jones Guest

    On 10/01/2014 01:52, wrote:
    > On Thursday, January 9, 2014 8:55:05 AM UTC-5, wrote:
    >> Yesterday I discovered a technique for soldering wire wrap 30 AWG wire in tight spots and was wondering if anyone else may have tried this. I took the finest tip I had which is about a 0.5 mm dia on the point end and used an Xacto knife to score a V slot. This little slot aids in making solid mechanical and thermal contact with the 30 AWG wire. Questions: 1. Anyone else tried this or similar? 2. Anyone know of commercially available "V tips" for soldering. Thanks in advance. EdV

    >
    > I would think this would damage the plating of the tip and once it corrodes it will no longer "wett" well at that spot.
    >
    > Mark
    >


    Yes, without the protective iron-plating, the copper core of the tip
    will dissolve in the solder, and won't last long.

    A small drop of fresh solder and perhaps a slightly bigger tip will fill
    any gaps and ensure excellent thermal contact and this avoids the need
    for desperate measures.

    Chris
     
    Chris Jones, Jan 10, 2014
    #10
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