Mains wiring question: flush vs. surface load panel

Discussion in 'Electronic Equipment' started by Bob E., May 13, 2013.

  1. Bob E.

    Bob E. Guest

    Installing a charging station in a garage for the new car owner. The charger
    is surface-mount.

    The easiest install will be surface mount using liquid-tight flex on top of
    the sheetrock.

    Problem is that the load panel (nearby, on the same wall) is flush-mount with
    knockouts (obviously) beneath the 'rock.

    I'm considering running the flex on the surface and doing a "submarine"
    trench / slit in the 'rock such that the flex will mate straight to the side
    of the panel.

    Any other ideas other than this?

    (In USA.)

    Thanks.
     
    Bob E., May 13, 2013
    #1
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  2. Bob E.

    Jamie Guest

    Bob E. wrote:
    > Installing a charging station in a garage for the new car owner. The charger
    > is surface-mount.
    >
    > The easiest install will be surface mount using liquid-tight flex on top of
    > the sheetrock.
    >
    > Problem is that the load panel (nearby, on the same wall) is flush-mount with
    > knockouts (obviously) beneath the 'rock.
    >
    > I'm considering running the flex on the surface and doing a "submarine"
    > trench / slit in the 'rock such that the flex will mate straight to the side
    > of the panel.
    >
    > Any other ideas other than this?
    >
    > (In USA.)
    >
    > Thanks.
    >

    run wire between the studs under the sheet rock from a knock out of the
    subpanel up to the joist and down the wall under the rock where the
    charger will be, even though in some places it is acceptable to bore
    holes no more than a specific side in the studs to pass wire
    horizontally, I would wouldn't recommend it. If you do decide on
    this, use rigid with feed through stud supports that can be mounted.

    THe charger should have knock outs on the back panel inside for the
    power entrance. Most people in this case use a rung of romix. You
    simply surface mount the charger with the entrance poking through inside.

    I always thought a charger was an appliance and should have a
    rubber cord with cap to a surface or recessed receptacle.


    Jamie
     
    Jamie, May 14, 2013
    #2
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  3. Bob E.

    Bob E. Guest

    > run wire between the studs under the sheet rock from a knock out of the
    > subpanel up to the joist and down the wall under the rock where the
    > charger will be, even though in some places it is acceptable to bore
    > holes no more than a specific side in the studs to pass wire
    > horizontally, I would wouldn't recommend it. If you do decide on
    > this, use rigid with feed through stud supports that can be mounted.
    >
    > THe charger should have knock outs on the back panel inside for the
    > power entrance. Most people in this case use a rung of romix. You
    > simply surface mount the charger with the entrance poking through inside.
    >
    > I always thought a charger was an appliance and should have a
    > rubber cord with cap to a surface or recessed receptacle.
    > Jamie


    The 100A circuit needed by the charger (the actual charger is in the vehicle
    -- this is really just a connector to the structure's 240 ac mains) requires
    3 awg copper wire (4 awg ground). Some kind of conduit required, probably
    1.25 inch. Romex not an option.

    Under the 'rock is difficult: water heater & furnace are between the panel
    and the charge station proposed location. Enough clearance over the 'rock but
    going "sub" requires much frustration, if possible.

    What's a "feed through stud support"? (Googling this gets hits relating to
    threaded electrical stud, not a 2x4...)

    Still think that surface mount except for the last 18 inches then going "sub"
    is the best option.

    These cars are 85 KWh capacities. Think "SLA charger times 10."

    Thanks.
     
    Bob E., May 14, 2013
    #3
  4. Bob E.

    Bob E. Guest

    > The only problem I see is esthetics. As long as the customer is OK
    > with this it will work.
    > You could do the "submarining" in a 6" deep J box with a cover to make
    > it look a little more planned. Punch a KO, low in the box for the
    > inside run and near the top for the surface run. Dog leg the #3 in the
    > box.


    Thanks for the great raceway/box suggestion. One more option.
     
    Bob E., May 14, 2013
    #4
  5. Bob E.

    Bob E. Guest

    >> The only problem I see is esthetics. As long as the customer is OK
    >> with this it will work.
    >> You could do the "submarining" in a 6" deep J box with a cover to make
    >> it look a little more planned. Punch a KO, low in the box for the
    >> inside run and near the top for the surface run. Dog leg the #3 in the
    >> box.


    Hmm... just realized:

    The load panel is sandwiched between studs. The raceway/j-box will have to be
    outboard of the stud. I guess that is OK, NEC-wise, if I use a long-ish
    nipple from panel knockout to j-box...
     
    Bob E., May 14, 2013
    #5
  6. Bob E.

    Jamie Guest

    Bob E. wrote:

    >>run wire between the studs under the sheet rock from a knock out of the
    >>subpanel up to the joist and down the wall under the rock where the
    >>charger will be, even though in some places it is acceptable to bore
    >>holes no more than a specific side in the studs to pass wire
    >>horizontally, I would wouldn't recommend it. If you do decide on
    >>this, use rigid with feed through stud supports that can be mounted.
    >>
    >> THe charger should have knock outs on the back panel inside for the
    >>power entrance. Most people in this case use a rung of romix. You
    >>simply surface mount the charger with the entrance poking through inside.
    >>
    >> I always thought a charger was an appliance and should have a
    >>rubber cord with cap to a surface or recessed receptacle.
    >> Jamie

    >
    >
    > The 100A circuit needed by the charger (the actual charger is in the vehicle
    > -- this is really just a connector to the structure's 240 ac mains) requires
    > 3 awg copper wire (4 awg ground). Some kind of conduit required, probably
    > 1.25 inch. Romex not an option.
    >
    > Under the 'rock is difficult: water heater & furnace are between the panel
    > and the charge station proposed location. Enough clearance over the 'rock but
    > going "sub" requires much frustration, if possible.
    >
    > What's a "feed through stud support"? (Googling this gets hits relating to
    > threaded electrical stud, not a 2x4...)
    >
    > Still think that surface mount except for the last 18 inches then going "sub"
    > is the best option.
    >
    > These cars are 85 KWh capacities. Think "SLA charger times 10."
    >
    > Thanks.
    >

    Electrical Stud bushings.

    Jamie
     
    Jamie, May 14, 2013
    #6
  7. Bob E.

    Rich. Guest

    "Bob E." <> wrote in message
    news:-september.org...
    >>> The only problem I see is esthetics. As long as the customer is OK
    >>> with this it will work.
    >>> You could do the "submarining" in a 6" deep J box with a cover to make
    >>> it look a little more planned. Punch a KO, low in the box for the
    >>> inside run and near the top for the surface run. Dog leg the #3 in the
    >>> box.

    >
    > Hmm... just realized:
    >
    > The load panel is sandwiched between studs. The raceway/j-box will have to
    > be
    > outboard of the stud. I guess that is OK, NEC-wise, if I use a long-ish
    > nipple from panel knockout to j-box...


    Do the same thing with the j-box, but go over or under the panel instead of
    to the side of it.
     
    Rich., May 14, 2013
    #7
  8. Bob E.

    bud-- Guest

    On 5/14/2013 2:38 AM, Rich. wrote:
    >
    > "Bob E." <> wrote in message
    > news:-september.org...
    >>>> The only problem I see is esthetics. As long as the customer is OK
    >>>> with this it will work.
    >>>> You could do the "submarining" in a 6" deep J box with a cover to make
    >>>> it look a little more planned. Punch a KO, low in the box for the
    >>>> inside run and near the top for the surface run. Dog leg the #3 in the
    >>>> box.

    >>
    >> Hmm... just realized:
    >>
    >> The load panel is sandwiched between studs. The raceway/j-box will
    >> have to be
    >> outboard of the stud. I guess that is OK, NEC-wise, if I use a long-ish
    >> nipple from panel knockout to j-box...

    >
    > Do the same thing with the j-box, but go over or under the panel instead
    > of to the side of it.


    Could also use a deep j-box and half recess it in the wall. Straight
    nipple to panel and surface run to the charger.
     
    bud--, May 14, 2013
    #8
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