LC56 A 383 8 PIN DIL IC

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by flippineck, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. flippineck

    flippineck

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    Standard 8 pin DIL IC marked thus:

    Code:
             A
    LC56    ___
            383
    
    It's on a small PCB along with a diode, a red LED, 2 electrolytic caps and an inductor. The PCB is marked ZB195-1 161030

    the PCB is attached by 2 flying leads marked V+ and V- to the terminals of a standard car cigarette lighter plug.

    the PCB also has two flying leads one red one black, which exit the board into a black 2 core cable that terminates in a micro usb plug.

    the housing of the unit is moulded as a plug for a car cigarette lighter, and a sticker on the outside indicates input voltage 12-24v DC & output voltage 5V DC current 1A.

    Does anyone happen to know where to find a datasheet for the chip marked LC56, or know of an alternative moniker for it?
     
    flippineck, Nov 24, 2017
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  2. flippineck

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    That's most likely a switch mode voltage regulator (step-down regulator). I can's find a datasheet neither, but I found this reverse engineered schematic. It may help you get along.
     
    Harald Kapp, Nov 26, 2017
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  3. flippineck

    flippineck

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    Thanks Harald, good find.

    I'm trying to neatly power four dashcams in my car, three in the windscreen & one in the rear.

    Out of the box, each (identical) dashcam comes with one of these cigarette lighter plug-in psus. Four psu's all together in a 4-cigarette lighter adapter in the dash take up too much room. I was hoping to rig up a neat four - headed mini-b usb lead with just one usb A plug plugged into a cigarette lighter usb psu up front at the end distant to the cameras, and wanted to checkout the psu characteristics required for four cameras in parrallel.

    I suppose the way to go is to just monitor the max current taken by one cam in operation using a multimeter, and design a multi-headed usb cable to suit that max current x 4?

    One solderable usb A connector, 4 solderable mini-b usb connectors, some nice thin 2 core cable suitable for the current, and some heatshrink..

    I could just buy 4 standard usb leads and a 4-way usb car psu, but unfortunately no cables seem readily available that only have the power lines connected. Once the data lines are also connected, the cameras react differently and think they are attached to a computer, and go into data transfer mode rather than auto recording mode on powerup. The idea is, the cams automatically start recording on an endless loop soon as you turn the key on without the driver having to think about anything. They do that with plain power-only 2 wire power leads, +5V & ground.
     
    flippineck, Nov 28, 2017
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  4. flippineck

    gordon2387

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    I always have on hand a few voltage adjustable 3 amp continuous buck regulator modules from eBay. Just do a search on eBay for "MP2307" - if you sort by lowest price they are 10 for $4 US or less. They are 11x17 mm and are effectively an LM317 replacement but without the power loss as they are switchmode. Input is 5 to 23 v and output is <1v to 20v. Output voltage is always less than input voltage, with some headroom allowance.

    I use these to power 3.3 v devices from 5v, 5v USB devices from 12v, and to run 12v LED strips at 11v from 12-19v sources for longer life. Many many uses!
     
    gordon2387, Apr 14, 2018
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