Efficient Refrigerators - cheap????

Discussion in 'Photovoltaics' started by East-of-lake, Jan 23, 2004.

  1. East-of-lake

    East-of-lake Guest

    Sunfrost's electric or one of the gas/propane units are very efficient but
    all of them are expensive. It's a toss up whether the Sunfrost is cheaper
    than buying a "normal" refrigerator and putting the savings into extra PV
    capacity.

    Don't any of the "mass market" manufacturers make any high efficiency
    refrigerators and freezers? This isn't rocket science; a smaller compressor
    with 1/4 to 1/2 inch thicker insulation would to wonders for power
    consumption. Surely GE, Kenmore, etc could sucessfuly market them.
     
    East-of-lake, Jan 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. East-of-lake

    Lee Smith Guest

    East-of-lake wrote:

    > Sunfrost's electric or one of the gas/propane units are very efficient but
    > all of them are expensive. It's a toss up whether the Sunfrost is cheaper
    > than buying a "normal" refrigerator and putting the savings into extra PV
    > capacity.
    >
    > Don't any of the "mass market" manufacturers make any high efficiency
    > refrigerators and freezers? This isn't rocket science; a smaller
    > compressor with 1/4 to 1/2 inch thicker insulation would to wonders for
    > power
    > consumption. Surely GE, Kenmore, etc could sucessfuly market them.


    If you look at : www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topfridge.htm
    they list a few of the "top performers" including:

    Sunfrost RF-16 with 14.31 cubic feet using 254 kWh/year
    Kenmore 6397*30* with 18.79 cubic feet using 392 kWh/year
    and many others..

    Lee
     
    Lee Smith, Jan 23, 2004
    #2
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  3. East-of-lake

    Ben Simons Guest

    Am Thu, 22 Jan 2004 16:21:53 -0800 hat East-of-lake <>
    geschrieben:

    > Sunfrost's electric or one of the gas/propane units are very efficient
    > but
    > all of them are expensive. It's a toss up whether the Sunfrost is
    > cheaper
    > than buying a "normal" refrigerator and putting the savings into extra PV
    > capacity.
    >
    > Don't any of the "mass market" manufacturers make any high efficiency
    > refrigerators and freezers? This isn't rocket science; a smaller
    > compressor
    > with 1/4 to 1/2 inch thicker insulation would to wonders for power
    > consumption. Surely GE, Kenmore, etc could sucessfuly market them.
    >


    They do, at last european companies. They are at about 10kWh/feet^3/year
    (if i have done the conversions right). This number depends on the ambient
    temperature. Perhaps the european test-procedure is different than
    US-test. Who knows?
    --> See www.topten.ch (german). Klick on "Haushalt/Kühlschränke"

    --
    --Please answer to the group, not the email-address. Thanks
     
    Ben Simons, Jan 23, 2004
    #3
  4. East-of-lake

    Guest

    Lee Smith <> wrote:

    >If you look at : www.aceee.org/consumerguide/topfridge.htm
    >they list a few of the "top performers" including:
    >
    >Sunfrost RF-16 with 14.31 cubic feet using 254 kWh/year


    ....17.7 kWh/ft^3-year, or 7.2 kWh/ft^2-year, as
    a 14.31 ft^3 cube with 35.4 ft^2 of surface...

    >Kenmore 6397*30* with 18.79 cubic feet using 392 kWh/year


    ....20.9 kWh/ft^3-year, or 9.2 kWh/ft^2-year.

    Ben Simons <> wrote:

    >...european companies...are at about 10kWh/feet^3/year (if i have done
    >the conversions right). This number depends on the ambient temperature.
    >Perhaps the european test-procedure is different than US-test. Who knows?


    Maybe you could compare the European and US standards.

    www.topten.ch (german). Klick on "Haushalt/Kühlschränke"

    The most efficient at "16-38C" ambient temp is the Candy CPDC 320AA plus,
    with a 253 L (8.9ft^3) combined fridge/freezer cap and a 203 kWh/year
    consumption, ie 22.7 kWh/ft^3-year, or 7.9 kWh/ft^2-year.

    I like the heat pump clothes dryers and drying closets. The hot air dryers
    also look more efficient, at about 0.3 kWh/kg, with a 5-6 hour drying time.
    The horizontal-axis washers also take longer, use less water and soap and
    energy, and heat their own water. How much of this stuff would run on our
    240 V 60 vs 50 Hz?

    Nick
     
    , Jan 23, 2004
    #4
  5. East-of-lake

    Ben Simons Guest


    > The most efficient at "16-38C" ambient temp is the Candy CPDC 320AA plus,


    If you have 16C or 38C makes a BIG difference I think.

    > with a 253 L (8.9ft^3) combined fridge/freezer cap and a 203 kWh/year
    > consumption, ie 22.7 kWh/ft^3-year, or 7.9 kWh/ft^2-year.
    >
    > I like the heat pump clothes dryers and drying closets. The hot air
    > dryers
    > also look more efficient, at about 0.3 kWh/kg, with a 5-6 hour drying
    > time.
    > The horizontal-axis washers also take longer, use less water and soap and
    > energy, and heat their own water. How much of this stuff would run on our
    > 240 V 60 vs 50 Hz?


    Hmm We have 230/50Hz in CH. Hmm, interesting question.

    More Frequency->Motor is faster-> dryer/machine runs faster (20%).
    Probably too much for a washing machine??
    More Voltage -> Heating is faster too (9%,U^2)

    Since Bosch AEG,Liebherr, Electrolux etc are big companies they probably
    have devices with other tensions/frequencies. Check it out.

    >
    > Nick
    >




    --
    --Please answer to the group, not the email-address. Thanks
     
    Ben Simons, Jan 23, 2004
    #5
  6. East-of-lake

    Chris Torek Guest

    In article <news:burgeg$>
    <> writes:
    [snippage]
    >I like the heat pump clothes dryers and drying closets. The hot air dryers
    >also look more efficient, at about 0.3 kWh/kg, with a 5-6 hour drying time.
    >The horizontal-axis washers also take longer, use less water and soap and
    >energy, and heat their own water. How much of this stuff would run on our
    >240 V 60 vs 50 Hz?


    I bought a Miele washer/dryer set; it works fine on 240V 60Hz but
    "wants" 15 amp instead of 30 amp breakers. Miele include a kit that
    plugs into the 240V 30A dryer socket and presents two European-outlet
    15A circuits, each with its own breaker. The washer, at least, uses
    a variable-speed DC motor with up to 1600 RPM on the spin cycle,
    so the change in frequency is no problem there. (The dryer is also
    electronically controlled, but has a single speed as far as I know,
    so there is no reason it would particularly *need* a DC motor.)

    (First machine I ever used that got the rust stains out of my old
    gym shirt. But the rust chewed up the cotton fibers, so now I have
    a line of small holes instead. :) )
    --
    In-Real-Life: Chris Torek, Wind River Systems
    Salt Lake City, UT, USA (40°39.22'N, 111°50.29'W) +1 801 277 2603
    email: forget about it http://web.torek.net/torek/index.html
    Reading email is like searching for food in the garbage, thanks to spammers.
     
    Chris Torek, Jan 25, 2004
    #6
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