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XLR Connector Gender

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], Mar 8, 2013.

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  1. Guest

    I’m designing my first piece of home brew audio equipment that uses balanced (XLR) input and output connectors. Is there a standard for gender selection for the input and output chassis connectors? I’ve seen equipment that uses male for both inputs and outputs. I’ve also seen equipment thatuses male for outputs and female for inputs. Is there a preferred gender assignment?
     
  2. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    I’m designing my first piece of home brew audio equipment that uses balanced
    (XLR) input and output connectors. Is there a standard for gender selection
    for the input and output chassis connectors? I’ve seen equipment that uses
    male for both inputs and outputs. I’ve also seen equipment that uses male
    for outputs and female for inputs. Is there a preferred gender assignment?

    ** The standard goes like this:

    Microphones have 3 pin male XLRs on the bottom.

    Mic and equipment signal leads have one male and one female - so you can
    chain them.

    Mixers and the like have female inputs and male outputs.

    Speaker boxes use males only.

    Speaker leads use females only.

    BTW:

    Pin 1 on an XLR mates first when you plug in - so it gets used for ground.


    ..... Phil
     
  3. Guest

    The nice thing about standards is that there are *so* many to choose
    from.

    When I was working with those things daily I had a potfull of male and
    female connectors soldered back-to-back because there was no standard.
    Our equipment had both sexes on the back so they could loop through
    and the connector sex didn't matter.

    Now, figure out which pins are which. We supported three standards,
    there, with a potfull of relays. It's a mess.
     
  4. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    ** Many decades ago - right ?


    ** The rules I posted are followed by all professional audio gear that one
    is likely to find still in use.

    Pin 1 is always ground too.


    ..... Phil
     
  5. Guest

    Thanks for the information (and sad stories). I guess I'll stick with maleoutput, female input, since the device is all electronic.

    Jon
     
  6. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "dave the TROLL "

    ** Meaningless - like all your fuckwit posts.

    FOAD idiot.


    .... Phil
     
  7. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    If that was me making the rule on that I would follow the standards...
    +/- etc... Meaning the positive number is first and then the negative..

    Also, you'll find that in terminal lay outs, well most of what I've
    seen and implemented, the + terminal is first, (-) second and if there
    is a ground? That comes after the (-) terminal..

    But that is me and me is me, and there is no other "me" on this
    planet. :)

    Jamie
     
  8. Guest

    Wrong. Modern stuff, still being manufactured.
    Yes, I haven't seen a counterexample but there are three more pins
    that can be anything.
     
  9. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    <
    "Phil Allison"

    ** Not pro audio gear, for sure.

    Post proof if you still disagree.


    ** LOL - math is not you strong suit.

    There are **2 more pins ** that can be a few things, in pro audio.



    .... Phil
     
  10. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Michael A. Terrell"

    ** So fucking what?

    The context here is 3 pin XLRs, the standard for pro audio.

    ** So do I (eg ABC in Australia) and all that gear is specially made.

    So totally irrelevant.

    **** off - psycho **** head.



    .... Phil
     
  11. MrTallyman

    MrTallyman Guest


    Unbelievable.

    If it has more than three pins, you cannot call it "XLR".

    It isn't about "Pro Audio", "pro audio" OR "some radio and TV
    stations". XLR is a SPECIFICATION, so if you want to call it that, it
    WILL be THREE pins for balanced audio feeds

    Sorry, Terrell, old boy, but Phil is correct 100%

    Sure, there are other beasts which utilized the same shells, but they
    are also referred to differently, especially by those familiar with the
    real one. Such a person would say "A 4 pin XLR" or "An XLR4" or such,
    all they way up to 7 pins. No need to ever have said "XLR3". It was
    never a designation. It was the original design. All of the others are
    mere interlopers inside the same outer shell. How convenient things were
    in the non-mil industries back then.

    Cannon didn't care. Sales are sales.

    But you keep that filter turned on, child.
     
  12. Bob Quintal

    Bob Quintal Guest


    I can too. James H. Cannon designed several series of connectors,
    including the XL and, later, the XLR.
    The IEC spec you refer to was created many years after the XLR-3 had
    become the de facto standard in pro audio.

    Go tally me bananas.
     
  13. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Michael A. Terrell = PSYCHO SCUM "

    ** The OP is obviously using 3 pins types and my reply to him is
    specifically about them.

    Now go **** a dead donkey - you PSYCHO




    ..... Phil
     
  14. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Mr Wallyman"
    ** Nonsense.

    ** This Wiki has it pretty much spot on.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XLR_connector

    " The XLR connector is a style of electrical connector, primarily found on
    professional audio, video, and stage lighting equipment. The connectors are
    circular in design and have between 3 and 7 pins. They are most commonly
    associated with balanced audio interconnection, including AES3 digital
    audio, but are also used for lighting control, low-voltage power supplies,
    and other applications. "


    Wallyman is an utter IDIOT !!



    ..... Phil
     
  15. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Bob Quintal"

    ** Hello Bob, have not heard from you in a while.

    Despite what the mind readers here may say, I am very familiar will the XLR
    and XLP series of connectors. Since the 1960s, there was a plant making them
    in Australia and there is still one making them under the Alcatel name.

    XLPs came first and were used for many jobs, including microphones. I think
    Shure were the first to put a 3 pin XLP style male socket on the bottom of a
    mic. Then everyone followed.

    The XLR series has some soft material surrounding females pins - mainly so
    that when mated with a male version, there is no looseness or movement.
    Important with hand held mics to prevent unwanted noises.

    Switchcraft had the same idea for microphones, they but used sprung steel
    balls instead to eliminate movement plus a very smooth external contour for
    user comfort. Overkill really.

    The only places I see 4 pin XLRs or XLPs being used is on headsets for
    talkback stations and a few PSUs for mixing desks - the later sometimes
    having 5 pins versions. So I keep a few of each on hand.

    BTW: I think the Neutrik versions are mostly flimsy and horrible.


    ..... Phil
     
  16. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Phil Allison"
    "Bob Quintal"

    ** Seems the XLR series dates from 1955 or so:

    http://www.coutant.org/xlrhist/history.pdf



    .... Phil
     
  17. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Phil Allison"
    See pic:

    http://www.guitarcenter.com/Switchcraft-A3F-Female-XLR-Plug-101185312-i1128971.gc

    The outer shell and body are made of stainless steel (ie non magnetic) and
    only the actuator is die cast.

    You can just see one of the two spring-loaded steel balls that stabilise the
    plug in the socket.

    AFAIK, the exact same connector has been on sale for over 40 years.

    The above retailer is asking $3.99 each.

    Not too shabby.


    ..... Phil
     
  18. MrTallyman

    MrTallyman Guest


    Then, it is NOT "stainless", idiot. Not at that price.
    Much more likely to be MAG. which is injection molded magnesium.

    Plated, cast zinc was the old way. The mag needs no plating, but often
    also gets it.
     
  19. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Mr Wallyman" :

    ** I have one in my workshop, exactly like in the pic.

    It is rather heavy, made of quite hard steel and magnets have no effect.

    Do you not get what FOAD means ?

    I sincerely hope your is a long and very painful death.




    .... Phil
     
  20. MrTallyman

    MrTallyman Guest

    It isn't "stainless steel", idiot.

    the fact that you are oblivious to that 'tid-bit' is no fucking
    surprise. And of course, quite a tell about you as well.

    Yeah, dumbfuck, I DO know what FOAD means. You should go do so.
     
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