Connect with us

Xbox one analog stick pin description

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Aubrey Champagne, May 27, 2016.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Aubrey Champagne

    Aubrey Champagne

    10
    0
    May 8, 2016
    Does anyone know where I can get a pin description for an Xbox one analog stick?

    If not could some one help me understand the pins. An image is attached
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Kind of a poor pic...
    The joysticks used in the Xbox, Xbox-S, and Xbox 360 controllers as far as I know are all simple just a pair of potentiometers. The joystick there looks the same.

    Notice the 2 groups of 3 pins?
    One group of 3 will be for the X axis, the other for the Y axis.
    There may be an additional pair of wires for the embedded push-button for when the joystick is depressed...
    In any case... The group of 3 wires are usually power, signal, ground. Signal is an analogue voltage between power and 0V (ground) and is fed into a DAC.
    You could also measure the resistance from the middle pin to either one of the other two. As you move the stick, the resistance will vary.

    You can, of course measure yourself... measure resistance with the groups of 3 to determine which one is responsible for each axis. The pin that changes as the stick moves is signal. The other two pins are power and ground... and can be swapped to 'invert' the direction the joystick is interpreted as.
    The pair of pins responsible for the depressing the stick can be found the same way... measure, test, observe. Repeat until all the pins are labelled.
     
  3. Aubrey Champagne

    Aubrey Champagne

    10
    0
    May 8, 2016
    So I should have one pin hooked up to positive, one to ground, and one to the encoder?
     
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Yup... although... there is a catch.
    It's *usually* , +V, Signal, -V .
    -V = 0V, negative battery terminal, or ground.
    +V could be 5V, or 3.3V as the most common values.
    Signal will go to the encoder... and by encoder, you mean DAC. It will convert the analogue voltage to a digital value. If your DAC is a 3.3V DAC, do *not* use 5V on the joystick.
    The DAC will return a value close to 50% of it's highest value while the joystick is at rest.
    You need one DAC per axis.

    If in doubt. Measure first!
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-