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xbox 360 regulator

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by olfogie1, Jan 2, 2011.

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  1. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    I need to replace what I believe to be a 3.3v fixed service mount transistor vr but I am having a problem finding one. The id number on it is 17-33g but I have not found a cross reference number except possibly an NCP1117 but even if it would work I have not been able to find one of them without ordering a quantity of 40 or more which at the most I might want would be 2 so this is some serious overkill. If any one can help with a part number and supplier I would greatly appreciate it.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, firstly, the description of it as a 3.3v fixed service mount transistor seems muddled. I presume you mean a surface mount fixed 3.3v regulator.

    Without knowing the package and the current and input voltage we couldn't really suggest a replacement. Even then, we would be unable to know the original specs with regard to many other ratings, nor the values of any input and output caps which, although not highly critical, may need to be within a particular range.

    Having said all of that, digikey have about 3,500 different devices matching your limited specs, many of which they sell in quantities of 1 (such as this one)
     
  3. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    Thanks for the input and I have checked this site but that part is a completely different stile to whats on the board. I was hopeful that someone would have a cross reference for the 17-33g as I'm sure the output voltage is fixed at 3.3 with input between 10-20 I think. as this is in a xbox 360 there should not be any high voltages involved so these values should be in the ball park.
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    I think its time you showed us all a close in and well focussed pic of the part and its surrounding cct, so that we can try and figure out what you are talking about :)

    Dave
     
  5. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
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    Jul 31, 2009
    Agreed.

    SMD code markings are closely related to package type. They can mean completely different things on different pakages & are not easy to decode. The brand may even play a role.

    At least Google SMD outlines and see if you can recognize something. I'd expect that regulator to be a DPAK (TO-252) or the bigger D2PAK (TO-263).
     
  6. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    Well I thank you all for the help but this is a lost cause as I do not have a web site to upload a photo to so I can not provide any URL to view the photo. Seems like a major pain not to be able to just upload a pix and insert it into a posting. Again thanks for the help and sorry to have wasted your time.
     
  7. Ian

    Ian Administrator

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    Aug 23, 2006
    You can upload and attach an image using this website :)

    If you click "post reply" at the bottom of this thread, you can use the "manage attachments" button or click the paperclip icon to upload an image to the site.
     
  8. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    360 vr

    Ok I'll give it a shot.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,474
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Good picture :)

    Before we go too far down this path, It is probably worth asking why you think this part is dead. I presume you have measured the input and output voltages and found that there is no output but the input voltage is present?

    Here is a pdf that has the specs for TO-252 and TO-263. As Resqueline suggests, these seem most likely, and you should confirm which one it is.

    You could hen go to digikey's web site and see what is available in that package, but knowing the input voltage and the output current required would be great (the former is easier than the latter).

    Are you equipped to remove and replace a surface mount component like this?
     
  10. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    I have already removed the part and I am sure it is bad even though I took no measurements as the face of it appears to be cracked as you can run a sharp tip like that of an xactro knife across it and you can feel it catch where the line goes across it. I have seen this type of transistor do the same thing in other pieces of electronics I have worked on. And yes I have several styles of soldering irons as well as a rework station. From the looks of it the TO252 would be what I am after.
     
  11. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
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    Jul 31, 2009
    Ok; sounds like it's cracked, and that it would be best to not replace it with an identical brand, but with the best one can find. DigiKey has a number of candidates.
    Here is one that stands up to 150 deg. C, 12V input, and 1.5A (not likely all at the same time though). Some of them can even handle up to 5A btw..
     
  12. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    Thanks for the information and help. I am going to see about ordering this the weird part of all this is that it was just on the face of the transistor and had not gone down the sides as I have seen before. I don't know though weither it was a component failure or if somebody did a poor re-flow job on it as I have also had to replace a electrolytic condenser that was showing signs of beginning to bulge at the top. So much thanks for the assistance in this matter.
     
  13. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,474
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    Look, my concern (and it may not be well founded) is that you might end up with a part that doesn't work.

    Is it possible to measure the input voltage? That should be the voltage between pin 1 and 2 (the tab).

    It is possible that a low drop-out regulator is required here. It is also possible that a high current regulator is required (but I suspect the designer may have used a small buck regulator in that case).

    If the voltage at the input of the regulator is less than 6V then you will need to check the specs to ensure that sufficient margin is available to maintain regulation.
     
  14. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    Well the part is on a xbox 360 mobo I can try to measure the voltage but I'll have to put it back together enough for the console to work. The original problem was suppose to be with the Ethernet port as it had a e73 error and as its location is not any where near the power supply components so I would think the voltages would not be all that high as I think it's main purpose is to maintain a constant stable 3.3v but not having a diagram it is a bit hard to confirm that believe.
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,474
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, well first you really need to confirm your suspicion that it is indeed a 3 terminal regulator. (Well we assumed that was your belief)

    A 3 terminal regulator is pretty easy to figure out. Pin 2 will be connected to ground. Ground should be very easy to spot, and if you can determine the ground pin of any nearby IC then you should see continuity. If it is an adjustable regulator (unlikely) then thee will be some resistance here.

    Assuming pin 2 is grounded, pin 3 is the output and you should see continuity between this pin and any 3.3V chips it powers.

    That leaves pin 1 which is the input and will be connected to some power rail. If you are lucky it will have continuity back to a power supply connector -- In this case I would tend to suspect it will be connected to +5V.

    If all those are true then you have an almost 100% likelihood of this being a 3 terminal regulator,

    You should also find capacitor(s) connected between pins 1 and 2 and pins 2 and 3. I see one capacitor (small chip capacitor) that is likely to be between pin 1 and 2, and possibly the larger electrolytic to the right is the output capacitor (between pins 2 and 3) -- what voltage rating does it have?
     
  16. olfogie1

    olfogie1

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    Jan 2, 2011
    The cap next to it is 16v theres 3 others below it at the same and a 4 and 10 in about a 3 inch circle around it.
     
  17. SLRatXbox

    SLRatXbox

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    Jan 12, 2014
    3.3v regulator

    Hi

    Having problems in the same area my self. 3.3V supply line short circuit to earth. I broke the 13-33G trying to lift pin. Short still present tho:-(.

    I tracked down the manufacturer who gave the following reply. The part is available from RSonline as well.

    ""Thank you for contacting ON Semiconductor.

    It is 3.3 V regulator and it has product number NCP1117DT33RKG. You can order is directly from our web page or through our sales office or authorized distributors:

    http://onsemi.com/PowerSolutions/product.do?id=NCP1117""
     
  18. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,165
    1,087
    Dec 18, 2013
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