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WTF ! MIT to eliminate power cords ?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Eeyore, Jun 8, 2007.

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  1. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    The end of the plug? Scientists invent wireless device that beams electricity
    through your home.

    The team from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who call their invention
    'WiTricity', believe it could change the way we use electricity and do away with
    the tangle of cables, plugs and chargers that clutter modern homes.

    It could also allow the use of laptops and mobile phones without batteries.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...ogy.html?in_article_id=460602&in_page_id=1965

    I also found this older article


    " You may one day be able to recharge your laptop or mobile phone without having
    to plug it into the wall, says a US physicist.

    Prof Soljacic says he has found a way of transmitting energy so that only the
    devices that it is recharging will pick it up, so it will not affect humans.

    Instead of using traditional radiation, he wants to use the part of the
    electromagnetic field that is 'non-radiative'.

    He says devices can be tuned to the frequency of this field and thus act as a
    sink for all the energy the transmitter gives out. "

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200611/s1789387.htm

    Graham
     
  2. more stuff here
    http://www.physorg.com/news100445957.html

    Bet it will hide all those WiFi allergy symptoms


    martin
     
  3. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Hello...Mr.Tesla...
    "Huhhh...I'm dead...leave me alone.."
    Yah..but somebody's thinking of broadcasting power again..
    "Brainnnnzzz (like a zombie)....must eat brainnzzz... Tesla...go eat
    brains now.." :p



    D from BC
     
  4. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    LOL !

    It gets rid of the power cord but just look at the size of that coil ! What a bunch of loonies.

    I hate to imagine how 'ungreen' it must be in terms of efficiency too.

    Graham
     
  5. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    " Various methods of transmitting power wirelessly have been known for centuries."

    Centuries (pl) ? That must means at least 2 centuries.

    Who knew about transmitting power wirelessly in 1807 or before ?

    Graham
     
  6. Guest

    I sure hope they're well embarrassed for claiming to have invented
    anything in that area. How much funding do you suppose it will get
    them?

    BTW, I believe it stated in that very article (which I don't at all
    blame you for not reading in its entirety) that efficiency was on the
    order of ~42%, and that they'd have to spend two to five years working
    on it in order to double it to a useable level.

    Maybe for their next trick they'll reinvent AC.
     
  7. Guest

    Sorry about that, it seems I read a different article than linked to
    here. Can you really blame me for not wanting to read it twice? Here's
    another article where they comment on the efficiency of it anyway:

    http://canadaeast.com/ce2/docroot/article.php?articleID=8310
     
  8. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    My apologies, MIT has gone Demoncrat on us. This deviation from the
    true MIT "nuts and bolts" engineering was a big contributor to my
    deciding to retire from the Educational Council in April :-(

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  9. z

    z Guest

    People have been hauling wagonloads of coal and firewood for centuries.
     
  10. z

    z Guest

    Popular electronics or some such, way back when had a schematic for a
    batteryless transistor radio, which was powered by the signal from a
    strong local station to power a separate tuner that you listened to.
    (crystal earphones only, please).
     
  11. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    No, no Jim, you should *encourage* this trend -- more consulting work for you
    in the future! :)

    There was a guy at the last Oregon State University engineering expo who had,
    as his project... an... 8:1 multiplexer... built using... TTL logic.
    Oooooohhhh! Aaaahhhh!

    At least he didn't use a microcontroller?
     

  12. Now if it was a TTL Analog Multiplexer it would have been
    interesting.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  13. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    I also discovered it did not go over well when I commented, "I just
    met some recent MIT grads who went to work at Intel. I've known
    robots with more personality and creativity" ;-)

    ...Jim Thompson
     

  14. 'C3PO' or 'Marvin. the paranoid android'?


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  15. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    Nice. :)

    There was a section of that last engineering expo devoted to "green"
    technologies -- which I think is perfectly reasonable to encourage! -- but I
    was incredulous that groups would have projects such as a wind-powered water
    heater and they hadn't measured the *efficiency* of their designs. Sheesh...
    (The groups were "multi-disciplinary" in that often there'd be some EEs and
    MEs paired, some were "EE heavy" or "ME heavy" and it seemed like the "ME
    heavy" groups often had a better grasp of, "Yeah, it works, but how does it
    compare to the currently available off-the-shelf solutions in terms of cost,
    efficiency, strength, etc..." -- I have a suspicion that there's a greater
    percentage of MEs who had hands-on experience as gearheads or whatever than
    there are EEs who've messed around with radios or robots or whatever prior to
    college these days...)
     
  16. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    So, I see Dr. Tesla's Induction Coil is back in fashion this year. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  17. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    I think there several unfortunate changes...

    Anyone know a kid who "tinkers" with electronics, builds his own
    stuff, _even_ from kits?

    Even MIT now calls the department "Electrical Engineering and Computer
    Science".

    I'm of the old school... I wouldn't allow calculators until college,
    and no simulators until senior year ;-)

    It's pretty clear from the postings on just this newsgroup that the
    youth of this day (and even most adults) don't have a clue about
    electronic fundamentals... if they can't cut and paste it from some
    App Note they don't have even a single idea as to where to begin :-(

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  18. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    Not personally, but I'm sure they're out there.
    Same at OSU these days; they merged a couple of years ago.
    That strikes me as a little overly draconian, but I take your point. :)
     
  19. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Sounds like there are some shysters that want lots of money and do
    not care about a "little" fraud.
    An electromagnetic field, BY DEFINITION cannot be "non-radiative" !!
    Furthermore, by definition, something that is "non-radiative" goes
    nowhere (unless we are talking about a gas which *diffuses* or a liquid
    that *flows*).

    Then again, the subject is about money that does not radiate from
    suckers to liars.
     
  20. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    I ain't no historian and do not pay attention to dates; but i
    understand that Hertz was not the first to do a little demonstration...
     
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