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wtb: books,manuals etc on older microprocessor 6502,z80 etc

Discussion in 'Hobby Electronics' started by mc, Jan 5, 2004.

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  1. mc

    mc Guest

    hi after any books manuals etc any printed material on older type
    microprocessors eg 6502, sc/mp,z80,8080,8085,6800,68000,etc. If you have
    any of the books on processors or their interfacing ..and happy to part
    with them .. let me know of what you have and how much .. also after any
    older style early development boards utilizing early microprocessors ..
     
  2. Grant R

    Grant R Guest

    Ladies and gentlemen,
    bought the Jaycar modules (QC3590) etc, downloaded the .pdf, but it
    fails to give the actual antenna connections! Any clues before I start
    to rip the sheilded package apart?
    Grant R
     
  3. gcd

    gcd Guest

    Hi,
    from the pics in the pdf file it looks like there is a small PCB protusion
    form the case. This would appear to be your antenna conections. the centre
    track for the centre of your coax and the outer for the screen.

    Hope that helps
    Greg
     
  4. gcd

    gcd Guest

    oh, yeh forgot to ask, why is this here under the op?
     
  5. TheBeaver

    TheBeaver Guest

    : hi after any books manuals etc any printed material on older type
    : microprocessors eg 6502, sc/mp,z80,8080,8085,6800,68000,etc. If you have
    : any of the books on processors or their interfacing ..and happy to part
    : with them .. let me know of what you have and how much .. also after any
    : older style early development boards utilizing early microprocessors ..

    Why fork out good money for them?
    Motorola has all their manuals on their site in PDF format so go there and
    get them for free.
    Then go to Zilog's site and send them an email asking for a Z80 manual for a
    "prototype" and they will post you their Z80 manual for free.
    Note that the 8080 is the predecessor to the Z80. It was made by the same
    guys when they worked for Intel. the Z80 is a majorly enhanced version but
    still compatible.
     
  6. Grant R

    Grant R Guest

    Hello Greg,
    Not quite sure what you mean by the op?
    Am using Agent, posted only to aus.electronics and posted as a new
    thread (according to my headers)
    Am curious
    Grant R
    PS the info about the connection of course makes sense- many thanks
     
  7. gcd

    gcd Guest

    Hi Grant,
    well perhaps it's my ISP again. Your message is threaded as a reply to mc's
    post on old micro books.
    Good luck with the 2.4 Ghz stuff. There is another mob that sells that type
    of equipment that may be worth looking at, try http://www.allthings.com.au
    located in WA. I've bought cameras and transmitters etc from them in the
    past.

    Cheers
    Greg
     
  8. Grant R

    Grant R Guest

    Hello Greg,
    Yes I've used stuff from allthings before- just thought I'd give these
    ones a go. You know, sort of striving for perfection and attempting to
    do it for nothing! :)
    Cheers
    Grant
     
  9. TheBeaver

    TheBeaver Guest

    Wasn't the V20 just NEC's version of the 286?

    :
    :
    : : > : > : hi after any books manuals etc any printed material on older type
    : > : microprocessors eg 6502, sc/mp,z80,8080,8085,6800,68000,etc. If you
    have
    : > : any of the books on processors or their interfacing ..and happy to
    part
    : > : with them .. let me know of what you have and how much .. also after
    any
    : > : older style early development boards utilizing early microprocessors
    ...
    : >
    : > Why fork out good money for them?
    : > Motorola has all their manuals on their site in PDF format so go there
    and
    : > get them for free.
    : > Then go to Zilog's site and send them an email asking for a Z80 manual
    for
    : a
    : > "prototype" and they will post you their Z80 manual for free.
    : > Note that the 8080 is the predecessor to the Z80. It was made by the
    same
    : > guys when they worked for Intel. the Z80 is a majorly enhanced version
    but
    : > still compatible.
    :
    :
    : hay, don't forget the V20 chip that ran both z80 code and 8088 code. i
    : think it also ran code for soemthing else too, but i cant rmemeber
    anymore.
    : I miss my old Microbee and the day when "hacker" was not a dirty word.
    :
    : --
    : "mail=valid" must be in the e-mail body for mail to work.
    : "file=valid" must be in the e-mail body for file attach to work.
    : Dyslexia and Spell Checkers do not mix.
    :
    :
    :
    :
     
  10. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    'Just'?? Man, that thing was *fast*! I think it came out as an 8MHz beast!
    :)

    Ken
     
  11. It was (still is!) compatible with the 8088, drop-in replacement. A
    popular device to speed up your machine back in the old PC days. Lower
    power too, so was popular in laptops.
    And yeah, I think it was also Z80 compatible somehow...
    NEC had a whole range of the V series chips. The V30 was the 8086
    compatible version from memory.

    and what about those super fast 80bit IIT math co-processors!

    Geeze that brings back memories...

    Regards
    Dave :)
     
  12. aussieblu

    aussieblu Guest

    Yes Enjoy Dialup I also still have sentimental feelings about
    Microbees too. In fact I have about 30 Microbees and related
    manuals, documentation etc, about 25 green and/or orange
    monitors and 1/2 dozens dot matrix and daisy wheels printers in
    my shed that I just don't have the heart to throw out or give
    away...yet. Doubtless the day after I throw them out they will
    become valuable collectables.

    Regards
    Blue

    Remove Z from email address to reply directly.
     
  13. aussieblu

    aussieblu Guest

    Oh and I have also got dozens of 300 and 1200 baud modems.
    Can't see them ever becoming collectables though.
     
  14. mc

    mc Guest

    if you have 30 of them you be able to sell few then ..:)
     
  15. Legend

    Legend Guest

    No I had a V20 chip in an XT motherboard I think it ran at 2.8Mhz... no
    it was not a 286
     
  16. Rod Out back

    Rod Out back Guest

    Hazey memories here...

    I vaguely recall the V20 & V30 chips from NEC were far more capable than the
    8086 & 8088 chips they emulated. I thought they both ran a 16 bit
    architecture, but the restriction was more in the peripherals available that
    could run with them? At the same time, I thought the 8086 was a 16-bit
    internal architecture, running 8-bit access to the outside world, and the
    8088 was simply 8-bit inside & out.

    I remember seeing a Microbyte PC running on a V30 chip, and being blown away
    by how advanced they were for the time. Intelligent fan speed, upgradeable
    bios via floppy disk, built-in scsi, built-in game port, video port, etc,
    etc, etc.

    Our microwave is probably more intelligent now....sigh.

    Cheers,

    Rod.........Out Back
     
  17. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    Here's a good reference:
    http://grafi.ii.pw.edu.pl/gbm/x86/16bit.html

    Takes me back a while - I recall writing a video driver routine which needed
    to recognise CPU and video chip, amongst other things. Man I am so glad I
    don't do that any more! :)

    Cheers.

    Ken
     
  18. Mark Harriss

    Mark Harriss Guest

    2*2=3.999997

    Regards
    Mark
     
  19. I didn't think there was any difference in code between the 8088 and
    8086? Both were functionally identical except that the 8086 accessed
    through a 16bit bus. The 8088 came out after the 8086 to allow the use
    of cheaper 8 bit interface components.

    Dave :)
     
  20. Mike Harding

    Mike Harding Guest

    OS2 - Probably the best operating system we never had.

    Mike Harding
     
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