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Written pole motors

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Dean Hoffman, Jun 8, 2010.

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  1. Dean Hoffman

    Dean Hoffman Guest

    This U.S. company says they can make larger single phase motors up
    to 75 horsepower. I was wondering about the good and bad points of
    this. http://tinyurl.com/24c92bs

    Thanks.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    IF claims are as stated.
    How does the stator adapt to the necessary conditions without some sort of
    feedback control? It appears to be a variation of previously existing PM
    motor technology.
    It may be very good but, surely, on the basis of the reference- there is no
    more than PR handwaving.
     
  3. daestrom

    daestrom Guest

    Just looking at the numbers in the table under 'Benefits of Technology'
    (page 3), there are some discrepancies. For the conventional 3-phase
    motor, the power doesn't work out right for a 0.85 power factor. Nor
    does the stated kVA.

    If the technology's valid, I can see a niche market were you need a
    low-starting current motor. But it seems like the added complexity
    would result in a higher price for 'average installations'.

    daestrom
     
  4. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    On the surface this sounds a lot like the old repulsion-induction
    motors. Wasn't low starting current one of the big advantages of those?
     
  5. I have been involved in testing some of these as well as applying them in
    the field. They do work. The downside? More expensive, more complicated.

    Charles Perry P.E.
     
  6. Dean Hoffman

    Dean Hoffman Guest

    Can one make any educated guesses about durability? I was
    thinking of the irrigation application mentioned by John Gilmer.
    Irrigation well motors generally sit outside. They are usually in the
    50 to 75 hp. range in my area. They get hit by blowing dirt, crop
    dust, precipitation, and whatever else the wind can carry. Lightning,
    and air temperatures ranging from about -20ºF to over 100ºF are part of
    the deal.

    Thanks

    Dean
     
  7. I know of units that have been in the field for over 10 years. I have not
    heard of any reliability issues.

    Charles Perry P.E.
     
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