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Would this switch stand?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by TheMaster, Nov 15, 2016.

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  1. TheMaster

    TheMaster

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    Jul 20, 2016
    I need a cheap, SMD toggle switch capable of conducting aprox. 200mA at 6v.
    I thought my prayers were answered when I found this, only to find out its rating is 300mA / 5V.

    Could it stand continued use at aprox. 170 mA / 5.7V, or is this pushing it?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2016
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Possibly, but you're operating the switch out of specs. Not really recommended.
    How about this one? 0.3 A at 6 V.
     
  3. TheMaster

    TheMaster

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    Jul 20, 2016
    Yes only that one costs four times as much (this, smd variant, would probably be my 2nd best option)

    Would it still be out of spec considering the current is much lower...
    For instance a similar switch says: 0.3 A at 6 VDC, 0.1 A at 30 VDC
    So maybe since my current is lower, the voltage rating increases? Or is that just being optimistic.
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,025
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    Nov 17, 2011
    Your chances are good that a 5 V rated switch will work at 6 V, too, especially at the low currents you are considering. It's just a matter of being outside the specs and you will not be able to blame anyone but yourself if the switch doesn't operate as reliably as you expect.
     
  5. TheMaster

    TheMaster

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    Jul 20, 2016
    Okay, last questions: Any QA suggestions? Should I just toggle the switch a bunch of times and leave it open/closed for long periods of time...
    And while I'm at it: What are those plastic knobs protruding from the bottom? Are those in order to secure the switch to the board while manipulating the switch; to avoid peeling off the pads? So I have to drill holes for those right?

    Edit: Does is conduct between Pos #1: 1,2,3 ; Pos #2: 2,3 OR Pos #1: 1,3 ; Pos #2: 2,3 ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2016
  6. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    veeeerrrryyy long periods of time.
    There's no use in testing a single switch to gain insight into the quality. You'd have to test hundreds or thousands to get any meaningful statistic.

    Exactly.

    The (so called :rolleyes:) circuit diagram indicates a sliding contact that either closes 1-2 or 2-3,
    2 being the center contact. Which terminal is '1' is shown under 'Dimensions'.
     
  7. TheMaster

    TheMaster

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    Jul 20, 2016
    Wait....How sure are you about that?
    That diagram is unclear to me...
     
  8. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    As sure as one can be given that 'datasheet'.
    The contact assignment should be the least of your problems. You can always check with an Ohmmeter (Multimeter in Ohm range).
     
  9. TheMaster

    TheMaster

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    Jul 20, 2016
    Yeah I think you're right.

    But I'm not so sure that I have a problem actually. And if I do, I think it can be tested easily.
    The rating says 5v 300ma. I take that as meaning that when closed current shouldn't exceed 300ma, and when open voltage shouldn't exceed 5v.

    (I'm using this as a two mode toggle)
    In my case when closed the current is 200ma and voltage is 0 - no problem.
    When open voltage is 5.7 and current is 0 - might be a problem, but I am confident that given the small excess voltage, there would be no arcing while in the open position and hence no potential for damage.
    Damage could only occur in the transition between states, and that being said the power of any potential arc which may develop would not be greater than that given in their ratings.
    So QA could be done by just flicking the switch many many times, not by waiting long periods of time.

    Do you believe this assessment to be correct?
     
  10. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    See post #4.

    How many times do you want to actuate the switch? To get a useful statistical assessment you 'd still have to test hundreds or thousands of switches. That's what the manufacturer does (or should do) in order to verify the datasheet specifications.

    Is this a one-of-a-kind project fpr yourself, then don't hesitate, use this switch.
    Is this going to be mass produced? ´Better look for a switch that is fully qualified for your application.
     
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