Connect with us

Working with micro connectors

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by medusa569, Sep 4, 2013.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. medusa569

    medusa569

    13
    0
    Apr 7, 2010
    As a newbie I have had little encounters with mini and micro components and my tools are few. In trying to trouble shoot my pc monitor I have come across a connector so fine my hemostat clips are too big to deal with . I assume it slides out like all the other modular connectors but I can manage without risking breaking the wire or the connector itself. How do I disengage this type of connector?? I'd also like some opinions as to the necessary tool box for the working with the smaller components. thanks in advance. :confused:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,773
    493
    Jan 15, 2010
    Looks to me like the white (large) connector is soldered to the board.
    Make sure there on no clips that need to be disengaged on that connector, to remove
    the cable connector.
    Then stick a small screwdriver under the ends of the cable connector, and gently pry
    the cable connector (a little pressure on one side, then the other, back and forth),
    until the cable connector is out of the board connector.
    Gently.
     
  3. medusa569

    medusa569

    13
    0
    Apr 7, 2010
    OK now I am FUBARED. The connector broke. Its outa there but non the less broken. On of the terminals has no seating. So now I have to find a new connector. In electronics how does one go about find out what type of connector it is and its size?? I only know its a wire to board right angle connector. At least now I can test the board....god I hate these really small delicate things....its not so bad when its the larger components.



     
  4. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,270
    Nov 28, 2011
    Start by counting the pins and determining the pin pitch. Measure the distance from one end pin to the other and divide that by one less than the number of pins to get the pin pitch.

    Also look for any markings that might indicate the manufacturer. Often there will be a manufacturer's logo imprinted on the plastic somewhere.

    Then go to Digikey and look in their Connectors sections, using the calculated pin pitch and number of pins to narrow down your options. Look through the manufacturers that they stock and try to match them with any markings you found on the connector.

    Digikey have a number of categories below Connectors and I've found that connectors may be in what seems to be the wrong category, so try all the categories that look like they might be applicable.

    You'll have to try to match the connector by its appearance. You may be able to use some of the filter fields to narrow down the options, but again I've found that they sometimes describe things differently from how I would describe them. Before you filter your options in this way, look at some of the matches and how they are described in the results table, to make sure you're selecting the right option(s) when you filter.

    Once you've found the manufacturer and the series, you should be able to find both parts of the connector. The pin header that mounts to the PCB is probably a single part, but the female cable plug (if you need to replace it) may be sold as a housing and a separate packet of crimp pins.

    If you need to replace the PCB pin header, be very careful when desoldering the original. If possible, beg or borrow a desoldering station, or use desoldering wick. A spring-type solder sucker needs to be used with caution because it can damage the PCB and break tracks or lift pads.

    Good luck!
     
  5. medusa569

    medusa569

    13
    0
    Apr 7, 2010
    Entering Mini world

    So that's how pitch is determined! Thanks much for enlightening me. I am lucky enough to have a desoldering station so my work to light there. It's just now getting the small hand tools to work with these smaller parts and working with these smaller scale items. Thank you for your help.





     
  6. medusa569

    medusa569

    13
    0
    Apr 7, 2010
    Identification of connectors and pins

    The trouble with Digikey is that they lack too many pictures of their items. For me that is paramount for newbies in trying to locate their items. Mouser had more pictures but a more difficult filter system. Another approach is trying to find the pins and then backtrack according to their pins description however these pins I've not seen before. I an accustomed to the standard molex type ( round , square and blade) connectors, The one here is a tong like twin extension. Any idea what type of terminal this is??




     

    Attached Files:

  7. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,270
    Nov 28, 2011
    You're right that Digikey have pictures missing.

    For connectors with that style, there are many manufacturers, and each has many product lines, and I have very little experience with them, sorry.
     
  8. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,773
    493
    Jan 15, 2010
    Look, you're not FUBAR'd.
    If you can't find mfgr part numbers on your connectors, and you're not sure how to
    find a replacement set by measuring what the connectors are:
    Check the pin measurements on your PCB (it's called the connector footprint).
    Find a matching connector of ANY type you like, that'll solder into the PCB holes, and that
    you can buy a mating cable connector for:
    and replace the both of them.
    Now you've got a connector set you like, and you have the replacement part numbers
    for if you ever think you're FUBAR'd again.
     
  9. medusa569

    medusa569

    13
    0
    Apr 7, 2010
    Replacing connenctors

    Yes i did of course consider this. I was nervous about plunging into that as It would require me to buy some new wire strippers and crimpers for the ultra tiny wiring these use. I didn't want to spend that kind of money right now but I think I'll have no choice. No one to borrow from and to be honest after 22 and 24 I've never worked with smaller wires and don't know what gauge is what thereafter. I wish they'd sell samples swatches and such :p But for the price it's probably wise to have some spares in the parts bin as these do tend to become brittle. I'm feeling less "fooed" already .;)



     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-