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worker-guy tip for the day

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by John Larkin, Jan 8, 2006.

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  1. John  Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    If you're out there with one of those 2000 psi pressure washers,
    blowing all the mold and gunk off the decks, and you get a bunch of
    iccky stuff on your hand, really try to avoid the temptation to wash
    it off the obvious way.

    Trust me on this one.

    John
     
  2. Phil Hobbs

    Phil Hobbs Guest

    Ouch. Feel like telling us the sad story?

    Cheers,

    Phil Hobbs
     
  3. *ouch*. I remember my dad telling me that on the navy ships they
    warned them not to go poking around high pressure steam lines with
    your fingers, lest there be a tiny invisible leak of high pressure
    superheated steam that could slice off your fingers.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  4. It can inject the pressurized water, plus any garbage you might have on
    your hands, into your bloodstream. Make sure your tetanus shots are up
    to date if this happens.
     
  5. John  Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    Yeah, I used to work in steamship engine rooms. If they suspected a
    tiny leak in one of the welds (all the piping joints were welded)
    they'd wave a broomstick around. A tiny, silent leak would just cut it
    in half.

    John
     
  6. John  Larkin

    John Larkin Guest


    No big deal. It's the rainy season here, and we live on the south side
    of our street (it's also the gay side of the street, but that's a
    whole nother story) so lots of stuff out front (sidewalks, stairs,
    decks) gets green, so I was out there power-washing. I whacked my hand
    from maybe 2 feet away, and at least didn't rip the skin off too much.
    Felt like a liquid shotgun.

    Better than snow blowing, I guess.

    Oh, the batting cage is up! Possibly the only batting cage in downtown
    San Francisco, although there are rumors of one other. Beats a
    foosball machine for sure. And it looks like I won't have to
    instrument the ball speed... the new Juggs machine has an LCD that
    reads directly in mph, and I'm inclined to believe it.

    John
     
  7. I wish Icould understand the american dialect and terminology of
    English


    martin
     
  8. Noone

    Noone Guest

    My dad used to have a sandblaster and I would get pressed into duty
    running it. Everyone wants to know how fast the sand come out when
    under pressure and everyone tests it. But just once.

    Blakely
     
  9. John  Larkin

    John Larkin Guest



    Oh, sorry.

    1 mph = 1.609344 kph

    John
     
  10. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    mph, even 'feet', we can understand - 'foosball' is quaint but what the heck
    is a 'batting cage'? A Juggs machine I'm assuming is down at the Hooters
    bar??

    Cheers.

    Ken
     
  11. Mike Young

    Mike Young Guest

    Batting is the act of hitting a baseball. You can piece it together from
    there. Juggs is presumably a brand of machine that pitches the baseball.
    Now, how about a succinct description of cricket.
     
  12. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    Got five days? Takes that long for a Test Match (which begs the question:
    how long for a real one?).

    Cheers.

    Ken
    (Who only ever really enjoyed in Australian Rules football.....)
     
  13. Cricket -
    BAtting is the act of hitting the cricket ball.
    A batter or batsman is the hitter of the cricket ball

    Juggs equivelent in cricket would have to be the bowler, that is the
    one who bowls the ball. Note, there is a difference bettween
    throwing(chucking) and bowling, and the former is illegal in cricket.

    When training, the bowler will bowl to a batsman in the nets. The nets
    are probably the equivelent of the batting cage.
    Succint, not easy.

    A bowler bowls a ball to the batsman. The batsman attemtps to hit it.
    When he hits the ball, he has to run betweem the stumps, which are
    placed at either end of the pitch, which is a concrete like piece of
    grass in the middle of the oval(park?). Each time he runs between the
    from one set of stumps (aka wickets), to the other end, he gets a run.
    If a fielder was to throw the ball and hit the stumps whilst the
    batsman was outside of his grounds (the area about 1 meter in fromt of
    the stupms) then the batsman is deemed to be out. If a fielder catches
    a ball on the full, then the batsman is deemed to be out.

    Now, if the bowler was to bowl and hit the stumps, then batsman is
    deemed to be out. If the bowler hits the batsman's legs in such a
    fashion that if the batsmans legs were not there then the stupms would
    be hit, then he is deemed to be out also (Leg Before Wickets).

    10 wickets = 1 innings. When an innings is complete the other team
    bats. In test cricket, each team gets 2 innings, One day matches each
    team gets one innings.

    This is the shortest explanation I could find
    http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/hosking/cricket/explanation.htm
     
  14. Paul Burke

    Paul Burke Guest

    Cricket

    You have two side one out in the field and one in.

    Each man that's in the side that's in goes out and when he's out he
    comes in, and the next man goes in until he's out.

    When they are all out the side that's out comes in and the side that's
    been in goes out tries to get those coming in out.

    Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

    When both sides have been in and out including the not outs, that's the
    end of the game.
     
  15. "An ancient ritual that brings rain"??
     
  16. YD

    YD Guest

    Uninsulated pipes? Or did they remove the insulation for the testing?

    - YD.
     
  17. John  Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    The small pipes, to pressure gages and sight glasses and transducers,
    were usually uninsulated, filled up with warm steam or cold water I
    guess.

    John
     
  18. Andy Peters

    Andy Peters Guest

    Why is the word "innings" used as a singular in the equality "10
    wickets = 1 innings" ???

    -a
     
  19. Barry Lennox

    Barry Lennox Guest

    It's also an occupational hazard in the aerospace industry, pinhole
    leaks in 2000-3000 psi hydraulic lines. I'm only aware of one
    accident, but it seems there are a few each year.

    Barry Lennox
     
  20. John Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    Don't you have foosball over there?

    http://www.tablesoccer.com/

    During the height of the dot.com insanity, no self-respecting
    Perl-pounding solutions provider would dare have a facility without an
    expresso bar and a foosball table. After the crash, you couldn't give
    the damned things away.

    Stupid, annoying game if you ask me.

    The batting cage is a net enclosure, 11x11x55 feet in size. Near one
    end is the Juggs electric pitching machine; at the other end is a
    "home plate" where the batter stands, and a backstop to absorb the
    kinetic energy of the ones she misses. It's a "softball", somewhat
    bigger than a baseball, and there's nothing soft about it. The Juggs
    can hurl them at 70 mph, and it's terrifying. The Brat, when she
    connects, can send them back at the ball feeder (ie, me) even faster.
    We rigged up a net screen which I hide behind for some nominal
    protection.

    Slow-pitch softball is a very popular coed sports activity here,
    involving a lot of beer and flirting after the games. The Brat plays
    fast-pitch for Cornell, very much like US baseball, very intense.
    Recent legal decisions mandate that girls sports receive equal funding
    as boys, so girls softball, and girls sports in general, are finally
    getting serious coaching and funding.

    Do girls play cricket?

    John
     
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