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Wiring Guitar Effects Pedal Power socket

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Lawrenciumbc, Sep 16, 2016.

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  1. Lawrenciumbc

    Lawrenciumbc

    41
    0
    Nov 2, 2015
    I am building an effects pedal from a kit (Effects pedal link), this is my first pedal build and its a really basic question I just want to clarify:

    I am wiring the DC socket and just want to be totally sure which way round I am wiring the 9V supply and Ground (as per the schematic.

    I know that guitar pedals normally use -ve polarity psu's so does that mean I should solder the 'ground' on the schematic to the center pin of the socket and the '9v' supply to the barrel of the socket or is it the other way round?

    for reference, the socket I have is this one.
     
  2. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,115
    713
    Aug 11, 2014
    I didn't see a schematic on that link but I would hook it up to match the polarity of the 9v adapter.
    usually the center is positive and outside in negative which is usually ground.

    So, just double check the polarity of what your plugging into it and wire it to match polarity.
     
  3. Lawrenciumbc

    Lawrenciumbc

    41
    0
    Nov 2, 2015
    Sorry, the schematic i was referring to was just the vero board layout, here is the direct link.

    Essentially:
    - the 'schematic' has 9v and ground
    - the power supply is -ve polarity

    So my understanding of that is that I should solder the 9v lead to the barrel of the socket and the ground to the center pin of the socket. I just wanted to confirm if my thinking was correct or if it was always ground to the barrel and power to the pin.

    In support of the above logic, I have found a site which specifically sell DIY effects pedal kits and has some useful basic tutorials on. The one in question is a sheet showing the standard wiring configuration for their kits and it shows that the DC socket is wired in the way I thought. The link to the tutorial is here.

    By that and the fact that every guitar pedal I have come accross has a -ve polarity power supply, I think that I was correct.

    Of course let me know if you think that I have mis-interpreted anything.
     
  4. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,115
    713
    Aug 11, 2014
    I don't understand what you mean by "-ve polarity"

    You need to know the polarity (+ or -) of your ps and should verify if the positive is in the inside or outside.

    Use a dvm to measure it or
    show us a picture of your power supply.
     
  5. Lawrenciumbc

    Lawrenciumbc

    41
    0
    Nov 2, 2015
    Sorry by '-ve polarity', I just meant - polarity (as in 'negative'). Here are some photos of the power supply and the DC socket soldered the way I think it should be soldered.

    As I say, I thin that I am correct now but I just wanted to triple check to avoid any problems.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,115
    713
    Aug 11, 2014
    Yes, your right. Power supply has negative on inside pin. Just double check polarity on socket so it matches ps.
    I can't really tell from your picture.
     
  7. Lawrenciumbc

    Lawrenciumbc

    41
    0
    Nov 2, 2015
    ok that's great, the circuit all worked fine from a power perspective so thanks for your pointers.
     
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