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Wiring doors in cold weather

Discussion in 'Security Alarms' started by G. Morgan, Nov 20, 2005.

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  1. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Does anyone have a good technique for minimizing cold air coming into the house
    while wiring a retro? I usually leave the cable box inside the doorway when I'm
    in the attic to prevent the door from closing on the wire, however when it's
    really cold out that's too much of a gap to let air in. I guess I could leave
    the wire box outside and put something in the door on both sides to keep it from
    opening and closing.
     
  2. alarman

    alarman Guest

    Move to Southern California. :)
    js
     
  3. mikey

    mikey Guest

    I saw these really cool little shelters, for locksmiths I think,
    maybe somebody has a name, I can't recall, just saw a picture,
    perfect solution though
     
  4. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I suppose you could tape up some plastic over the door opening.

    I don't know if you have ever seen a large refrigerated food processing
    business. Forklifts loading and unloading trucks, etc. They have plastic
    strips hanging down over the door openings to keep the cold air inside.


    in message
     
  5. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    Maybe make a tent of a painter's tarp over your existing situation.
    Or pull the other way, if you can.


    | Does anyone have a good technique for minimizing cold air coming into the
    house
    | while wiring a retro? I usually leave the cable box inside the doorway
    when I'm
    | in the attic to prevent the door from closing on the wire, however when
    it's
    | really cold out that's too much of a gap to let air in. I guess I could
    leave
    | the wire box outside and put something in the door on both sides to keep
    it from
    | opening and closing.
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    |
    | -Graham
    |
    | Remove the snails to email
     
  6. CondoMaximum

    CondoMaximum Guest

    I close all the interior doors so the cold doesn't spread throughout the
    house. I also turn off the heat if possible till I'm done. I'll prop a box
    of wire against the door on the inside so it doesn't open more than an inch
    or 2 needed for the wire to enter the hole in the door frame.
     
  7. shady

    shady Guest

    Depending on how much room you need, stick a screwdriver in the door to keep
    it open enough. And then something else of the other side of the door to
    keep it from opening further (hammer, shoe, toolbox, etc.).

    And when the box of wire is outside, try not to leave it sitting in a pile
    of snow. Soggy boxes don't tend to hold up well on future jobs.

    Then after you have the wires pulled, get the contacts done before anything
    else so you can close the doors as soon as possible.
     
  8. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest


    Hey G:

    How cold are we talkin' here?? In Edmonton (where I got my start in the
    trade), we were doing pre-wires and retro's in -30 degrees (celsius).
    You don't know "cold" until you've had to put your boxes of wire next to
    a propane heater (on a pre-wire) for about 30 minutes just so it would
    be pliable enough to pull *out* ouf the box (otherwise the insulation
    would be so stiff it wouldn't uncoil). You learn to pull *from* the
    control *to* the point and you have to do it fast.
     
  9. Jim

    Jim Guest


    Not to get into a How cold WAS it? war but you reminded me of something
    that happened to me quite a number of years ago while doing a pre-wire
    in the winter.

    I was pulling four wire through holes I'd drilled through the beams in
    a house. It was COLD. I had to pull about 30 or so feet so I threaded
    four of the quads through about 6 or 8 beams. I started to walk away
    from the boxes and they all came up off the floor. So I laid a a couple
    of 2X8's across the four boxes. I got at the other end of the wire,
    thew it over my shoulder and started pulling as I walked away. As I'm
    walking and not looking at the wire behind me, I hear this sort of
    sprinkling of something on the floor. I turned around and saw a bunch
    of multicolored chips on the floor. Same color as the wire. Looking
    up, I see that as the wire is dragging over the edge of the first hole,
    the jackets of the quads are cracking and the little pieces are falling
    away from the conductors as it drags through the holes.
    I don't know what the temperature was, but THAT's cold!
     
  10. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms

    I suppose that's an option :) Do installers ever make enough to afford the
    $1500/mo. rent for an efficiency apt?
     
  11. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms

    That would be neat, however the time to set that up on each door would probably
    be more trouble than it's worth. Thanks for the idea though.
     
  12. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms
    I suppose taping plastic would be a good idea if I planned on working on the
    door for a while. Thanks for the response.
     
  13. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms
    That would be hard to do in Texas, all the wires go up, not down. Thanks for
    the reply.
     
  14. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms
    That's a good idea. The whole point is to show the customer that you care about
    letting all their heat out. That's a good tip, adds professionalism.


    That's all I could think of too. Thanks for the reply.
     
  15. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms
    Rarely snows here in TX, but when it gets below 40 degrees you 'ld think the
    second ice-age has arrived based on the cx's comments!


    Great idea. Thanks.
     
  16. G. Morgan

    G. Morgan Guest

    Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms

    Not even in the freezin' range! But understand this: anything below 50 F , is
    cold here! ;-0

    I did some pre-wiring in the Northeast one year, I know what you mean about the
    wire getting so stiff you cant even get it out of the box. I despise frigid
    weather, so I guess I'll take Jack up on his offer to move in w/ him!

    Pulling from the control to the door is not much of an option, it is "do-able" I
    suppose but since the wire goes into the attic instead of the basement it would
    be a royal pain in the ass..
     
  17. alarman

    alarman Guest

    Sure. All of the installers that work here also live here.
    js
     
  18. alarman

    alarman Guest


    Ok, but you'll have to learn to talk right.
    js
     
  19. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    They do here too.

    I use glow sticks, push them up into the hole, put a piece of duct tape to
    keep it falling out, close the door, up in attic just attach the wires, come
    back down open door, rip off tape, glow rod falls out and poke ya in da eye.
    You can do it with cut up fish tapes as well.

    It gets cold in Texas?


    | Subject: Re: Wiring doors in cold weather
    | Newsgroup: alt.security.alarms
    | => Crash Gordon <= wrote:
    |
    | >Maybe make a tent of a painter's tarp over your existing situation.
    |
    | Yeah.
    |
    | >Or pull the other way, if you can.
    |
    | That would be hard to do in Texas, all the wires go up, not down. Thanks
    for
    | the reply.
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    |
    | -Graham
    |
    | Remove the snails to email
     
  20. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    Cold is a relative term

    It gets down to maybe 30 and snows 1 or 2 days. To many here that doesn't
    sound very cold however when you are cooked at 100+ almost every day from
    June to early Sept that 30 degrees feels damn cold. And this is from someone
    who came from Indiana :)
     
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