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Wiring a 6 Terminal Rocker Switch

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by jagrct46u, Nov 16, 2012.

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  1. jagrct46u

    jagrct46u

    5
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    I need to wire a 6 terminal rocker switch for my car windows. The previous switch had 6 terminals but only 5 in use. Attached to those 5 terminals were the following if you consider the left hand column of terminals from top to bottom 1, 2 an 3 and the right hand column of terminals from top to bottom 4, 5, and 6.
    1 = green brown wire - no volts
    2 = red green wire - 12 DC volts
    3 = black wire - ground
    4 = empty
    5 = red green wire - 12 DC volts
    6 = green brown jumper wire from 1.
    My question is how would I hook up these wire to my DPDT new switch so I have reverse polarity and the windows will go up and down. I tried hooking up the wires exactly the same as the old switch but the window would only go up but not down.
    Thank you for your help.
    John Salla
    [email protected]
     
  2. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

    837
    6
    Feb 9, 2012
    If you have the part number for the switch or if you can post some pictures we can probably tell you what has to go where
     
  3. Six_Shooter

    Six_Shooter

    98
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    What you're trying to do is create a voltage reversing switch.

    Easy to do.

    The window motor gets attached to the two common terminals.

    Let's look at only half the switch the other half is basically the same.

    So look at the one side of the switch, where there is a common terminal, and two switched terminals, usually the common is in the middle of the two switched contacts. What you would do, is connect positive to one of the switched contacts, and negative to the other. What happens when you push the switch one way is that the contact that connects to that input will allow the specific polarity to flow from the switched contact to the common contact.
    In other words, when you push the switch to make the contact between the common terminal and the positive terminal, then positive voltage will be allowed at the common terminal, move the switch the other way, and you will get the negative voltage.

    So now we have half the problem solved, we can switch the one common contact between positive and negative, but there is no connection to make a full circuit for current to flow, this is where the other side of the switch comes in. It gets wired very much the same way, with the only exception being that the common contact much have the opposite polarity than the other common contact. This is usually done by creating jumpers that "cross over" the contacts, so that there will end up an "X" pattern accross the 4 outside terminals, again, this is where the two common contacts are located between the switched contacts.

    I wrote out this post, then decided to see if I could Google for a picture to illustrate this, and this one is perfect (for the type of switch I describe):

    [​IMG]

    If the switch for some reason has the common contacts in a different position in relation to the switched contacts, the same idea applies, just the actual location of the connections, or "pinout" would be different.

    There are other ways to do this using relays, but it gets a bit more complicated in the wiring, and function, though the end result would be the same.

    Make sure your switch is capable of carrying the current that the window will draw at at the point of being closed, since the current is highest then. I would get a switch spec'd to handle around 20 amps to be sure. If your switch is not capable of that, you should consider using relays to control the circuit.

    If you want to use two switches to control one window, which is common for the passenger side window, the wiring becomes very different for that pair of switches and usually requires a different style switch, pairs of contacts will stay connected with the switch "at rest". At that point relays become the easiest thing to use.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  4. jagrct46u

    jagrct46u

    5
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    Thank you Six Shooter for your quick, thorough reply. I have a few questions. On your diagram, I am assuming I will attach my wires as follows. Please correct me if I am wrong. My black wire will attach to row 2 position 1 and then there will be a black jumper wire from row 2 position 1 to row 1 position 3 (reading from left to right). One of my red/green wires with 12 volts will attach to row 1 position 1 and then there will be a red/green jumper wire from row 1 position 1 to row 2 position 3. My green/brown wire will attach to row 1 position 2 and then there will be a green/brown jumper wire from row 1 position 2 to row 2 position 2. If all of what I have stated is correct, I will have left over one red/green 12 volt wire. What should I do with it? Put some black tape on the end and not use it? Thanks much for your help.

    John Salla
     
  5. jagrct46u

    jagrct46u

    5
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    Here are the specs for the switches:

    The window momentary switch can be used for electronic antennas, or as a power window switch, or door lock switch. The actuator face features up and down arrow markings, and the switch quickly snaps into mounting hole.

    Can be used for door locks, power windows or electronic antennas

    Rated at 20A/12V DC

    Fits 7/8" x 1-3/16" rectangular panel cutout

    Arrow markings on face of rocker switch

    DPDT

    Item # Description Price

    1+ 100+ 500+
    Qty in
    Package In Stock Add to Cart
    73553DL DPDT Window Momentary Switch (1 MIN)
    4.45 3.99 3.39
    1 EA ✓
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2012
  6. Six_Shooter

    Six_Shooter

    98
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    I don't know about your particular colours, since a wire of any colour could be used for any function, but in the case of the above pictured diagram, there would be no direct connection between the two center terminals, they go to the motor itself.

    It sounds like there might be a "rest at positive (or ground)" layout in your car, and that will need to be verified, before progressing.

    In cases like this I usually suggest getting the proper OEM replacement to make repair simple and effective. When changing out items like this, it becomes very easy to blow fuses or worse yet, let out the magic smoke in a device/motor.
     
  7. jagrct46u

    jagrct46u

    5
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
  8. jagrct46u

    jagrct46u

    5
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    Can you please tell me what "'rest at positive (or ground)'" layout in your car means"? I have been working on this car for 7 years and have read much about it and performed MANY repairs. While I will be the first to admit that I don't know everything, I do know much about the car and with some explanation/clarification, I might be able to answer your question.

    I was thinking of attaching the remaining hot red/green wire to row 2 position 3 instead of having a red/green jumper wire from the red/green wire attached at row 1 position 1 to row 2 position 3. If the 12 volts on both sides of the switch does not have to come from the same wire, this should work since all of the requirements of your diagram are met. May I please have your thoughts.

    Thank you much.
    John Salla
     
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