Connect with us

Wires and Power Supplies

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Minnie Mae, Feb 23, 2016.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Minnie Mae

    Minnie Mae

    5
    0
    Feb 23, 2016
    I am following a youtube video to make a LED light panel.

    I have made the first part and need to test the lights before I proceed. I bought a power supply (12v 10amp) to test it though I am planning to use LIPO batteries. The power supply powers, green light on and output tests to be 12.3 V.

    The wires are twisted pair 12awg. One pair is positive and one pair is negative so they are thick.

    I twisted each pair and inserted it under the appropriate screw of the power supply. Should I have separated the pair and inserted them beneath two separate posts of the power supply? When I power on the power supply the green light comes on then goes off. The LED lights never light up.

    Should I tin the thick wires and solder a terminal on each one? Is the problem in my solder joints between the LED light strips and the twisted pair wire?

    I really want to finish this project but I am a super newbie when it comes to electronics! IMG_0438.JPG
     
  2. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    2,921
    798
    May 12, 2015
    You don't need to tin the wires.
    If you say each pair is negative and positive.. Do you mean 'both' wires in a single insulation? Or two pairs where each has a positive and negative?
    Either way, make sure they are not touching each other when screwed to the power supply.
    May be some more pictures would help us help you.. Show us what you mean by two twisted together. Hopefully they will be the right pairs twisted together..

    Martin
     
  3. Minder

    Minder

    3,003
    638
    Apr 24, 2015
    Sounds a s though the P.S. is going into shut down, due to over load?
    12Ga is a little excessive for that current.
    Make sure you have no shorts and test the resistance across each of the conductors.
    M.
     
  4. Minnie Mae

    Minnie Mae

    5
    0
    Feb 23, 2016
    Here are some better pictures. One twisted pair is positive and the other is negative. That's a lot of wire to fit under the power supply screws or into a terminal.

    The light panel requires 12v 10amps but it builds in a voltage regulator and potentiometer.

    I've included a closeup of the led to twisted pair solder joints. led1.jpg led2.jpg led3.jpg
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

    3,003
    638
    Apr 24, 2015
    12ga is each a 20 ampacity conductor, do you need that much?
    You could try it on an automotive battery to see what exactly the current is.
    M.
     
  6. Minnie Mae

    Minnie Mae

    5
    0
    Feb 23, 2016
    I tried connecting my battery charger but it wouldn't work.
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    Is that picture your final wiring? The + side of the strips are not connected to anything!

    Bob
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,645
    1,884
    Sep 5, 2009

    nicely spotted, Bob :)

    that's not really an issue, better too much than too little ;)



    Dave
     
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,645
    1,884
    Sep 5, 2009

    It also looks like these wires are shorting out where you have stripped back the plastic

    split the 2 sections more carefully and then restrip the ends

    you also show them both aiming for the 2 x V+ terminals .... obviously that isn't going to work either

    You have a lot of wiring work to sort out to get this going

    1) strip that twin conductor lead back to 2 individual separate leads
    2) sort out all your positive lines as commented on by Bob
    3) use one busbar line down one side for the positive and one down the other side for the negative connections to the LED strips


    Dave
     
  10. Minder

    Minder

    3,003
    638
    Apr 24, 2015
    Can be if the terminal capacity is exceeded for comfortable termination.
    Just because it works does not make it optimum.:(
    M.
     
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,645
    1,884
    Sep 5, 2009
    it's irrelevant to the issues faced by the OP

    lets forget about sidelines and concentrate on getting the multiple wiring problems sorted out .... ok :)

    D
     
  12. Minnie Mae

    Minnie Mae

    5
    0
    Feb 23, 2016

    I think this photo will clear up some of the confusion. Each pair of wires is negative or positive which is why there were two wires both going to +V.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,645
    1,884
    Sep 5, 2009

    OK that looks/sounds better :)

    so what is that PSU you are showing in the last pic

    it's different to the one on the earlier pic
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  14. Minnie Mae

    Minnie Mae

    5
    0
    Feb 23, 2016
    Its the wiring recommended by DIY Perks - a voltage regulator and potentiometer. I'll worry about that after I am able to get the lights working and know all my connections are viable.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-