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Wireless Power transmission using Atmega .... pls help!!!

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Rahul Rajasekaran Nair, Mar 30, 2017.

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  1. Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

    Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

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    Mar 30, 2017
    Sir
    We are doing a project on wireless power transmission, which focusses on charging of electronic gadgets.
    We are not able to continue with due to technical reasons.... i.e the circuit diagram that we are using is not of a good structure, we believe that is the reason of our failure... so sir , you've gotta help us with the same.....
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,642
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    Nov 17, 2011
    Why don't you show us your circuit diagram for starters?
    We cannot divine what your circuit looks like and where possible failures lurk.
    Which components and/or circuit boards do you use? How are they connected? Where did you get your circuit diagram from and which information is available from the same source?

    We will need a more detailed description of where and how your circuit fails. What do you expect? What happens instead? Which measures have you tried? Which measurements have you taken?
     
  3. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    Yeah and some specs of what you are powering, The current and voltage requirement of the load and the distance the coils will be away from each other, the size of the coils space envelope. Also what do you plan to power all this with?

    Thanks
    Adam
     
  4. Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

    Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

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    Mar 30, 2017
    we have used a combo of two circuits... The circuit which was first meant to be our main circt dint go according to plan coz of lack of the hf transformer in the premises... so we refferd this link and changed the transmitter section and continued with our project () .... now again it doenst work.. Thats it. The basic block diagram is below
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    In the video the circuit on the primary side is a so called joule thief.
    The secondary is only a coil of magnet wire with an LED connected.

    This setup is far from what you show in your screenshot. It is totally unrelated. What exactly do you want to achieve? Power the microcontroller from teh secondary as shown for the LED in the video? Why don't you start by following the instructions in the video and replace the LED by a bridge rectifier with smoothing capacitor. Just for starters. If the voltage on the smoothing capacitor is high enough, add a voltage regulator to get the exact voltage required by the microcontroller.

    Here's an overview of wireless power transmission technologies.
     
  6. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    That's not really a circuit diagram. Post the circuit diagram you used to start with, maybe we can get that going to save you a lot of time, if not, I have worked on this sort of thing for a few years now and a simple LC astable multivibrator is all you really need, it doesn't need to be complicated you can buy the coils on the internet.
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  7. Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

    Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

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    Mar 30, 2017
    Thank you so much.... But can you please explain ... we have replaced the led with a bridge and a capacitive filter followed by a regulator and then a controller from which the output is derived into a male jack which is then connected into the battery
    What else can be done???
     
  8. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    To begin with: does your setup work with only the LED?
     
  9. Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

    Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

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    Mar 30, 2017
    No sir i just told you the plan and wanted to verify will it work if i do it ....
     
  10. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    It may work or not, depending on many details of your construction.
    From your first post I assumed you had built the circuit and it wasn't working.
    From your last point I take it you haven't built anything yet.
    Why not start with the simple LED circuit to check the basic setup, then replace the LED by a rectifier, add a capacitor, add a voltage regulator and so on, step by step?

    With the very simple joule thief on the primary side you will not be able to transmit high power, But I see no reason why this should not work as a demonstration of the principle.
    For high power transmission you will have to study the underlying priciples and you may want to adhere to a standard (e.g. Qi) to make your circuit compatible with existing products.
     
  11. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    The OP messaged me for help. I said I would look at a TX circuit and post it here. This circuit works and I have had it running for some time now. It will easily put 250 mA into a single Lipo battery using the correct battery management hardware of course. L3 is the TX coil you can buy them here. The 150 nF capacitors need to be this type.

    TX-COIL.PNG
     
    (*steve*) and Harald Kapp like this.
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    What's the reason for the specific type of cap?
     
  13. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Dec 18, 2013
    Frequency stability.
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  14. Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

    Rahul Rajasekaran Nair

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    Mar 30, 2017
    well thanks, i''l try with this and report....
     
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