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Wireless Headphones

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by jerryb, Feb 18, 2014.

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  1. jerryb

    jerryb

    68
    2
    Feb 18, 2014
    Hi, I've got a set of Thomson WHP462 wireless headphones that have been working perfectly until the other day. When the charger is switched on there is a red light that is supposed to glow, it just blinks once now, and when the charger is turned of the red light comes on and slowly fades. This happens wether the phones are plugged in or not. I've taken the cover off but there are no obvious signs of damage. Don't know a lot about electronics so need pointing in the right direction (which is probably the dustbin). Thanks for any help.
     
  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,803
    507
    Jan 15, 2010
    Is it time to replace the batteries in the headphones themselves?
    Maybe they're not accepting the recharging.
     
  3. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    Seems as if the battery is dead.

    Can you measure the battery voltage?

    Snap
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
  4. jerryb

    jerryb

    68
    2
    Feb 18, 2014
    It's not the batteries, the batteries are in the headphones and this fault occurs whether the headphones are connected or not.
     
  5. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    What is the red light supposed to show?
    If it is to show that charging is taking place, then either the batteries will not accept the charge or the cable is not making a connection.
    I suggest you measure the output voltage of the charger.
     
  6. jerryb

    jerryb

    68
    2
    Feb 18, 2014
    Hi, sorry for the gap, Adapter and headphones OK so it must be in the charger.
     
  7. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,271
    Nov 28, 2011
    It sounds like the power supply is starting up, then detecting a problem and going into a lock-out state. Have you changed anything about the AC supply into the power supply?

    It could be the optocoupler in the power supply, but it could be a lot of other things too. You could open it up and look for visible damage, e.g. overheated components, but there may not be any.

    You could also check carefully for dry joints on the board, and components that may have been damaged or pulled out of their connection points if the unit has suffered blunt force trauma :)

    While you're in there, you could take photos of both sides, and make a list of the markings on all the encapsulated components with four or more connections. It's unlikely to help though.

    What are the output specifications printed on the charger? It should be marked with an output voltage, a maximum current, and a drawing showing the plug polarity, i.e. whether the centre is negative or positive (or something different if it doesn't use a conventional adapter plug).

    It might be simplest to just replace it. Is there a way to check whether the headphones are charging? Do they have an indicator? So you can check that the replacement power supply is doing the job.
     
  8. jerryb

    jerryb

    68
    2
    Feb 18, 2014
    Hi, I think I'm going to bin it, probably cost more to fix than replace, that's technology for you, ta for the help.
     
  9. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
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    Nov 28, 2011
    It might be worth a quick look inside. But if you value your time, it's almost certain to be more economical to replace it. Have you found a suitable replacement power supply?
     
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