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Wireless doorbell to control remote circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Jaydekay, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    Hello,

    I have a simple circuit running on a 9v battery. Lets just say it lights a light bulb for simplicity sake.

    I just purchased a wireless doorbell, and am hoping to modify it to remotely control the circuit (open and quick close is fine).

    Is this possible? It was a cheap $10 doorbell, so I figured I'd give it a shot.

    The door bell runs on 3 1.5v AAA batteries.

    The blue and yellow wires go to the speaker for the doorbell.

    Thanks for your help!

    Image attached.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    I also have a multimeter which I could use to prod around the board if you have anything in particular that I should look at.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  3. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    It appears that 1.5v is getting passed along to the speaker. I need more V than that for my circuit, something more like 9v. Any thoughts on how I can get that as an output?

    For example, what about using 2 transformers from an AC wall adapter in reverse - would that work?
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  4. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    Hi Jaydekay.
    Whats the 9 volts going to power / operate ? :)
     
  5. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    If you reverse a transformer your get more than 9 volts mmmmmmmmmuch more. :D
     
  6. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    It is to create a small shock to deter rodents from an outdoor food source.

    Right now I have it working successfully as follows.

    9V battery > Transformer > Output

    The transformer was pulled from an AC wall adapter, and I am using it in revers to step up the voltage (it was naturally used to step down the voltage from 120 to something very small for a shaver). The shock is small, but sufficient for my purposes. However, using the doorbell at 1.5V stepped up is such a small tingle that it won't work for my purposes.

    Would 2 transformers help?

    Currently, I need to get up in order to operate and would like to do it remotely.
     
  7. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    The only way it will work remotely is a sense circuit an optical PIR or similar, i am not sure where a 9 volt battery fits in to your idea, are you going to sit and watch, then zap them as they pass, kill time ? :D yes you can step up voltage reversing transformers, current will be low, but enough to kill a rat, a security PIR modified is a better idea, or is the door bell dual purpose, to let you know the Rats arrived, hope your visitors dont mistake it for your door bell, "OUCH" :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  8. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    There is another Rat zap thread on the boards, look at Tezza 1 's thread, might be some ideas there. :)
     
  9. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    Yes, my plan is to just manually zap them when I see them. I like your idea but it's more than I need.

    The setup I described is my frist iteration without the remote control.

    Iteration 1 (no remote):

    9V battery > Transformer > Terminals for shocking.

    With iteration 1 I was just manually connecting the positive wire to the positive on the 9V battery anytime I wanted to zap them. Worked like a charm, but when they see me approaching the "control" with the battery, etc, they run away! They're making a game out of it, so I want to be hidden and out of sight when I shock them. Note I need to be inside, and the food is outside. I am currently running the wire through a crack in my sliding glass patio door, which is not idea since its 30 degrees here.

    Iteration 2 (with wireless doorbell):

    3x 1.5v batteries > Doorbell Output wires > Transformer > Terminals for shocking.

    In this second iteration, the shock was very minor.

    I don't need/want to kill anything, but a shock at least as strong as the initial iteration is needed. I can handle the shock but it is not friendly :)

    Any further thoughts after this clarification?

    Thanks again, and I will check out the rat zap...
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  10. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    Quote: but when they see me approaching the "control" with the battery, etc, they run away! They're making a game out of it,

    These are clever rats, making a game out of playing with mains voltage, i have to say this, dont you think its a little sadistic to wont to zap them manually, surely its more humane to use an automated device as a deterrent, or you could just try removing the reason for there curiosity, no not your electrocution door bell invention, i was thinking of the food source there interested in. ;)
     
  11. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
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    Sep 5, 2011
    I hear you, but I want certain animals to be able to eat the food, and not rodents. So, without getting too wild with bells and whistles on the project, the plan for my next iteration is to go "remote-manual".
     
  12. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    With out getting bogged down in building a transmitter receiver circuit, you can buy short range units for remote use with single or multiple channels, just put together the zapping part of the circuit and your good to go, i would bin the door bell idea. :)

    http://www.maplin.co.uk/search?criteria=transmitter+receiver+remote+

    If needed for power options use a relay.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2011
  13. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    Yeah, I think I'll ditch the doorbell idea. You're right on track with the transmitter/receiver combo - that looks great!

    If I get one, say with a 2-14v range, does the single 9V battery power the receiver as well as the shock circuit?

    Also, If you don't mind, can you describe how a relay would benefit me? Are you saying I could use the relay to open close the circuit and have the shock circuit at a different voltage than the relay itself.

    I'm just a DIYer learning along the way here -

    Thanks again for your help so far!
     
  14. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010
    Have not read any of the first page, but yes, that is how a relay works. It either opens or closes a separate circuit. You hook 120V or w/e to the Normally open side of a relay and then activate the relay it will close the circuit and do whatever it is you want that circuit to do. The two circuits are electrically isolated from each other, with the relay being the only mechanical connection between the two. Mechanical because the electromagnet pulls on a lever will either close or open the circuit.

    Google will probably have a nice flash example you can view if you are not seeing it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2011
  15. Jaydekay

    Jaydekay

    17
    0
    Sep 5, 2011
    Nice - thanks for the info Jackorocko!
     
  16. davelectronic

    davelectronic

    1,079
    12
    Dec 13, 2010
    Jackorocko explained the relay, no you would not get your high voltage from a 9 volt battery, i would build this first, then incorporate the receiver end to activate the high voltage circuit, from the remote transmitter in your hand. :)
     
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