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Wire connection point to point?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by KWXYZ, Jan 25, 2021.

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  1. KWXYZ

    KWXYZ

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    Jan 25, 2021
    Sorry, for the Newbie Question?
    I know I can use legs of a Cap or Resistor, but what are these called?
    and do they come in standard sizes?

    wires.jpeg

    https://i.imgur.com/QDF3Q39.jpg

    Thanks

    Moderators note : inserted image
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 25, 2021
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  2. bertus

    bertus Moderator

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  3. dave9

    dave9

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    Mar 5, 2017
    They're usually just referred to as jumper, hookup, or bus wire, typical solid copper core that's tin plated. Sometimes it's called wire wrapping wire or protoboard wire. You can buy kits in different pre-cut lengths but that's really expensive compared to just getting a roll of wire in the gauge you need (for current capacity required) and cutting and bending to the length you need.

    As usual, you will end up paying a premium for a short length of wire compared to buying hundreds to thousands of feet at a time. I mean in wire gauges similar to what you pictured, then with lower gauges, less length, similar weight.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/22-AWG-Gau...uss-Wire-25-Length-0-0254-Silver/372103153169

    For a one-off project, if I really wanted to avoid making a double sided board, I'd just grab some scrap ethernet cable and tin that, or magnet wire, bell wire, etc. in whatever gauge was needed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2021
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  4. KWXYZ

    KWXYZ

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    Jan 25, 2021
  5. KWXYZ

    KWXYZ

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    Jan 25, 2021
    Thanks, on it's way, Now I know what they're called.
     
  6. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Those are jumper wires, solid copper wire that is solder coated or tin plated. For a high-volume consumer electronics product like a VCR (back when), these were stitched into the board by an automated machine with a large reel of the wire. It is a low-cost alternative to a double-sided, plated-through hole pc board.

    First, a robot places glue dots at the location of every surface-mount component on the bottom side. Then those components are placed by another robot. Then the top side through-hole components are placed. Then the bottom side is wave soldered, soldering both the SMT and PTH components.

    ak
     
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  7. Kabelsalat

    Kabelsalat

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    Jul 5, 2011
    There is one little confusing thing (English) - The use of same word for this kind of jumper and the kind of detachable jumper you place onto a couple of pins to make a short. Locally - I'm used to name those with different terms.
     
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  8. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    Yes, still calling them the same is Okay since they achieve the exact same purpose, which is to galvanically connect two points, only with slightly different way.
     
  9. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Pedantically, the two-pin header on the pc board is a plug. We always used a P reference designator for them. We used a W designator for an installed wire. On some boards we use 0 ohm resistors, and those were designated with an R.

    ak
     
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  10. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Jumpers. If permanent or final board version, the tinned variety is preferred, but for general/varying lengths of jumper wires using bread-board or Strip (Vero) board, I use a piece of single strand telephone cable, (2 to 4 pair), leave the insulation on for the longer versions.
    Home depot etc has it by the foot.
    M.
     
  11. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Double-versus-single sided is, first of all, a description of the bare pc board with no components. This goes back to when there was a huge cost difference between the two. Separate from that is double-sided versus single-sided assembly, something that became a thing with surface-mount technology (SMT). There is a big difference between hand-soldering a couple of resistors or capacitors on the bottom side of a board, and having a robot place a hundred components or more. The image in post #1 is a single-sided board with double-sided assembly. Based on a cost analysis of both the production and long-term reliability of the assembly, someone decided that a bunch of jumpers was more cost-effective than the second copper layer.

    A significant issue is that top-side SMT components can be soldered only with a reflow oven, which melts ordinary electrolytic capacitors and connector bodies, and placing a few hundred components on the top side as through-hole (PTH) parts, even with a robot, is a big cost increase. The parts are bigger, which increases the bare board size, and more expensive than their SMT alternatives.

    When you're going to produce 100,000 of something, there are a *ton* of tradeoffs to consider. For example, PTH components have shock absorbers and compliant mountings built-in - they're called the leads. Flexing a pc board assembly is bad, but there are degrees. An all-PTH board can be flexed without damage much more than an all-SMT board. A couple of our MIL customers banned SMT ceramic caps above a certain size because of cracking during shock testing.

    ak
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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  12. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    it's a SINGLE sided board, there is NO pcb tracks on the top side !! a double sided board has tracks on BOTH sides.




    You obviously dont understand what the jumpers are for. So here it is. live and learn ;)

    When tracks on the lower side need to cross one another, from one part of the board to another, Jumpers are needed to "bridge over those tracks



    Obviously not ;) :)
     
  13. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    As per Davenn, the single/double side refers to the presence of foil/tracks, on a "single" side or a "Double" side.
    The jumpers are considered just another device, as a 0.0 ohm resistor etc would be.
    M.
     
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  14. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Then you need to adjust your thinking. You are incorrect.
    That is not relevant. "Double-sided board" is an industry-standard term. I suggest that you abandon what is in your mind and learn its correct usage.

    ak
     
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  15. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    No, you can't. Your naivete is dripping. In a word - backplanes.

    A VPX backplane can distribute a 6 GHz signal per pin pair (each signal is a differential pair). That is squarely in the middle of the microwave C band. Normal connector pins (and plastic) do not function well at these speeds, so the connector is a stackup of multiple thin pc board wafers. Each has signal connections routed with micro-stripline techniques.

    The pin density is large. In the same space as 200 pins (signal, power, and ground) on a VME backplane, a 6U VPX board has over 700 signal contacts, plus additional contacts for multi-amperes of power supply currents at various voltages. In an optimizing pass for one backplane, I was able to reduce the layer count from 30 layers to 24 layers.

    Fun fact: at these frequencies, the length of a via from one layer to another has a measurable effect on signal integrity. You can't just run a via through all layers and connect to it anywhere in the middle. If you do that, the unused parts of the via form stubs that cause reflections. You have to use a fab technique called back-drilling. Tricky and expensive.

    ak
     
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