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Wire and Insulation Q

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Watson A.Name - Watt Sun, Sep 1, 2003.

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  1. I have a few thousand feet of some old plastic insulated twisted pair
    telephone wire stuck away in my garage that has me puzzled. It's 24
    AWG (.5 mm) but the insulation is thicker than usual. The usual
    overal diameter is .044" or 1.1mm, but this wire is about .065" or 1.6
    mm. I've cut chunks off to use in some places, and wherever I cut and
    strip it, the copper is tarnished like it was stripped and exposed to
    the elements for years. But that's underneath the insulation. So I'm
    puzzled as to why the insulation didn't protect it from being oxidized
    and corroded. Maybe something in the insulation itself?

    The color codes don't conform to the ones in use today, probably
    because things were different a few decades ago. I think that it
    might be good for hooking up field phones in a forest somewhere. Any
    ideas?

    BTW, I was web surfing and found some interesting info the other day
    on "Murphy phones" for cave rescue. Might be of some use, somedsy.
    http://www.cc.utah.edu/~nahaj/cave/phones/

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  2. Ed Nielsen

    Ed Nielsen Guest

    Sounds like Quad cable that used to be used for telephone. 4 conductor,
    not even twisted pairs. They used to use all 4 conductors -- green/red
    for talk and black/yellow for the ringer, which used to be a bell that
    drew a fair amount of current at 90VAC.


    CIAO!

    Ed Nielsen
    Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers Member ID #M119247
    CENCOM
    http://www.cencom94.com
     
  3. George

    George Guest

    Bell and voice were driven from the same loop (green/red). The usual install
    was to use the black/yellow for a second line or for the "Princess" lighted
    phones. Those phones had small lamps in them. In that case they used a "wall
    wart" type transformer to power the second pair which was used to power the
    lamps.
     
  4. It seems that some wires, in particular silver plated wire, will tarnish
    from the plasticizer in the insulation.

    Cheers!

    Chip Shults
    My robotics, space and CGI web page - http://home.cfl.rr.com/aichip
     
  5. Ed Nielsen

    Ed Nielsen Guest

    I remember tearing into some phones that had them going to the bell, but
    then again, my memory may be a bit foggy on that. Wasn't quite
    yesterday. <G>


    CIAO!

    Ed Nielsen
    CENCOM
    http://www.cencom94.com
     
  6. In our area, the yellow was for the 90Volt ringer. Three wire.
     
  7. James Knott

    James Knott Guest

    Some of the old party line phones used a 3rd wire, to determine which of 2
    subscribers the call was for.

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  8. James Knott

    James Knott Guest

    Were you on a party line?

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  9. No, it's a single twisted pair, with odd colors like blue and black.
    Thanks.
    --
    @@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
    ###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
    http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
    My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
    goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
    Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
    that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
    http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
    Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
    changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
    @@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
     
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