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Will this work??

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by jlatenight, Sep 9, 2005.

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  1. jlatenight

    jlatenight Guest

    Hi! I have a camcorder that I need an AC adapter for, and I found a
    universal AC adapter at BestBuy that should do the trick accept for one
    thing: the voltage needed by the camera is 7.9v at 1.4amps. The
    universal adapter has two voltage settings that are close, but not
    exact. The adapter will supply enough current, so I know I'm fine
    there. One's 6.5v and the next one is 8.4v. So..if it seems to run ok
    at 8.4 volts am I ok?? I mean, do I run the risk of frying my
    Camcorder b/c I'm pumping too much voltage through it? Half a volt
    doesn't seem like a lot, but I thought I'd ask to be safe. The
    instructions for the adapter say "[this device] is fully regulated
    using high efficiency switching technology and features overload and
    short circuit protection."
     
  2. That's about a 6-7% difference, which "should" be okay. YMMV...

    There are ways to regulate the 8.4 down to 7.9 also.

    Tom
     
  3. 3T39

    3T39 Guest

    Hello, jlatenight!
    You wrote on 9 Sep 2005 13:00:39 -0700:

    j> Hi! I have a camcorder that I need an AC adapter for, and I found a
    j> universal AC adapter at BestBuy that should do the trick accept for one
    j> thing: the voltage needed by the camera is 7.9v at 1.4amps. The
    j> universal adapter has two voltage settings that are close, but not
    j> exact. The adapter will supply enough current, so I know I'm fine
    j> there. One's 6.5v and the next one is 8.4v. So..if it seems to run ok
    j> at 8.4 volts am I ok?? I mean, do I run the risk of frying my
    j> Camcorder b/c I'm pumping too much voltage through it? Half a volt
    j> doesn't seem like a lot, but I thought I'd ask to be safe. The
    j> instructions for the adapter say "[this device] is fully regulated
    j> using high efficiency switching technology and features overload and
    j> short circuit protection."

    Be sure to check polarity before connecting up.
    There may be an indication of polarity next to the connector. The camera
    will work fine at either setting, providing the polarity is correct.

    With best regards, 3T39. E-mail:
     
  4. Darmok

    Darmok Guest

    You should be fine .. that voltage is probably sent through some kind
    of regulator inside the camcorder anyway. (probably 6vdc circuitry
    inside).

    If you are really paranoid, just get yourself a 3amp silicon switching
    diode (1N4001), and break the + line, and feed through the diode.
    When you draw current through the diode, you will get a .5 to .6
    voltage drop, putting you right around the 7.9vdc you were looking
    for.
     
  5. Guest

    If the adapter is close to the 1.4 amp rating of the camcorder then it
    may be ok. Universal adapters and many other cheap brick adapters
    have very little voltage regulation. One of these adapters rated at 7
    volts at 2 amps will be 7 volts when drawing 2 amps. Take that same
    brick and reduce the current and you'll see the voltage go up to 10
    volts or more. It is best to check the no load voltage first before
    using it on an expensive piece of equipment.

    * If your universal adapter is rated higher than 1.4 amps then you
    might want to select the 6.5 volt setting. This setting may actually
    be very close to 7.9 volts at your camcorders 1.4 amp requirement.
     
  6. Dave D

    Dave D Guest

    That will work quite well, but not for long- the 1N4001 is only rated at 1
    Amp!
    Maybe you meant a 1N5401?

    Dave
     
  7. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Anything for a camcorder is probably a switching regulator (lightweight box,
    not a big heavy transformer) so the regulation should be decent.
     
  8. Darmok

    Darmok Guest

    Touche'

    Bill, KB8EB
     
  9. jlatenight

    jlatenight Guest

    Thanks everyone for your responses. Here is the one I bought:
    http://www.simacorp.com/products/item.ep.html?session=e53cac0513088967baa590bf6e541136&id=493

    Specifications SUP-60
    Input Voltage 120 VAC
    Output Voltages / Maximum Current
    3.3 Volts / 2.1 Amps
    4.2 Volts / 2.0 Amps
    5.0 Volts / 1.9 Amps
    6.5 Volts / 1.7 Amps
    8.4 Volts / 1.6 Amps
    9.5 Volts / 1.5 Amps
    Dimensions 3.0" x 1.5" x 0.8"

    I'll measure the voltage and current at 6.5v & 8.4v and see which one's
    closer at no load. Just wondering how to know if the camera can handle
    ..5v or so higher than it needs. And it does say "[this device] is
    fully regulated using high efficiency switching technology and features
    overload and short circuit protection."
     
  10. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    You're talking a cheap consumer grade camcorder, I'd be surprised if the
    output of the original power supply is tight enough tolerance to be within
    0.5v of the spec, you'll be just fine a volt or two either way as the camera
    is certain to have it's own internal regulator.
     
  11. Mike Berger

    Mike Berger Guest

    I'd measure the voltage under load connected to the camcorder
    to see how close it really is. Those universal AC adapters
    are usually way way off.
     
  12. No load means zero current.

    Tom
     
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