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Wifi Transmission; Energy involved in sending a Wifi Signal

Discussion in 'Radio and Wireless' started by akahn430, Oct 29, 2016.

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  1. akahn430

    akahn430

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    Oct 29, 2016
    I'm currently working on a project involving Wifi transmission. The device needs to send a 1-3 digit number to a computer/phone that is 5-15 feet away. Approximately how much energy will this take to send one number?

    Thank you!

    Austin
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,617
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    Sep 5, 2009

    hi Austin
    welcome to EP :)

    a very odd question
    A wifi connection is maintained, once a connection is established with or without data being transmitted
    There is continuous background link etc checking going on

    do you really need wifi ? Bluetooth would probably be easier

    so would you like to tell us what you really mean

    Wifi and BT are low transmitter power devices, they will have a minimum power out of maybe around 10 - 20 mW


    Dave
     
  3. akahn430

    akahn430

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    Oct 29, 2016
    Hi Dave. Thanks for the response.

    Depending on the range that is needed, I suppose it could use Bluetooth.

    What I am trying to get at is: I need to make a system that calculates force in an object when struck (Accelerometer), then sends that force back to a Computer/phone... and it has to power itself, so first, I need to figure out how much energy needs to be generated for each time the Force (1-3 digit number) is sent to the computer, for the system to function.
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    BT is good for up to 10m

    Power needed in the way u are asking is irrelevent as i said earlier there is going to be continuous power usage. Not just when u send data
     
  5. akahn430

    akahn430

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    Oct 29, 2016
    Thanks again for the response.

    So there would need to be a constant voltage? How would I go about figuring out how much energy has to be generated to power the constant voltage?
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    You multiply:
    1. the voltage (required by the transmitter and produced by the power source)
    2. by the current (drawn by the transmitter)
    3. by the time (that you want the transmitter operating -- could be minutes, hours, or days)
    That gives you an amount of energy required.

    From that you can choose an appropriate battery.
     
  7. akahn430

    akahn430

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    Oct 29, 2016
    Ah, makes much more sense now. I really appreciate the help!
     
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