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Why does a dc motor "stutter"

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by jackyson, Dec 25, 2017.

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  1. jackyson

    jackyson

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    0
    Dec 25, 2017
    I have a 12v motor, scavenged from an inkjet printer (there isn't a model # on the motor). I have a pulley set up on the motor, that moves a load of about 375 grams. When I connect the motor to 12v, the pulley "jumps"(like a stepper motor) about a mm or so, but then stops, and wont move any more until it is disconnected and then reconnected to 12v. Why is this happening? I wasn't expecting this to happen, but actually I am building a small scale cnc, so this is actually pretty useful. The only thing is, I need a way to make this more precise, so that I can tell how much the motor moves each "jump". I would also like to know, if it is possible, how to make the motor run continuously, without stuttering.
     
  2. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    It shouldn't, what is the exact nature of the motor?
    Sounds more like a stepper motor, if anything?
    The CNC system would need to be pretty small if it is a stepper of that size, which they often are from prointers etc.
    M.
     
  3. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,276
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    Jun 25, 2010
    How many wires come from the motor? If it's more than 2 then it's as @Minder suggests, a stepper motor.

    If there are only two - and some printers use normal motors mounted with slotted opto-couplers - then the motor could just be stalling under load and may require reduction gearing to increase torque.
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Does it run continuously when not loaded? If not it likely is a stepper, or a brushless DC motor that requires external electronics to run it. A picture might be useful.

    Bob
     
  5. Bryan McMullan

    Bryan McMullan

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    Jan 4, 2018
    I'd be willing to bet it's your power supply overheating or something.
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    I have never used stepper motor but this sounds as if it is one.
    You can probably find the steps/turn by energising one winding with a steady current and counting the number of 'cogs'.
     
  7. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Can also be done by simply shorting the winding's and spinning the shaft.
    M.
     
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