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White ink , fine tip, felt-tip pen ?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by N Cook, May 26, 2007.

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  1. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    For permanent marking missing legends or other added comments to black cased
    ICs.
    Do they exist?, not necessarily Staedler or even white , just something
    thats not dark red,green,black or blue, that stays on and contrasts with
    black plastic.
     

  2. I used to use a large sewing needle and one of those tiny bottles of
    model paint. i could write, if I took the time, or just color code the
    parts. I had a couple dozen bottles I bought for 10 cents each, in red
    and silver. Everything else was gone by the time I got there. :)


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  3. bz

    bz Guest

    Fingernail polish comes with built in brush. Lots of different colors
    available now days.




    --
    bz 73 de N5BZ k

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap
     

  4. The brush is too wide to write on ICs with.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  5. Try electrical suppliers. They used to have a type with white paint/ink and
    a roller ball tip.
     
  6. Rick

    Rick Guest

    They exist. I even have white artists pencils. Check art supply stores -
    not office supply stores. IIRC you are looking for something used to
    retouch blue prints.

    Rick
     
  7. Bob  AZ

    Bob AZ Guest

    In the states I go to Michaels. An Art and Craft store. At least a
    dozen colors and that many types.

    Bob AZ
     
  8. mike

    mike Guest

    I've had absolutely horrible results with the white roller-ball markers.
    I always got a wide smear of paint with a ball track down the center.
    But you can find silver felt markers that are much easier to use and
    don't dry up and quit working after the first time you use 'em.
     
  9. N Cook

    N Cook Guest


    What is it used for by electricians ? so I don't seem too much of a
    numb-skull when I enquire
     
  10. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    Would the silver ones be in arts and crafts?
    The last time I was in a large hobbycraft shop I did not find anything
    suitable in the way of fine felt pens. I assumed somewhere there was
    something better than my usual toothpick dipped in typing correction fluid
     
  11. bz

    bz Guest

    Depends on how you trim it.
    And it IS fine for color coding. :)

    By the way. Those colors are handy for marking 'look alike' parts when you
    are building a kit. That way, you do not need to unsolder the capacitors
    to find where you swapped a .01 and a .001. :)


    --
    bz 73 de N5BZ k

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap
     
  12. RBJ

    RBJ Guest

    They exist indeed.
    I have different colors like > white,gold,silver,whiteblue etc.
    The pen has an liquid-ink inside and are supplied through a very thin tube
    (aprox. 0.3mm) with a thin rod sticking out about 0.5mm at the tip which
    lift the valve inside.
    They write very clean/nice and permanent.
    I bought them in Germany on my holiday.
     

  13. That was what I used red model paint for. I repaired Commodore 64
    computers to the component level when they first came out. I built a
    test bed with ZIF sockets to test suspect ICs. Good chips got a dot of
    paint by pin one. Some of the parts already had yellow or green dots,
    so I used the red paint I already had. A guy in the Orlando Commodore
    computer club asked me for an estimate to repair his computer.

    It was about fifty dollars. He was yelling that I was trying to rip
    him off, and to bring it to him at the next meeting, even though
    everyone else charged $75 or more to even look at one, and usually
    exchanged the board with a factory rebuild. He went though his rants
    again, then left.

    The next week he was back, screaming, "I replaced all the chips you
    marked bad, and it still doesn't work! You don't know what the hell
    you're doing!" I smiled, and about half the other members did, as
    well. I told him that I marked GOOD parts, not the bad ones. He
    started swearing and screaming that I had to use green paint to mark
    good parts. I told him I preferred red, and it was obvious that he was
    a thief, and had never intended to let me repair it in the first place.
    He never came back. :)


    I've never had that problem, in 45+ years of building electronics.
    When building a kit, I always sorted the parts as I unpacked them, to
    make sure everything was there.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  14. We used similar pens for drafting back in the days before computers. Of
    course we only used black ink.
     
  15. We used to use them to label switchboards when they were made out of
    composite material (like industrial Arborite).
     
  16. Smitty Two

    Smitty Two Guest

    The ubiquitous Sharpie brand felt tip pen comes in quite a few colors,
    including one called "almond" which is pretty light.

    http://www.sharpie.com/enUS/Product/Sharpie_Ultra_Fine_Point_Permanent_Ma
    rker.html
     
  17. You could try one of those White-Out pens that they sell at office supply
    stores. I don't know if the point would be sharp enough though.

    - Mike
     
  18. Rick

    Rick Guest

    Art supply stores. The kind that college art students, professional
    artists and architects get supplies at. Not the current spate of chain
    hobby stores "specializing" in silk floral arrangements and paint your
    own t-shirt junk.

    Rick
     
  19. N Cook

    N Cook Guest

    They are probably not permanent on hard plastic.
    It would have to be permanent like th eStaedler Lumocolour or Stanger makes,
    both German
     
  20. bz

    bz Guest

    Of course one should do that. However, when building a complex kit with
    lots of 'look alike parts', even the most careful person may work a couple
    of minutes past 'too tired', and grab the wrong part for a particular
    location. Later, one notices that one is 'short' a particular value part
    and realizes that one must have already used it in a wrong place. Fun to
    try to find without color coding.

    Color coding the parts once they are sorted gives one
    a) the chance to double check the sorting.
    b) a way, later, to double check the placement against the layout diagram.
    c) comes in handy when, for example, your Elecraft K2 transciever shows a
    strange spurious response on a particular band because you interchanged
    two bypass capacitors.



    --
    bz 73 de N5BZ k

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap
     
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