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Which phase is my electrik socket on?

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Cameo, Jan 3, 2010.

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  1. krw

    krw Guest

    DimBulb, you're a dumb shit and wrong, as always. He doesn't want to
    buy them until he's sure they'll work. There is no such assurance,
    but he's been given answers to his question, no thanks to you.
     
  2. Rich.

    Rich. Guest

    Like the original poster, I was talking about 120 volt circuits and then
    expanded upon your answer to clarify when a 3-wire is is used as the homerun
    to the panel. A 240 volt load has nothing to do with it. With a 3-wire
    homerun, the black and red have to be on opposite phases in order to have
    the neutral carry the unbalanced load. If the breakers for the black and red
    were on the same phase, then the neutral could end up carrying the full load
    of both circuits and burn up. So because of potential 3-wire homeruns, one
    cannot simply swap breakers that are next to each other without knowing if
    it can be safely done.
     
  3. Precisely correct.
     
  4. Any dope that uses electric to heat his space(s) with in this day and
    age deserves all the problems that world can hand to him.
     
  5. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    Well when you know what fuse/breaker each is on, then you know which
    phase each is on just by looking at the panel.
     
  6. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    I hadn't thought of those, I've seen it done once, but I don't
    particularly care for the idea. Personally I always use standard 2
    conductor cable so each 120V circuit gets its own neutral.
     
  7. Multiple circuits are usually on the same phase. What you want to do is
    get a circuit tester and string it from the hot line of one to the hot
    line of the other. If there's enough differential voltage to light the
    tester, they're on different phases. If there's not, they're on the
    same phase, but perhaps not the same circuit.

    Or you could use a voltmeter. The voltage between different phases in a
    house is 240 volts or so. The voltage between different outlets on the
    same phase is a lot less than 120V. In a building with 3-phase power,
    you will see either about 240 or 208 between phases. Again, if it's a
    lot less, it's the same phase.
     
  8. Jeez, you really are clueless.

    Try not to say shit that will endanger folks with your fucked in the
    electrical knowledge. At least you didn't do that... yet.
     
  9. Cameo

    Cameo Guest

    OK, I made a couple of pics of the breaker panel and I hope you can view
    them on the following links.

    These are the breakers:

    <http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AR41cGCzYT76ZGZnaDk2NjJfMmR4ZjVqNWo2&hl=en>

    The circuit breakers I am interested in are the blue ones on the left
    and the one immediately above them, labelled "Foyer, etc." For some
    reason it's 30A, while the blue ones below are 15A. I'd like to be sure
    that the "Foyer" breaker is on the same phase as the 2nd from the
    bottom, labelled "Kitch/Fam Rm Lights." I'd rather not call en expensive
    electrician to install a bridge capacitor or whatever.

    The following link shows some info about the breaker panel and it's
    pasted inside of the panel door:

    <http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AR41cGCzYT76ZGZnaDk2NjJfMGN3N3Rrcmcz&hl=en>

    I hope it can help you experts to answer my original question so I don't
    end up with a useless HomePlug kit.
     
  10. Cameo

    Cameo Guest

    Paul, I'm not sure how all this connects to my original question but
    it's a pleasant surprise to see your name pop up after all these years
    since I saw it last time at Lazy B's internal news groups. I guess you
    left it, too. It was fun till it lasted, huh?
     
  11. The color coding tells me that one side is one phase, and the other is
    the other phase.

    I am guessing due to never having seen such a configuration, but I am
    betting that the entire left side is one phase, and the entire right side
    is the other phase.
     
  12. Rich.

    Rich. Guest

    They are not on the same phases. The "Foyer" breaker is on the "A" phase
    while the "Kitch/Fam Rm Lights" breaker is on the "B" phase. What might be
    confusing you is those blue breakers are mini breakers. They are nothing
    more than two 1/2" tall breakers bound together to fit into one 1" tall
    breaker slot. Each 1" tall breaker slot is on a phase. The first left/right
    pair starting at the top is on the "A" side, the second left/right pair is
    on the "B" side, the third left/right pair is on the "A" side, the forth
    left/right pair is on the "B" side, etc.
     
  13. Rich.

    Rich. Guest

    Um sorry I make a mistake in identifying the "A" and "B" phases. Everything
    I wrote is correct except that you'll need to swap every "A" with a "B" and
    vice-versa.
     
  14. krw

    krw Guest

    You mean the blue 15A double-breakers and the red 20A double-breakers,
    AlwaysWrong? Wrong again, as always. What a dufus.
    What an ignorant ass, you are, AlwaysWrong. The oven and the drier
    are going to work *real* well on zero volts. No 240V circuits could
    be used in the box if you were right. As always, you're wrong.
     
  15. Cameo

    Cameo Guest

    Oh, shoot! There goes my HomePlug idea unless I really want to call an
    electrician. But that in itself would probably cost more than a good
    HomePlug kit. Anyway, thanks for the reply.
     
  16. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest



    The legs/phases/buses in the panel are interleaved, so the first slot is
    leg A, the next one down is leg B, the one below that is leg A, and
    below that B, and so on. The blue breakers are doubles, so each pair of
    those is a slot. In your case the garage light is on the same phase as
    the kitchen lights
     
  17. Cameo

    Cameo Guest

    It just occured to me that X-10 and HomePlug frequencies are quite
    different and I wonder if that X-10 bridge would even work for HomePlug.
     
  18. I was not referring to ANY of the 240 volt service breakers, you
    retarded twit. Obviously.

    I also said that I was unfamiliar with it and that I was making an
    assumption.
     

  19. Best description yet. That "left, right, left" crap was too confusing.
     

  20. It passes HF from one phase to the other, so there is no reason it
    wouldn't.

    It is high pass filter, so there would be no limit imposed, so there
    should be no reason it wouldn't work.
     
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