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Which is best for starting out?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Kaldanis, Jul 22, 2011.

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  1. Kaldanis

    Kaldanis

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Hi everyone! My knowledge of electronics is fairly limited at the moment - all I know has been gained through my college physics class. I'm starting a physics degree in 2 months and hoping to minor in electrical/electronic engineering. I'm looking for advice on where to start learning the basics. From looking around I've found these 2 books - Electronics: A systems Approach and The Art of Electronics. Which of these would be the best, or if neither, where would you recommend I start?

    I'm very interested in building an AM/FM transmitter, so if any books include sections on that too it would be a bonus!

    Thanks for any advice
     
  2. poor mystic

    poor mystic

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    Apr 8, 2011
    Hi Kaldanis :)
    It's not exactly the 1st time I've recommended The Art of Electronics on this forum and it won't be the last.
    Mark
     
  3. Kaldanis

    Kaldanis

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Hi mystic! I read tha Art of Electronics is very good but a little dated now, is this true? And does it cover AM/FM transmission etc?
     
  4. poor mystic

    poor mystic

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    Apr 8, 2011
    10 years has brought lots of change but no misconceptions will arise from the book's age as a result. It has a good section on RF modulation which includes those modulation systems.
    I haven't heard of any book to replace it.

    Get 2nd edition
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  5. daddles

    daddles

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    Jun 10, 2011
    The basic principles don't change, so -- for the most part -- this book will be timeless. Of course, the parts they reference might only be available to archeologists, but this won't stop a clever person. :p

    When I was a young scientist, there was a book on electronics by Diefenderfer (I think that's how it was spelled), but AOE is far, far better. It's why you read things from the masters -- they give you insights the plebes don't.
     
  6. poor mystic

    poor mystic

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    Apr 8, 2011
    That's the right kind of thing to say, Daddles. Looking back after I had written my post I was thinking of Shakespeare; Machiavelli; there are some works which are simply timeless. Horowitz and Hill are indeed masters.
    When you want to get your maths sorted out another great book I like to recommend is "Engineering Mathematics" by K.A.Stroud. That's how to cut through the dross!
    Pity I don't know of anything of similar standing in any of the other science crafts. Anybody have further recommendations?
     
  7. daddles

    daddles

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    Jun 10, 2011
    Here are some of the books I consider timeless that I refer to quite a bit:

    Feynman's Lectures on Physics
    Courant, "Differential and Integral Calculus"
    Abramowitz & Stegun
    Margenau & Murphy, "The Mathematics of Physics & Chemistry"
    Machinery's Handbook
    Knuth, "The Art of Computer Programming"
    Stroustrup, 2nd ed. on C++
    The American Machinist's Handbook (edition from 1940's)
    Neter & Wasserman "Applied Linear Statistical Models"
    Yavorsky & Detlaf, "Handbook of Physics"
    CRC Handbook of Engineering Science
    Schwarz, "Information Transmission, Modulation, and Noise"
    Resnick & Halliday, "Physics"
    Crow, et. al., "Statistics Manual"
    Marks "Mechanical Engineering Handbook"
    Perry & Chilton, "Chemical Engineer's Handbook"

    If I could only have two (sets) of books, they would be the first two listed. If I could only have one, it would be Feynman.
     
  8. poor mystic

    poor mystic

    1,067
    31
    Apr 8, 2011
    That's great!
    These books are also very good for people starting out in electronics:
    Forrest Mims' Engineers Notebooks
    National Semiconductor Data Books
    ARRL Handbook

    More mathematical intrductory treatments of telecommunications topics can be found in F R Connor's series which includes titles on Noise, Signals, Electronic Devices, Modulation, Networks, Waves, and Antennas.
     
  9. Kaldanis

    Kaldanis

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Ah yeah, I'm about to get the Feynman lectures. I'll look over the calculus one too
     
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