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Where can I buy a Zenith DTV converter?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Feb 9, 2009.

  1. Guest

    I keep reading that the Zenith DTV converter is one of the best.
    Because I live in a rural area, I am limited to Walmart with their RCA
    and Magnavox brands. However, I'm willing to drive to one of the
    larger cities if I can get the Zenith. My problem is what stores
    carry that brand? I know the nearest large city has Best Buy, Sears,
    Target, Kmart, and a few other possible stores. Does anyone know
    which stores carry the Zenith? Also, is there just one Zenith model,
    or are there more? If I cant find this brand, are there other really
    good converters?

    I'm in a fringe (rural) area, and need one that will really pull in
    stations. I do have one converter already, an Apex brand. It was one
    of the early models. I cant say anything really bad about it, other
    than the remote buttons being too small, but I went from getting 8
    analog channels to only 4 channels on digital. I'm hoping another
    brand will do better.

    Thank U

    LM
     
  2. Rich Webb

    Rich Webb Guest

    Best Buy's Insignia brand converter (at least, the NS-DXA1-APT that I
    picked up) is a Zenith on the inside, with some tweaks to the look &
    feel of the menus and on-screen displays. Works great, no complaints.

    Only downside, for some folks, may be that the schedule only shows now
    and next. On the plus side, you can tune to *all* digital channels, not
    just ones that are present on an auto-search, so there's the possibility
    of tuning to a known but not seen channel and tweaking the antenna to
    pull it in.
     
  3. Is that really true? I have the Zenith DTT901 -- which is the one I
    think we're speaking of here.

    After the scan setup, I 'click' to 13.1 and I view the programming
    broadcast on TV Chan 24. Then I 'click' to 9.1 (un-assigned -
    "No Signal") and what frequency/TV Chan does the unit switch to?
    And, if I 'click' to 9.2 - 9.3 -- what?

    I believe with tropo propagation, I could (at times) view (some of) the
    Denver area stations. But, I'm not confident that 'clicking' up their
    assignments would put me on their operating frequency.

    Inquiring minds,
    Jonesy
     
  4. alchazz

    alchazz Guest

    Each time you click on a new station, your converter box scans the range
    of frequencies where 9.1, for example, is supposed to be. Then it locks
    in on it when it finds it. That's one reason why changing stations is
    slower in digital than in analog which had only one frequency.

    Al
     
  5. DocDice

    DocDice Guest

    Try this mail-order link.
    Doc..


    http://xrl.us/befi7n
     
  6. Rich Webb

    Rich Webb Guest

    Good question. There are sites (http://www.tvfool.com is one I've used)
    that list the actual and virtual channel information. Try both? My guess
    is that the virtual channel number over-rides the actual one but only
    after the PCIP data is decoded. Perhaps there are some boxes that allow
    selective tuning of one or the other?
     
  7. Guest

    No it doesn't. It goes to the actual channel number from its lookup
    table from when it 'scanned'. It doesn't do a 'new' scan. It has to
    wait for the 'sync' data to begin decoding the data stream. Look near
    the end for "VSB Modulator"

    http://hdtvprimer.com/ISSUES/what_is_ATSC.html

    The actual channel list is

    http://www.nab.org/AM/ASPCode/DTVStations/DTVStations.asp

     
  8. Guest

    You can often (not all receivers support this) punch in the actual DTV
    carrier frequency and the unit will then get the analog channel number
    from PSIP. Channel list here.

    http://www.nab.org/AM/ASPCode/DTVStations/DTVStations.asp

     
  9. I got a Zenith DT-901 at RadioShack last year. The current model is the
    DT-901A, though I don't know what the difference is.
     
  10. Hi!
    It seems to work well and run cool. Reception is more than good
    enough. The on screen fonts are legible, and the remote seems to be
    usable in the dark.

    As to the RCA and Magnavox converters...the RCA I would definitely
    avoid. It's far too limited and acts as though it does not have enough
    processing power. It also can't accept manual addition of channels
    later--a problem if you have a very directional TV antenna that might
    need to be rotated so you can get all the stations in your area.

    I've put a few of the Magnavox units out so far, and they work
    acceptably well. The display text is pretty good quality. My only
    concern is that they are made by Funai, whose quality track record
    is...shall we say...on the dubious side. Other than that, the only
    real drawback is that you can't work the unit from the front panel--it
    only offers remote control.

    There are two Zenith models that I know of--the DTT900 and the DTT901.
    Both are identical in looks, but the DTT901 offers analog passthrough
    when it is turned off.

    If there is a Radio Shack in your area, they stock the Zenith
    converter as well as a Digital Stream branded unit. The Digital Stream
    unit is really, really nice. It has a comprehensive program guide,
    receives well, can be operated (at least to change channels) from the
    front panel and was clearly designed by people who Thought Of Things
    That Might Be Good Ideas--for example, the red LED that shows up when
    the unit is off but receiving power actually dims...great if you have
    the unit in a bedroom.

    William
     
  11. Hi!
    This is likely to be firmware dependent. I can say for certain that
    the Zenith DTT-901 will let you punch in any channel number and it
    will try to tune it. If you type in the "real" channel number of a
    broadcasting station and it differs from the "virtual" or "commonly
    accepted" channel number used by that station, the virtual number is
    displayed when the unit locks on and starts playing TV programming.

    William
     
  12. Honestly all of those boxes seem like junk to me. Are there
    I can't speak for the absolute quality (sensitivity, image quality) of the
    DT-900, but it's a nice product. It's cosmetically attractive and /looks/
    well-made, and is easy to use (it practically sets itself up). It is not
    cheap crap or junk.

    I don't blame you for not wanting to buy Chinese products, but American
    businesses are more interested in immediate profits than attempting to
    compete using American labor.
     
  13. We (the U.S.) have forfeited whatever manufacturing capabilities we once
    had in the downward rush to the bottom line, and have nobody to blame
    for this but ourselves.


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
  14. I actually did some research about Zenith. They were bought out
    My cell phone is an LG. The company is actually Lucky Goldstar, a name not
    likely to inspire confidence in American customers.
     
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