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What's a "charge pump"?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Steve Evans, Nov 9, 2004.

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  1. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    Helo,

    whats a charge pump, what does it do and how does it work? Is it true
    it can be used to step-up DC volatages?

    tnx,

    Steve
     
  2. John Larkin

    John Larkin Guest


    Very generally, the idea of charging capacitors and carrying the
    charges here and there. You can, for example, charge a number of
    capacitors in parallel from, say, a 9 volt battery, then disconnect
    them and rearrange in series and get N*9 volts, at least for a while.
    Simple diode-capacitor circuits (voltage doublers or multipliers) can
    be considered charge pumps, too. A Marx generator is an extreme charge
    pump.

    PLLs sometimes use "charge pump phase detectors" which shoot short
    current blips, hunks of charge, into a capacitor to pump its voltage
    up or down.

    I guess it's any circuit that depends on quantized charge to define
    its operation. This, like a lot of other circuit terms, is fairly
    vague.

    John
     
  3. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    Oh yeah Ive heard of diode voltage multipliers someplace.
    So say I've only a pretty crappy low voltage available, like 5V say,
    and I want to momentarily whack a capactior up to say 15V, could I do
    it by pumping a short but powerful 'packet' (or *packets* ) of charge
    from the 5V source into it? Would the capactior store the excess
    charge in the form of excess voltage accross its plates if you get
    what i mean?

    tnx
     
  4. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    It won't, because no matter how "powerful" the packets are, they've
    only got 5V from the supply across them, so you're stuck with 5V.

    BUT...

    You _could_ charge up a bunch of capacitors in parallel, and then hook
    them up in series, and discharge them into the cap you want to whack
    up to 15V, like this:

    CHARGE
    +5V---+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
    | | | | | |
    [C1] [C2] [C3] [C4] [C5] [C6]
    | | | | | |
    GND---+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+



    DISCHARGE

    +--[C1]--[C2]--[C3]--[C4]--[C5]--[C6]--+
    | |
    | |
    +---------------->[C7]<----------------+

    Since all of the caps were charged up to 5V, when you hook them up in
    series all the voltages add up, (the same as if you were to hook
    batteries in series) so at the instant you connect all the caps in
    series to C7 there'll be a total of 30 volts across C7. It won't stay
    at 30V for long though, since it's like filling an an empty pitcher
    with a full one.
     
  5. Another way to do this is with an inductive spike. Inductors like to
    keep current flowing through them. Thus, if you get current flowing, and
    then cut it off suddenly, the voltage at the point you cut it off will
    spike due to the sudden extra electrons (or lack thereof).

    This is how DC-DC boost converters work. They have an oscillator that
    turns on and off current through an inductor, and tap the point where
    the inductor and transistor meet (the point with the voltage spikes)
    with a diode pointing away from the junction. They then charge up a
    capacitor with the 'packets' of charge that the inductor keeps sending
    in, regardless of the voltage. A feedback mechanism turns off the
    oscillator when the voltage reaches the point the circuit is designed to
    get to.

    The amount of power that can be taken from a circuit like this is
    defined by the frequency and duty cycle of the oscillator, the
    inductance of the inductor, and the voltage across it when charging.

    You can buy these dc-dc converters off the shelf for various voltages,
    or build them pretty easily. White light LEDs require about 4V to light,
    but they can be lit from a single 1.5V AA battery using a simple circuit
    like this.

    --
    Regards,
    Robert Monsen

    "Your Highness, I have no need of this hypothesis."
    - Pierre Laplace (1749-1827), to Napoleon,
    on why his works on celestial mechanics make no mention of God.
     
  6. peterken

    peterken Guest

    yes, it IS possible to get 12V from 5V, i've done it in a circuit needing
    +12V/-12V for a few mA supply and only having 5V available
    you'll need an oscillator circuit giving a 0-to-5V wave (say a 555 circuit
    or something similar), and one voltage doubler for every output
    Carefull, using a TTL output is NOT enough due to the diode-drops and TTL
    usually going only swinging from 0.8 to 3V

    (view in notepad using fixed font)


    |\|
    +--||------------+-------| |--+--o +12V
    | | |/| |
    | --- |
    | / \ |
    | |\| --- |
    +--||--+---| |---+ |
    | | |/| --- ---
    | | --- ---
    | --- | |
    | / \ | |
    | --- === ===
    | |
    | |
    | o
    | +5V
    |
    |
    | |/|
    +--||------------+-------| |--+--o -12V
    | | |\| |
    | --- |
    | \ / |
    | |/| --- |
    +--||--+---| |---+ |
    | | |\| --- ---
    o | --- ---
    (osc) --- | |
    o \ / | |
    | --- === ===
    === |
    ===






    Oh yeah Ive heard of diode voltage multipliers someplace.
    So say I've only a pretty crappy low voltage available, like 5V say,
    and I want to momentarily whack a capactior up to say 15V, could I do
    it by pumping a short but powerful 'packet' (or *packets* ) of charge
    from the 5V source into it? Would the capactior store the excess
    charge in the form of excess voltage accross its plates if you get
    what i mean?

    tnx
     
  7. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    Tnx, Terry, thats not quite what I was getting at.
    lets say I wanted to contrive a VCO where controle voltages of 4.3,
    10.25, and 18.35V were needed at certain intervals; would a charge
    pujmp do the trick? is it accurate enough from a 5V source to bump up
    that much precisely?
     
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