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What should I get for beginning electronics?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Conor, Jan 11, 2018.

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  1. Nanren888

    Nanren888

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    Nov 8, 2015
    There's some truth in what *Steve* says about rules, but I'd add another.
    There's a need to tell when the rule being applied is not a rule at all, but myth, misguidance, often well-intentioned, or not applicable.
    - addition, not replacement
    Still read his 3 rules.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    So, @Nanren888, the fourth rule is that sometimes my three rules are a simplification?

    Well played :)
     
  3. tedstruk

    tedstruk

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    Jan 7, 2012
    A pair of linemans pliers.
    A pair or insulated rubber gloves,
    and a short small wooden stick.
    you might want an assortment of wooden sticks of different lengths and thicknesses...
    or plastic sticks...
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,501
    2,841
    Jan 21, 2010
    Not to mention:
    1. A used rubber tyre
    2. A long piece of string
    3. Three bananas
     
    davenn likes this.
  5. Nanren888

    Nanren888

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    Nov 8, 2015
    .
    Off-topic, sorry, but, well yes, but not what I'd meant, I thought you'd covered that one, but out of scroll range just now..
    I sort of meant that there's always one who will tell you, sincerely, patiently, with your best interests at heart, that it's the Hz, or hurts, that makes the hydrogen & the current doesn't matter. Sometimes proof by bold assertion looks so legit.
     
  6. Doug3004

    Doug3004

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    Sep 5, 2014
    I'd say...
    First, read a book on basic electronics. You want some idea of what the fundamental components do (resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors) and the basic laws.

    Second, get the basic tools: soldering iron, multimeter, breadboard & jumper wires. The multimeter does not need to be expensive, even the very cheapest ones work pretty well usually.

    After that it gets less clear....

    I like to use multicolored wire when I build stuff, as it makes tracing problems through a rat's nest of wires easier. And you're going to need wire. Places sell assortments of different-colored hookup wire, in solid and stranded varieties. The solid wire will work in breadboard holes--not REAL good, but it works.

    Beyond that it really depends on what areas you are interested in. Some areas of electronics use parts that you hardly ever seen used in others. And even then, there's no point in buying every part you see. You don't need vacuum tubes unless you are building a tube amp or a vintage-style HAM radio--and even then, there's a few good tube choices for those uses, and lots of tubes that aren't really very good even if you can get them for free.

    When starting out, I don't think it's excessive to buy general assorted packs of basic parts like resistors, capacitors and inductors, but keep in mind that electronics hobbyists tend to be habitual pack-rats. (-And I can't say I'm totally innocent of that offense... :rolleyes: ) Every OLD electronics geek tend to have a HUGE pile of parts that ends up getting sold at their estate sale. There is always a temptation to buy more (because the cost-per-part is lower) but if you want to minimize the clutter, it may be better to just buy what you need as you decide on particular projects.
     
  7. Hopup

    Hopup

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    Jul 5, 2015
    I think best way for a complete beginner is to first learn basic components one by one. Every time you learn new component, you should make simple circuit to demonstrate how it works to yourself. Oscilloscope is very important especially when learning things first time since it gives visual feedback how things work.

    I wouldn't recommend using breadboard, but veroboard (stripboard) where your work is saved much more reliably and will also teach soldering and component placement while creating the circuit.
     
    Cannonball likes this.
  8. FuZZ1L0G1C

    FuZZ1L0G1C

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    Mar 25, 2014
    Theory first, including basic electrical concepts, component identification and function.
    Once you have the basic knowledge, start out with simple, basic circuits to lay the groundwork.
    Books and knowledgeable mentors/forums can guide you to higher levels of electronic nirvana.
     
  9. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    May 20, 2017
    Further to my earlier comments. There is no quick and easy path to learning about electronics. I suggest that you buy yourself a copy of Paul Horowitz's book "The art of electronics". It is available on Amazon's site and will tell you everything that you need to know. Over the years it has established itself as the bible of electronics.
     
    FuZZ1L0G1C likes this.
  10. CTP4500

    CTP4500

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    Mar 3, 2018
    Ditto here too. Simple things like multimeter comes in handy. Hobby stuff for me. weekends. Simple projects like Alarm systems, web cams, Fire alarms, radios, security systems, such as circuitry in NAND gates, or NOR gates, and building security systems. Awhile away.
     
  11. CTP4500

    CTP4500

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    Mar 3, 2018
    I got a Doug Lowe book from the library for only $1. 8 in one. Then I got two other books, still borrowing. Finally, I got a multimeter. For starters. And as a refresher course, so it doesn't eat me alive inside. Remembering my A in Algebra class in college, passing trigonometry and Calculus classes. Keeping those books for life. Rule #1, Be specific, what do I want out of this ordeal. Changing a car stereo. Most popular amonst teenagers or car owners. Rule #2: do I have enough info to go on? yes. With these two rules my project is almost complete. Plus I just use a high school diploma to prove I'm legit. So I write this stuff on my resume. Added info, they might like it.
     
  12. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    May 20, 2017
    (*steve*) you forgot the Box of Monkeys and the Kilo of brain cells.
     
    (*steve*) likes this.
  13. FuZZ1L0G1C

    FuZZ1L0G1C

    366
    118
    Mar 25, 2014
    Electronics Point, Wikipaedia, literature, lots of coffee for the long nights visiting above. zzz...
    ;)
     
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