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what measure reflects % of charged object that is uncharged?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by David Virgil Hobbs, Apr 17, 2004.

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  1. WHAT UNIT OF MEASURE IN ELECTRONICS REFLECTS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN
    ORGANISM/UNIT THAT HAS MANY INTERNAL SUBUNITS CHARGED AND AN
    ORGANISM/UNIT THAT HAS FEW SUBUNITS CHARGED?

    My question is, in electronics is there a measure of charge that takes
    into account how much of the measured object is electrically neutral?
    For example, supposing there was an organism (or unit), organism X,
    that contained 10 molecules of which 2 were positively charged and 3
    negatively charged. And suppose there was another organism, organism
    Y, that also contained 10 molecules, with 3 being positively charged
    and 4 being negatively charged. Assume all charges to be 1 or -1. Is
    there any unit of measure in electronics that would reflect the
    difference between organism X and organism Y, which is that 5 out of
    10 molecules in organism X are charged whereas 7 out of 10 molecules
    in organism Y are charged?

    What if any formal unit of measure in electronics measures an
    organism/unit's total charge per weight of the organism/unit (total
    charge/weight)? What if any formal unit of measure in electronics
    measures an organism/unit's total charge per volume of the
    organism/unit (total charge/volume)?
     
  2. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    This isn't an electronics thing, it's a chemistry/physics thing.
    An object made out of atoms consists of protons, electrons,
    and neutrons. The percentages you are looking for can all
    be worked out from the periodic table.

    Unless you are talking about really tiny objects, any extra
    charge added in the course of "electronics"-type operations is
    absolutely trivial compared to the charged particles in the
    atoms themselves.




    Bob Masta
    dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
     
  3. John Larkin

    John Larkin Guest

    Charge is measured in coulombs; a single electron has a charge of
    1.6e-19 coulombs. Charge/weight would just be coulombs/kg or
    something.

    If an object is conductive, the charge is just spread all around,
    basically shared among the atoms. If it's not conductive, there could
    be lumps of positive or negative charge here and there, but you could
    stick it in a Farady cage and then measure the net charge induced into
    the cage.

    John
     
  4. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    coulomb/mole.
     
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