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what kind of soldering is this?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by soldernoob, Oct 16, 2012.

  1. soldernoob

    soldernoob

    4
    0
    Oct 16, 2012
    this is a basic cellphone mobo.

    attached is the top and bottom of the mobo and the component that needs to be replaced

    does this job require regular soldering or is there something more?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    That all depends upon your skill set, I could easily do it with just an iron... But, many might find it challenging or suggest a solder sucker or wick to aid it removal and clean up... Hot air is another option, but could damage the plastic portions if not done properly...

    Chances are if you have to ask you will be challenged by the removal...
     
  3. soldernoob

    soldernoob

    4
    0
    Oct 16, 2012
    Yeah, as my name implies, will most likely be a challenge, but one id like to conquer.

    *scratches head*

    it is a small component, about the size of a bb. The original soldering is very tiny.
     
  4. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    That is because it's done with solder pasted screened onto the board... The reflow process uses only a small amount of solder most of the time vs traditional hand soldering...

    I have made the offer to others, if you are willing to cover shipping both ways I can do it for you no charge...
     
  5. soldernoob

    soldernoob

    4
    0
    Oct 16, 2012
    Very intriguing. I'll have to consider that.

    While we're at it, is there any reason or times to use a braid instead of a sucker?
     
  6. ICGengineerTech

    ICGengineerTech

    58
    1
    Aug 15, 2012
    You should be able to flow this solder out with no problem. I'd certainly use wick as that will be the easiest way to do this especially if your new. Make sure to use flux on the wick and the component on the PCB. Also, make sure your solder temp is around 670 degrees F (about 355 C). The most important thing you need to make sure of when desoldering is making sure you have removed any and all conformal coating on the PCB and the component. Sometimes a wooden toothpick works well also a bit of alcohol. Normal rubbing alcohol leaves a residue but that shouldn't be a problem for your application.

    To answer your question about about the braid vs a sucker... it often comes down to personal preference. I rarely use a sucker and often opt for wick when needed. For a sucker to work well it needs to be a good one and those are far and few between. Alternatively you can set up what I like to call the Poor Mans Solder Station. It basically uses a shop vacuum for a sucker. If you put your PCB on the vacuum hose it should sick. Once you start heating up your solder, if you have a decent enough seal, it should just get sucked right out of it's barrel for you. Give it a try and good luck.
     
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    I find heating and a quick snap of the wrist will and/or an abrupt smack on the table (board in hand, smack hand against table) works well to kick solder out of the holes...

    I personally hardly ever use either, but they do come in handy every so often... I will use the solder sucker to clean through holes once in a while, before setting a new part... And wick to clean surface pads prior to reflowing if there is existing solder, this allows the part to sit flatter...

    Do practice with both on a scrap board before you attempt a repair, you can EASILY lift pads and traces with wick if you are not careful, same with the sucker if you keep reworking a hole...
     
  8. Jotto

    Jotto

    120
    0
    Aug 24, 2012
    Radio Shack sells a cheap solder sucker that is good and easy to use. Its heated with a red ball to suck to the solder out. The replacement tips are cheap, I used to buy them all when I would go there. Its not as nice a rework station but is acceptable. I use a Pace and Hakko setup, but I used this unit for many years with good results.
     
  9. ICGengineerTech

    ICGengineerTech

    58
    1
    Aug 15, 2012
    This is so true. I also like flowing the excess solder down the run if it's not coated.


    This is so true. Golden rule of wicking... if the wick can't lift away from the the solder area with ZERO resistance assume your wick has become soldered to the PCB/component. STOP pulling and reflow the solder holding the wicking down. You'll save yourself lots of trace & eyelet repairs just following that one simple rule.
     
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